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Posts Tagged ‘Scooter Libby’

It Was One Year Ago Today…

…that Tim Russert testified in the Scooter Libby trial.

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Morning Reading List, 09.07.07

morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • Taryn Luntz is joining The Examiner to cover Virginia and business news from the Seattle Times where she has been covering Washington for the paper.

  • Jen Lash is leaving Roll Call to be the assistant editor for Architectural Lighting. Her last day is Sept. 7.

  • From an ABC release, “On the eve of General David Petraeus and Ambassador Ryan Crocker’s highly anticipated testimony before Congress regarding the war in Iraq, ABC News will again examine how the Iraqi people and the country are faring in its sixth division-wide reporting effort, ‘Iraq: Where Things Stand,’” which will begin airing Sunday, September 9.

  • From a release, “Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu has become a sponsor of China’s first Global Business Journalism Program that launches on September 17 at Tsinghua University. The goal of this unique initiative, run by this prestigious university and the International Center for Journalists (ICFJ), is to create a new generation of business journalists able to produce insightful, balanced coverage of China’s markets and the global economy.”

  • Can you answer today’s Political Trivia from CQ?

  • We hear that the RSVP’s closed on Thursday for the GQ party. One tipster says they had an overwhelming response, with Bloomberg levels of attempted pre-crashing.

  • From TVNewser, “Despite Email Protest, Felling Back On Joe”

  • La Plata’s Media Policy Limits Access

  • TVWeek reports, “When Fox Business Network launches Oct. 15 nationally, it will be part of a round-robin channel shift in New York, home of Fox News and the financial capital of the country. The repositioning will involve channels owned by NBC Universal.”

  • Poynter Online points us to “great online news and tools for reporters in the latest edition of SEJ’s Watchdog Tipsheet, which covers First Amendment issues for journalists who cover the environment.”

  • TVNewser reports, “CNN is opening political bureaus in several key states as the race for the Republican and Democratic presidential nominations heats up. A CNN insider tells TVNewser the bureaus in Des Moines, IA, Manchester, NH and Columbia, SC are already operational. They are being staffed at CNN Newsource affiliates in those cities.”

  • SEJ Panel Aims to Get Scientists, Journalists Working Together

  • A NBC release announced, “‘NBC Nightly News with Brian Williams,’ iVillage.com and msnbc.com will join forces for a special series, ‘The Secret to Her Success.’ Beginning on September 10 and
    continuing throughout the week, ‘Nightly News’ will close the broadcast each evening with reports on four important topics (women’s health, work, finance and friendship), which will cross over to the far reaching online communities of iVillage and msnbc.com with additional reporting and components.”

  • C-SPAN’s Presidential Libraries: History Uncovered debates tonight. The first show is live from the Herbert Hoover Presidential Library. For more information, click here.

  • Amy Gahran tackles, “Conversational Journalism: Credibility Gained or Status Lost?”

  • From a release, “To celebrate its 25th anniversary on Sept. 15, USA TODAY is partnering with American University’s School of Communication on a series of free live events to be held Sept. 10 through Sept. 14. In addition, a special exhibition of 25 USA TODAY front pages will be exhibited in the Katzen Arts Center throughout the week.” Events include some impressive panelists, including Helen Thomas, Eric Lichtblau, Ken Paulson, Judy Woodruff and Bob Schieffer. From E&P: “Assessing ‘USA Today’ As 25th Anniversary Approaches”

  • A reader gives us more info on Nina Totenberg’s singing habit. She apparently “comes from a musical family and occasionally sings at events for NPR.” She even sang at her own wedding.

  • Politico’s Ken Vogel reports, “Bill O’Reilly blasts DailyKos as a ‘hate site,’ but according to a federal ruling released Tuesday, the popular liberal blog is as much a part of the media as Fox News when it comes to campaign finance rules.”

  • The Washington Blogger Meetup is September 19 at 7:00 p.m. at Regional Food and Drink. To RSVP “yes” click here.

  • “It’s almost fifty pages long, but well worth the read: a recent study by the Pew Research Center for People & the Press synthesizes 165 separate national surveys and finds that American news preferences have remained ‘surprisingly static’ over the last twenty years. Tucked behind this central conclusion, however, is a suite of more intriguing observations about readership and audience habits.”

  • Can Camera-Phone Journalism Thwart the ‘Rally Squad?’”

  • The Boston Herald reports that Bill O’Reilly ranks #24 in Harvard’s list of most influential alumni, beating out Sen. Ted Kennedy’s #28.

