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Posts Tagged ‘Sarah Voisin’

Awards Honor Human Rights and Social Justice Reporting

Contributed by Nick Massella

On Wednesday May 26, the Robert F. Kennedy Center for Justice and Human Rights and George Washington University’s Global Media Institute announced the winners of the 42nd annual Robert F. Kennedy Journalism Awards and the 2010 Book Awards. The winning entries included diverse subjects such as human trafficking, infant mortality, Navy abuses against gay sailors, and Iranian state repression. The awards were presented by Kathleen Kennedy Townsend and Mary Courtney Kennedy Hill. Ethel Skakel Kennedy, wife of the late Senator and former Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy, attended the event.

ABC News journalist Diane Sawyer was among the RFK Journalism Award recipients but was unable to attend. Her award, in the domestic television category for “A Hidden America: Children of the Mountains,” was accepted by her colleague Claire J. Weinraub.

Two Washington Post photographers also received RFK Journalism Awards, including Carol Guzy, who won in domestic photography for “No Greater Love.” The RFK Center describes her 2010 entry as “a strong emotional narrative that speaks to the process of dying, as well as Alzheimer’s disease, aging and home health care.” She was also the Grand Prize winner in 2009.

The Washington Post’s Sarah Voisin was recognized for “In Mexico’s war on drugs, battle lines are drawn in chalk” in the international photography category. Her photographic reporting profiles the drug war in Mexico. She said that her inspiration for the assignment came from “the Mexican-based journalists that have to live there and report this story. They face life or death decisions on whether to report the truth about the drug cartels.”

The RFK Journalism Awards honor outstanding reporting on the issues that define the life and work of Robert F. Kennedy: human rights, social justice, and the power of individual action in the United States and around the world.

The RFK Center also presented the 2010 Book Award, which is awarded to an author who faithfully and forcefully reflects Robert Kennedy’s concern for the poor and powerless, his struggle for honest and even-handed justice, his conviction that a decent society must assure all young people a fair chance, and his faith that a free democracy can act to remedy disparities of power and opportunity.

This year’s Book Award went to Amy Bach for Ordinary Injustice: How America Holds Court, an investigation of inequalities in America’s criminal justice system. In addition, Dave Eggers was awarded a Distinguished Honor for his book, Zeitoun.

The remaining Journalism Award winners after the jump.

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WaPo and NYT Lead Overseas Press Awards

2677-congratulations_greeting_cards.jpg WaPo has raised its Overseas Press Awards award total to 37. This year’s awards are being announced in Manhattan tonight.

The reporting team of Bob Woodward, Rajiv Chandrasekaran and Karen DeYoung won for best news interpretation for their series on the Obama Administration’s search for a new Afghanistan strategy. WaPo photographer Sarah Voisin won for images of residents in Mexican communities affected by drug wars.

The John Faber Award for Best photographic reporting from abroad in newspapers or news services went to WaPo’s Sarah Voisin.

Not included among the 37 OPC awards won by the newspaper, a book called The Good Soldiers by WaPo’s David Finkel. Finkel won the Cornelius Ryan OPC Book Award for his account of eight harrowing months with the 2-16 Ranger Army Battalion in Iraq.

NYT Magazine’s Alissa Rubin won for best magazine reporting for a story on a would-be female suicide bomber in Iraq. The TimesÂ’ second OPC award went to Keith Bradsher for best business reporting on the contradictions and promise of China’s environmental push.

WSJ’s Farnaz Fassihi won the coveted Hal Boyle Award for best newspaper reporting from abroad for”"Hearts, Minds and Blood: The Battle for Iran.”

The AP won the Robert Capa Gold Medal Award for best photo reporting from abroad requiring exceptional courage. Noteworthy: “Khalil Hamra’s pictures of the Israeli military incursion into Gaza showed bravery, especially as combatants mingled among the civilians.”

CBS’s Andy Rooney received the President’s Award for lifetime achievement and David Rohde, the NYT correspondent who escaped his Taliban captors, will light the Press Freedom Candle in honor of the 71 journalists killed last year in the line of duty.

In the cartoon category, THE THOMAS NAST AWARD for best cartoons on international affairs went to Nate Beeler, of The Washington Examiner.

See a complete list of award winners after the jump…

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