  • “Project Censored Releases Censored 2008 and its pick of the 25 most important under-covered news stories of 2006-07. … Project Censored will host the award winning authors of the Censored 2008 stories at the second annual Media Accountability Conference October 26-27 at Sonoma State University.” Conference info is available here

  • CNN HD Debuts

  • Can Camera-Phone Journalism Thwart the ‘Rally Squad?’” Journalists awarded second place in the online reporting category to Greenwire’s Michael Burnham, Kelly Thompson, Monica Trauzzi

  • From a release, “The 43-year-old Conservative Book Club has completed the acquisition of the American Compass Book Club. American Compass was launched three years ago as part of the Doubleday Entertainment family of clubs. Both clubs serve the philosophically conservative book-buying market. The combined clubs, which will operate under the Conservative Book Club name, will have a membership of more than 100,000. The deal was signed Tuesday in New York.”

  • A reader writes, “For the whiner complaining about the Sunday Source Perino thing, the SS goes to press on Wednesday. No way for them to see into the future.”

  • TVNewser reports, “CNBC will air the first presidential debate to focus on economic issues.”

  • TVWeek reports, “Rejecting strong opposition from the cable industry, Federal Communications Commission Chairman Kevin J. Martin is moving to require cable system operators to offer consumers both analog and fully digital signals for TV channels after the digital conversion, unless they provide a digital signal and converter box to every household.”

  • The Washington City Paper reports, “The Washington Post fails to complete background check on Shaw activist.”

  • Washington Post Executive Editor Leonard Downie to discuss the future of the news business at SPJ.

  • From a SPJ release, “Chicago Sun-Times columnist Robert Novak to discuss CIA leak, Scooter Libby trial. … Novak and former Time, Inc., editor-in-chief Norman Pearlstine will be on hand during the 2007 SPJ Convention & National Journalism Conference to discuss the ethical questions of journalists as central players in a criminal prosecution and scandal. As part of the discussion, titled ‘Watching the Watchdogs: Ethical Implications of the Entangled Roles of Journalists in the Scooter Libby Case,’ Novak and Pearlstein will explain how they handled the dual roles as witnesses and journalists and the lessons learned. The event takes place at 2:45 p.m., Saturday, Oct. 6 at the Hyatt Regency Capitol Hill, 400 New Jersey Ave., NW.”

  • E&P’s Greg Mitchell writes, “Over the next week, much will be written, pro and con, about General Petraeus’s report on the progress of the ‘surge’ in Iraq and President Bush’s response. Since both men have pretty much already announced, or at least rehearsed, what they are going to say, the suspense is not exactly crippling. I’ll be writing more later, but for now I’d simply like to address the media’s responsibility to address, over the next few days, this key moment in our recent history with a steady gaze — which, as I will recount, was sadly lacking last winter in the weeks before the ‘surge’ was announced.”

  • Notions Capital reports, “After decades, Washington, DC public station WAMU-FM is sending Bluegrass and other local music programs into that ‘Lonesome Valley’ of HD Radio where there is no one to hear them. … The FCC only approved digital HD Radio multicasting on March 22nd, but National Public Radio (NPR) has been hot to trot since May 2001, even before the FCC adopted the iBiquity HD Radio standard. Public stations have used it experimentally since 2004. NPR stations are the white mice of HD Radio. NPR headquarters for HD was even named the NPR Lab.”

  • From David Adler, CEO and Founder, BizBash Media, “It has been 8 years since starting to raise the money to launch BizBash after leaving PRIMEDIA. I am so thrilled that we are publishing our biggest issue ever at 260 pages and and continue to be the largest internet source for event planners around the world. Next year we will publish more than 20 issues in 6 major market with Chicago launching in January.”

  • Huffington Post’s Jay Rosen writes, “the press is not capable of making an independent decision denying the president his spin zone with a dateline in Iraq. When the White House says we’re going, they’re going.”

  • TVWeek reports, “The staffs of weekday and weekend broadcasts of ABC’s ‘World News’ will be combined under ‘World News With Charles Gibson’ executive producer Jon Banner and senior producer Vinnie Malhotra, who will continue as executive producer of weekend editions of ‘World News.’”

  • “‘Writers @ Work: A Process Approach,’ a four-week online course first offered last fall by News University, Poynter’s distance learning program. It’s scheduled again this year for October 15 to November 9.”

  • US News & World Report photojournalist James Lo Scalzo, author of a soon-to-be published memoir, Evidence of My Existence, has created a multi media synopsis of the memoir.

  • The Bob Edwards Show produced by XM Satellite Radio won 1st place from the Society of Environmental Journalists in the Beat/In-Depth Reporting category for the documentary “Exploding Heritage.”

    Jobs

  • Hanley Wood, LLC is looking for an Assistant Production Manager.

  • U.S.News & World Report is looking for a Health & Medicine Reporter.

  • Ed2010 reports that “AOL Living, AOL Food, and AOL Stylelist are seeking fall interns to work up to 25 hours/week. … This paid internship requires that the candidate be enrolled in a degree-granting program, and interns can choose flexible hours based on class schedules. Please send resume, cover letter and clips to dori.fern@corp.aol.com.”

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 04.24.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • What do Tony Kornheiser and Scooter Libby have in common? Admittedly not much, but they did both make The Phoenix’s List of 100 Unsexiest Men, 2007.

  • Reuters reports, “The Huffington Post political blog has signed on Web media company Yahoo Inc. and online news site Slate to help host two debates among presidential hopefuls ahead of the 2008 election.”

  • The Washingtonian has more coverage from the WHCA parties here .

  • Lawmakers Urge Bush to Reconsider Broadcasting Cuts

  • Magazines, Online And Off

  • Helena Andrews reviews the fashion from the WHCA Dinner and says, “The original Wonkette, Ana Marie Cox, wore an emerald green reflective ensemble that might have looked better on the set of ‘Wicked.’” Then again, Andrews thinks Los Angeles is a great city so we’re suspicious of her judgment…

  • Rem Rieder writes, “I have two major objections to the dinner. The first is that it suggests a coziness between newsmakers and the people who cover them that just isn’t healthy. … The other problem is the carnival aspect, the competition for the get, the parade of (sort of) celebs, the coveted after-party tickets.”

  • Today, American University’s School of Communication is hosting its Finale Reception for its Mentoring Program and they are expecting a few big-name alumni/DC media including CBS News’ 48 Hours Investigates producer Susan Zirinsky, NBC 4 anchor Wendy Rieger and XM Satellite Radio’s Bob Edwards.

  • Julie Mason shows us just why the stakeout can sometimes be a bit anti-climatic.

  • A reader tells us, “If we were to follo Bruce Johnson’s well-meaning criterion, there would be no day for celebration. Each festivity would be canceled on a daily basis, based on Darfur alone. Let us remember the victims, but let us also go on living. The victims would want us to, while remembering them. It is people like Cho who would want to rob us of even these perhaps frivolous but joyful celebrations.”

  • Ralph Hanson points out that the Post “crossed a new diversity barrier” last week — “not interracial dating, they’ve done that a time or two; not gay dating — no lesbians yet, but one male-male date. No, this time they had a man in a wheelchair and a woman who was not.”

  • In one reader’s opinion, “The Politico.com redesign is awesome — the new features are full of great info and it’s much easier to navigate through the stories.” Vandi — is that you?

  • Gawker reports that near “catfight” broke out at John McLaughlin’s post-White House Correspondent’s Dinner brunch between Ana Marie Cox and Eric Alterman. “Cox confronted Alterman about recent comments he had made concerning Time’s recent hirings, specifically, the hiring of Cox.”

  • Reason Editor-in-Chief Nick Gillespie talked with National Journal’s Jonathan Rauch “about the 2008 presidential race, the Iraq War, the state of contemporary journalism, and more.”

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Taking Out The Trash, 03.19.07

  • Most of your brackets are already broken. Stupid Duke.

  • More on AssignmentZero.

  • For Bookstores, a Real Page-Turner: Digital or Paper? Take Your Pick.”

  • Look out Morning Edition

  • Deb Howell on “What Riled Readers Last Week.”

  • Radio Deal Could Face Technical Difficulties: XM, Sirius Systems Already Strained”

  • Roll Call and Gallery Watch’s CongressNow debuts today. From a tipster: “On March 19, Roll Call and GalleryWatch will launch an online publication, CongressNow, to cover legislation on Capitol Hill. We’re offering Congressional staff and other Roll Call subscribers a free preview of the kinds of articles that our reporting staff will be filing for this new publication. And for a free trial subscription to CongressNow, beginning with the first issue March 19, call us at 800-289-9331. Don’t miss a day of insider coverage!”

  • We’ll believe it when we see it: “McCain Pledges Bi-Weekly Press Conferences

  • Hotline reports, “MSNBC will mark the 4th anniv. of the beginning of the Iraq war on 3/19 with all day coverage. Anchors throughout the day will include Tim Russert, David Gregory, Andrea Mitchell, Chip Reid, Chris Matthews, Keith Olbermann, Joe Scarborough, Tucker Carlson and Norah O’Donnell. Scheduled interviews include ex-WH CoS Andy Card, Sen. Kit Bond (R-MO), ex-Gov. Mike Huckabee (R-AR), Sen. John Kerry (D-MA), Sen. Joe Lieberman (ID-CT), Rep. John Murtha (D-PA) and Rep. Patrick Murphy (D-PA) (release, 3/15).”

  • PEJ’s Talk Show Index shows that the Scooter Libby verdict dominated talk shows for the week of March 4-9, with 28% of the coverage.

  • “Washington Post Live” debuts today.

      This afternoon, “Washington Post Live” debuts (Comcast SportsNet at 5). The program features Comcast SportsNet personalities and Post sports staff writers taking on local and national sports topics. The program, seen simultaneously on http://www.washingtonpost.com, also incorporates fan interaction through e-mail questions for guests and a call-in segment. Today’s guests are Washington Capitals star Alexander Ovechkin, Washington Redskins quarterback Jason Campbell and Washington Nationals third baseman Ryan Zimmerman.

  • A reader tells us that Hillary Clinton did an exclusive interview with Bloomberg TV’s “Money & Politics” last week, and asks, “Another sign of the growing clout of the small but incredibly hardworking Bloomberg Washington bureau?”

  • Regarding this comment: “I think some more liberal Post writers probably get upset because many of the comments tear apart and rip to shreds and bring back to reality some of the articles that are obviously more liberal-leaning.” A reader (and Postie?)responds: “Nice try. But no. we get upset because we — at least i — don’t care for the horribly racist stuff some people write. It’s the washington post not a KKK chat room.”

  • NPR is hiring a Director for NPR Music, a Quality Assurance/Developer, a Design Director and a Producer for NPR Digital Media.

  • The World Bank is hiring a Web and Photography Collection Consultant and Communications Broadcast-TV Reporters.

  • The Washington Examiner has started “The List.”

  • The Chronicle of Higher Education was nominated for a 2007 National Magazine Award. Phil Semas is the editor-in-chief.

  • Ron Brownstein looks at “How the Democrats are turning on Fox News.”

  • Regarding this, a reader tells us that “Pearlstein gets paid to do the chat; he should give a better effort than ‘thanks.’”

  • An Atlantic release announced that the publication was nominated for three more nominations for editorial excellence for the 2007 National Magazine Awards. The nominations are in General Excellence, Public Interest and in the “Reviews and Criticism” category.

  • Wolf Blitzer interviewed ABC News anchor Bob Woodruff and his wife, Lee, on the Friday, March 16, edition of The Situation Room.

  • Pew’s weekly News Interest Index shows that Iraq and the state of Walter Reed dominated the public’s attention last week.

  • A reader asks, “Are there ANY *hot* single journalists in this city?”

  • A reader notes, “politico’s search tool sucks.”

  • Regarding this, a reader says, “It wasn’t the ‘annual’ photo, it was the ’25th Anniv. Photo,’ and there were not ‘about 50′ photos taken, there were exactly 12 photos taken. There were, however, many lame jokes made during the process.”

  • Webcasters Slam into Royal(ty) Pain

  • On this, a reader comments, “See ya, Cathy. She sucked. I won’t miss her. She was always crying, spitting, sweating or all of the above. She was a spaz.”

  • Eat The Press has a bone to pick with Slate.

  • ABC News reports that “Friday afternoons are the favorite time to release embarrassing information.”

  • E&P reports, “The New York Times is opening up access permanently to TimesSelect to all students and faculty who have .edu e-mail addresses beginning on March 13.”

  • The Corporate Executive Board is hiring a sales associate.

  • TIG Global is hiring a Client Services Coordinator and a Web Marketing Analyst.

  • Al Jazeera English is hiring a News Editor and a Deputy News Editor.

  • A tipster tells us, “Politico has secured a seat in the white house press room, thanks to Mike Allen.”

  • A reader tell us that NBC4.com on Friday had “Review: Rock’s ‘Wife’ Is Fun, Witty Ride… Um… funny risque pun or accidental inappropriateness?”

  • Reuters reports, “Time magazine hits newsstands on Friday with layout and design changes to attract the Web generation. A new mix of writing styles range from quick-hit bullet points to more contemplative features. “A magazine is like a buffet,” muses managing editor Rick Stengel.”

  • DMNews reports, “Research conducted by the Magazine Publishers of America says that 262 magazines were launched last year — a 2% increase over the number launched in 2005. Among the new titles were 88 lifestyle magazines. Eight of these titles made the jump from online to print.”

  • From a tipster: “Fox New’s Greta will be profiled in the August 2007 issue of Runners World.” $10 in fake FishbowlDC money for the first person to send us images…

  • The International Center for Journalists named its first class of Knight International Journalism Fellows since expanding the program to include Fellows from outside the United States. Check out the new fellows.

  • From a tipster: “Lots of talk yesterday by comics fans — angry talk — that the Post is, for some odd reason, dropping three of its most veteran — and well-liked — comic strips: ‘Mary Worth,’ which has run in the Post for least 40 years; ‘Broom Hilda,’ which has run in the Post for at least 30 years; and ‘Cathy,’ which is one of the most popular national comic strips in the country. There are at least seven or eight other comic strips in the Post that are just crap–unfunny, juvenile, badly drawn, stupid–and the Post decides to drop three very popular, veteran strips. Yes, it’s only comic strips and not war or poverty or homelessness or crime coverage, but people read the comics as a counter to hard news and for entertainment, so they do serve a purpose. But, lately, the Post’s comics pages have been just awful. And the Post wonders why it’s losing readers? Here’s another reason.”

  • David Adler, C.E.O. and Founder of BiZBash Media, announced he will launch a Washington, D.C. edition of its Web site and weekly email service on Tuesday, March 27, 2007. “The BiZBash weekly email newsletter will allow more than 10,000 local industry professionals to go behind the scenes of important D.C. events to see how others are handling everything from decor, catering, entertainment, meeting content, and strategy to other event planning ideas and resources.”

  • Taking Out The Trash, 03.14.07

  • 80 seems to be the expected age to go.

  • The National Journal’s Patrick Ottenhoff starts at the Hotline Monday as their new polling staff writer.

  • An ABC News release announced that last week “World News with Charles Gibson” was the #1 “evening newscast among key demo viewers for the 5th time in 6 weeks.” It was also the only evening newscast “to post year-to-year gains among Total Viewers, increasing 5%; NBC declined 4% and CBS dropped 12%. This is the twelfth consecutive week that ABC has grown its Total Viewing audience versus a year ago.”

  • The Hill’s Arthur Delaney gives props to the Washington Examiner.

  • An NBC release announced that “NBC Nightly News with Brian Williams” was the most-watched network evening newscast, winning the week of March 5-9, in total viewers and placing first in homes. “Nightly News’” “+44,000 total viewer win last week represents a turn around, with ABC’s advantage over NBC all but disappearing since the month of February.”

  • Fox News tells us that during yesterday’s presser on Sunday political shows, Rep. Maurice Hinchey was asked his views on the NV Dems pulling out of the debate and if he agreed with that since the point of the press conference was to look for more representation on both sides. Hinchey defended Fox News and replied, “I don’t think they should have canceled it, no. I think that all debates are important. As long as they are open and fair, they should be participating in it.”

  • Rachel Sklar asks “What The Hell Does The ‘I’ In ‘I. Lewis (Scooter) Libby’ Stand For?”

  • According to National Journal’s People Column, Tony Kreindler has moved to Environmental Defense as the national media director for its climate campaign. Kreindler was most recently president of ADRWorld.com.

  • E&P reports, “If the Los Angeles Times wins the Pulitzer Prize for criticism, it appears that it will not be won by someone the paper submitted for consideration. Although the paper nominated three writers for the honor, the most allowed by Pulitzer rules, the apparent list of finalists, E&P has learned, includes two Times scribes who nominated themselves.”

  • Radar Online’s Tony Dokoupil asks, “Has the media learned from its mistakes in Iraq?”
  • Nancy Cordes (formerly Weiner) is leaving ABC News to pick up the transportation beat for CBS News in Washington.

  • From a reader: “You may start to notice onion boxes around town. I spotted my first this morning.”

  • The Associated Press is looking for an APTN Newsperson for its Broadcast News Center in Washington, D.C.

  • The American Association for Justice is looking for an Associate Editor.

  • A reader writes in to point that out that the Politico’s Jeanne Cummings has been on front page seven issues in a row.

  • New Postie, Anne Kornblut, admits that she doesn’t watch Fox.

  • Russia Today, a 24 hour English language TV channel, is looking for a reporter.

  • ME/ME2 Magazine is looking for a new Editor-in-Chief.

  • Campaigns and Elections Magazine is accepting nominations for Rising Stars of Politics until April 9, 2007. Rising Stars are people under age 35 who are beginning to make their mark in political consulting or advocacy. Each winner will be featured in our June 2007 issue.

  • According to the PEJ News Index, the Scooter Libby verdict, and its fallout, topped the news for the week of March 4-9.

  • The Freedom Forum announced that Bob Schieffer has been named the 2007 Free Spirit Honoree. “Each year the Freedom Forum honors one or more individuals for accomplishments that have stirred the public’s hearts and souls by demonstrating the human capacity to dream, dare, do.” Schieffer will receive the award at a ceremony March 21 at the National Press Club.

  • Regarding this, a reader asks, “Regarding your top post on WaPo. Aren’t we entering the fourth year of the war in Iraq? NOT THE FIFTH?”

  • Taking Out The Trash, 03.08.07

  • It’s close, but most of you agree with the Scooter Libby verdict.

  • The Awards Committee of the American Journalism Historians Association seeks nominations for its three major awards — the Kobre Award, the Book of the Year Award for 2006, and the History Award. Nominating letters and supporting materials should be submitted by May 1, 2007, to David R. Davies, School of Mass Communication & Journalism, University of Southern Mississippi, 118 College Drive #5121, Hattiesburg MS 39406. All three awards will be given at AJHA’s 2007 annual convention to be held Oct. 10-13, 2007, in Richmond, Va

  • DCRTV has the full run down of the three month rating trends for WHUR, WTOP, WERQ radio.

  • Hilary Rosen puts a face on the Scooter Libby verdict. “Seeing Joe looking happy and fresh made me realize that so many people outside of Washington see this verdict and the events of the past few years as just about politics, not about people.”

  • The AP reports, “Legislation to make federal agencies more responsive to Freedom of Information Act requests was approved by a House panel Tuesday. The measure would restore a ‘presumption of disclosure’ standard that would commit agencies to releasing requested information unless there is a finding that such a disclosure could do harm.”

  • The NY Post reports, “PBS is taking a minority stake in V-me, a Spanish-language digital cable network. The deal with V-me, which airs on public television stations nationwide, extends PBS’ reach into the burgeoning Hispanic media market. V-me is distributed in 28 million homes in 18 U.S. markets.”

  • Market Watch reports, “Yahoo is in discussions to deepen its advertising-sharing arrangements with 225 newspapers, says CFO Sue Decker. She inferred the negotiations are focused on letting Yahoo share more than just the newspapers’ ads. ‘We are in discussions for more content,’ she says.

  • The AP reports, “New York Times Co. sees its digital revenue rising 30% this year to $350 million, fueled by ad sales at the company’s newspaper Web sites and its About.com. The company says it expects to save up to $75 million in 2007 through staff cuts, lower newsprint costs and greater productivity.”

  • Wall Street Journal reports that National Geographic is launching a new cellphone service. The “Talk Abroad Travel Phone allows customers to buy or rent a phone and then pay in advance for minutes. The service will work in more than 100 countries. However, past efforts to turn a brand name into a successful cellphone service have seen mixed results.”

  • A reader asks, “Say, whatever happened to ‘National Journal 2.0?’ They’ve stopped promoting the supposedly fancy new website they were supposed to launch, haven’t they?”

  • New York Times reports that FCC Chair Kevin Martin “is said to be privately questioning Congressional testimony by Mel Karmazin that post-merger subscribers of Sirius and XM satellite radio would both pay the same monthly rate and receive more programming.”

  • According to the Wall Street Journal, “The media-reform activist group Free Press is having success blocking efforts by U.S. regulators to adopt measures supported by media companies. In February, the group attracted 3,000 activists and bloggers to Memphis for workshops and speeches from the likes of Bill Moyers.”

  • Business Week reports, “A decision by the U.S. Copyright Royalty Board to hike royalty fees could put some small online radio stations out of business. Under a new rule, online radio outfits will begin paying on a per-song, per-listener basis, which could raise royalty fees more than tenfold.”

  • DCRTV “hears that DC-based XM Satellite Radio will be launching a channel for St. Patrick’s Day — XM Green: Radio Ireland. The channel (XM-200) will exist from 3/16 to 3/18 and will feature ‘the true sounds of Ireland – from traditional music by the Clancy Brothers to contemporary artists such as Celtic Thunder.’ Former HFSer Lou Brutus is XM’s rock music programming director and he’ll be overseeing XM Green.”

  • Harry Jaffe wonders if the Washington Post’s Ivan Carter will follow Mike Wilbon, Ric Bucher, and Dave Aldridge to television.

  • A reader notes, “After one week on the job, why is the Politico still excluding their best reporter, Jeanne Cummings, from the masthead?”

  • We goofed. It was the Conde Nast Media Group who created and brought the CIT program Behind the Business to Conde Nast Portfolio, Wired, Golf Digest and New Yorker. Sorry Conde Nast. For more, click here.

  • Taking Out The Trash, 03.06.07

  • Working in jammies is oh so very appealing.

  • More reporters embrace an advocacy role

  • An NBC release announced that Alexandra Wallace has been named executive producer of “NBC Nightly News with Brian Williams,” making Wallace the first woman to lead a weeknight network evening newscast in a decade. She will continue to serve as NBC News Vice President.

  • Cousin TVNewser reports that CNN & MSNBC are covering the Walter Reed story “more than twice as much as FNC.”

  • Katie Smith, formerly the Production/Copy Editor at Roll Call, has been promoted to Copy Chief.

  • PC World has The 50 Most Important People on the Web. “Despite what Time magazine would have you believe, you are not the most powerful or influential person on the Web.”

  • TNR’s Jonathan Chait questions the placement of this Washington Post story. Front page material?

  • Modern Luxury is hiring a senior editor for DC Magazine.

  • David Greenberg has the “Trial and Error” of the Scooter Libby trial.

  • Check out the new blog, Front Lines, written by Marshall Young, who is a private security contractor based in an undisclosed location in Iraq, well outside the Green Zone.

  • Conde Nast Media Group came another step closer to launching Conde Nast Portfolio, by signing a multiplatform communications program with CIT called Behind the Business, which will deliver profiles on business luminaries in Wired, Conde Nast Portfolio, Golf Digest and The New Yorker. Webcasts featuring the live interviews will be available on CIT’s Web site, beginning April 9, 2007 and thereafter on demand.

  • Has anyone else noticed that the Politico is now using stories from the Des Moines Register, The State and the Las Vegas Sun?

  • And why have no Politico’rs appeared on “Face the Nation” since February 9? Is that relationship over?

    >UPDATE: DCRTV has a theory:

      Perhaps it’s because the Politico’s owner, Allbritton, which also owns DC’s ABC affiliate WJLA, has moved ABC’s “This Week” from 9 AM to 10 AM, to directly compete with CBS’s rival “Face” on WUSA…..

    >UPDATE: The relationship may not be as split as we thought: A reader writes in to point out that Josephine Hearn was on “Face” February 18.

  • PR Week has an interview with Politico.com Editor in Chief John Harris.

  • Taking Out The Trash, 03.05.07

  • Has Anna Nicole Smith finally lost her intrigue?

  • ABC News nipping at NBC’s heels

  • Amy Gahran asks a good question. “Why is it that I’ve never seen a public broadcasting site that accepts donations made via Paypal?”

  • PFAW and Political Clout Productions announced, “On Saturday, March 17 at 7:00 p.m. at the Tishman Auditorium, 66 West 12th St. in New York City, Valerie Plame will make the first public appearance since the beginning of the Scooter Libby trial to discuss her life, her career, and the personal battle she and her husband, Ambassador Joseph Wilson are fighting against the most powerful officials in the nation.” She will be interviewed by MSNBC’s Keith Olbermann.

  • Slate’s Jack Shafer introduces readers to Slate’s fact-check department. “It works for nothing, and its name is Auros.” RM “Auros” Harman to be exact.

  • The Minneapolis-St. Paul Star Tribune is looking for a Washington bureau reporter.

  • American University’s School of Communication (SOC) and the Center for Public Integrity are accepting applications to their joint Fellowship in Investigative Journalism. The fellowship starts in September 2007.

  • Also, National Geographic is looking for a Picture Editor.

  • Check out the second episode of 1/2 Hour News Hour, or at least a clip of it anyway.

  • The PEJ Talk Show Index for the week of February 18-23 shows that while Anna Nicole Smith dominated the cable talk shows, “their radio counterparts opted for another favored subject—and it was open season on the 2008 campaign season.”

  • Eric Boehlert has the good news, and the bad news, on TNR’s new owner, CanWest Global Communications.

  • Craig Silverman, journalist and originator of the website RegretTheError.com, has a book (also entitled “Regret The Error”) coming out this fall.

  • “‘This American Life’ Moves to Television

  • Nat Geo Programming Chief To Step Down

  • A Powerful Story at Walter Reed” says Deborah Howell.

  • Maybe Erik Wemple was on to something when he so quickly left the Village Voice.

  • More insight into Time magazine’s “witching hour.”

  • And, of course, the best news: Geico’s cavemen are getting their own TV pilot.

  • From the WSJ:

      Former Attorney General John Ashcroft, who sent a letter this week to his successor Alberto Gonzales blasting the proposed merger of Sirius Satellite Radio Inc. and XM Satellite Radio Holdings Inc., approached XM in the days after the merger was announced offering the firm his consulting services, a spokesman for XM said Saturday.

  • From DCRTV:

      Korny Does XM – 3/5 – Superstar Washington Post sports columnist and radio god Tony Kornheiser debuts on DC-based XM Satellite Radio today. His 8:30 AM to 10:30 AM Washington Post Radio show gets aired continent-wide with a half-hour delay from 9 AM to 11 AM on XM-144, Sports Nation…..

  • Taking Out The Trash, 03.01.07

  • So it seems that most of you are unimpressed by your colleagues. Almost half of you genuinely like 30% or less of the folks in your newsroom.

  • Farewell, George Michael.

  • C-SPAN announced the launch of C-SPAN Classroom, “enabling educators and students to closely track the issues and candidates.” Every week, C-SPAN Classroom posts free, downloadable video clips of candidate speeches and other events from the campaign trail that are “classroom-ready”, “and culled from C-SPAN’s noted political coverage, including its signature program, ‘Road to the White House.’”

  • AP reports, “The Washington Post Co. reported a 7 percent drop in fourth-quarter earnings Wednesday as increased expenses in its education division offset higher revenues.”

  • McClatchy determined a new scale for the annual cash bonus of some of the companies top brass. Check it out here.

  • Cox’s Window On Washington reports that the Electronic Frontier Foundation filed suit Tuesday in U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia to obtain the records that the Justice Department “has repeatedly refused to turn over records requested under the Freedom of Information Act about the oversight of the president’s domestic eavesdropping program.”

  • Cousin TVNewser has the complete schedule for Bob and Lee Woodruff’s media junket for the next few weeks.

  • FNC’s Dana Klinghoffer has been promoted to Manager of Media Relations.

  • Sen. Rick Santorum to become a columnist?

  • Journalism professor Matthew Taylor has a “sobering message” about he learned from the Scooter Libby trial — a federal shield law is necessary for reporters — “not going to happen.”

  • Check out Stephen Talbot’s online Washington Post chat on the third part of the PBS Frontline series “News War: What’s Happening to the News.”

  • A tipster writes, “To the whiners upset that the NPC discrimination wasn’t put in ‘context’ — glad that you’ve had seven women presidents. I still get 77 cents to your dollar. ‘Discrimination in the past?’ Please…. Go take a survey of how many women are WH correspondents or Ex Producers. Women are still the most under-represented segment of society in board rooms, on television, in Congress etc etc. Stop whining and start hiring and promoting …”

  • And another tipster points out that for Wednesday’s papers the page counts were as follows — The Hill: 56 pages, Roll Call: 52 pages, Politico: 24 pages.

  • Taking Out The Trash, 02.15.07

  • Most of you knew there would be no snow, and most of you are not married. Except for this reader: “I’m dating somebody, married. Are you asking me if I’m dating somebody who is married? Do I LOOK like Washingtonienne? (Sadly, I do not.)”

  • And to this reader: “I have a huge crush on Tucker Carlson. Where does he hang out and when? Hook a girl up with this knowledge on Valentine’s Day, mmkayy???” Sorry to break it to you, but he is married.

  • Boston Globe’s Alex Beam offers a “handy field guide” to the Scooter Libby proceedings.

  • Ah…the Capitol Hill newspaper cat-fight continues…From tipsters:

      -About The Hill’s first Friday paper: “1) They have no ads. They were the only paper out today, they’ve been hyping this for weeks and yet they only had one full-page national ad (on the back page) and one retail ad (on page two). 2) The Hill’s stated reason for coming out Fridays is that Congress will be here Fridays. But neither the House nor the Senate was in today. 3) Their front-page note you copied earlier said the Hill was ‘a daily when Congress is in session.’ But that’s not true. They still don’t come out Mondays, even though both chambers have been working Mondays.”

      -”STOP IT: Hill’s Friday paper has ONE ad. Merrill Lynch. And it’s part of what is literally referred to as the ‘Roll Call Campaign.’ You know, like Kleenex and Xerox: an ad campaign to reach Congress is a ‘Roll Call Campaign’. Yes, i used to work for Roll Call. But this is true and objective. Let’s see how long Hill prints Fridays with no revenue attached.”

      -”Is it me, or does the Politico’s e-mail system not work–despite signing-up for all their e-mails on the launch date, I’ve never received any e-mails from them?”

      -”Allbritton: ‘While other publications put out press releases about new plans to cover the complex world of lobbying only to hire young reporters with scant experience…’ What publications? What is he talking about?”

      -The Aging of America Policy Briefing in Roll Call today…’Oh let me tear into to this first thing on a Monday morning!’ pause pause pause NOT! Didn’t The Hill cover this like two weeks ago?

      -”Have you noticed all the (expensive) AP photos in the Politico? Didn’t they hire a photographer from The Hill? And why don’t they credit their pix online?”

      -”Have you looked at the Politico’s photos. Check out today’s paper — a whole bunch of pricey AP pics, many uncredited photos, and only 1 picture by a member of their photo department. Until you get to the photo page, which just happens to be pictures from a Politico party (and features 4 Politico staffers). That’s how they use their photographers?”

  • The readers have spoken. Hotline deserves the props along with “the news staffs who spend all day today in the office preparing to publish their respective publications tomorrow!”

  • Although apparently the delivery guys had some problems today. A reader notes, “The 28 people it took to write the A1 story in today’s WaPo. But not the NYT delivery guy. he never made it this morning.”

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