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Posts Tagged ‘So What Do You Do?’

Jesse Ventura on His Possible Run for President in 2016

Jesse-Ventura-ArticleWhen Jesse Ventura has something to say, you better believe he’s going to be heard. This Vietnam vet turned pro wrestler and former governor of Minnesota is currently the host of Ora TV’s Off the Grid, where he tackles everything from his disdain for the country’s two-party system to the problem with the mainstream media.

In our latest So What Do You Do article, we spoke to Ventura about why the major networks have “blackballed” him, his friendship with Andrew Napolitano and if he will, in fact, run for president in 2016:

You never say never. I don’t really have an intention of doing it, and if I did do it, I’d have to do it my way. And that would require an extreme grassroots movement. I would run under no party whatsoever. There is no Reform Party anymore; it doesn’t exist. I would run under no party on purpose and here’s why: that would be the essence of my entire campaign. I would challenge the American people to make history and elect the first president since George Washington who does not belong to a political party. Can you imagine that?

For more from Ventura, including his thoughts on the media’s coverage of political issues, read: So What Do You Do, Jesse Ventura, Political Pundit and Host of Ora TV’s Off the Grid?

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Keija Minor, Editor-in-Chief of Brides on Her Jump From Law to Publishing

keija-minor2Keija Minor has come a long way from her initial career as a corporate lawyer. This D.C. native left the world of law around 2003 and took a major pay cut to start over again as a magazine intern. Her leap of faith paid off: she’s now the editor-in-chief of Brides.

In the latest installment of Mediabistro’s So What Do You Do?, Minor discusses her vision for Brides, being inspired by artistic director Anna Wintour and how she transitioned from law to publishing:

How did you make the move from corporate law to magazines?
There is literally a book called What Can You Do With a Law Degree? that was sticking out on a shelf at Barnes & Noble, and I was like, ‘Oh my gosh, it’s a sign!’ So I decided basically by the end of year two [of my job as a lawyer] that I needed to look for something else, and then it took a year to save a year’s worth of mortgage payments, with my theory being that I may be broke and not be able to eat, but I won’t be homeless. And I actually started taking [women's magazine] classes at Mediabistro. Once I made up my mind that that’s what I wanted to do, it was like this huge burden was lifted off my shoulders — I had five minutes of regret about two minutes after I left the firm.

To hear more from Minor, including what it’s like to be the first African American to hold a top position at Condé Nast, read: So What Do You Do, Keija Minor, Brides Editor-in-Chief?

Shirley Halperin, Music Editor For THR, On Interviewing Bieber

ShirleyHalperinShirley Halperin has interviewed plenty of artists throughout her career. As the sole music editor for The Hollywood Reporter, she’s gotten backstage access to some of the most famous people in the world. But it was Justin Bieber who proved especially hard to get a hold of. Halperin had already interviewed the Beebs in 2011 (she recalls when he was “just this sweet little kid”).

In the latest installment of Mediabistro’s So What Do You Do?, Halperin dishes on all things Bieber:

How did the interview come about?
This is a story I had been chasing for a long time, five or six months. [His PR team] finally gave us the opportunity, and I think a lot of that is a testament to The Hollywood Reporter. It’s really such a huge get. I did the interview with him in person, just before he left for South America, where all the craziness has happened. It was definitely a matter of convincing the Bieber camp that this would be a good forum for him, where he could not necessarily defend his actions, but defend his art.

To read more about Halperin’s impressions of Bieber and her thoughts on working with Janice Min, read: So What Do You Do, Shirley Halperin, Music Editor For The Hollywood Reporter?

How Soledad O’Brien Would Have Covered the Government Shutdown

SoledadOBrienSoledad O’Brien, the former CNN morning anchor, now has another label to add to her already impressive resume: CEO. O’Brien recently launched Starfish Media Group, a multiplatform company that has already garnered partnerships with HBO, Al Jazeera America and CNN.

In the latest installment of Mediabistro’s So What Do You Do?, O’Brien talks about the challenges of being your own boss, gives advice to undergrads and tells why journalists should follow their passion:

What would the field look like if journalists could spend the bulk of their time reporting on their areas of passion? How would that translate to the information and the consumers of that information?

I’ll give you an example. Let’s talk about a “shut down the government” story. Most channels are going to be sitting in D.C. going back and forth like, “Here’s John Boehner and the president.” That’s really going to be your coverage, as if the entire world revolves around Washington. As much as they can shut down the government, the impact is not going to be felt solely there. You could tell that story through the communities that are going to be affected. I think that right there, if you told it that way, you could really change the debate that’s going on in the news.

To hear more from O’Brien, read: So What Do You Do, Soledad O’Brien, CEO of Starfish Media Group?

– Aneya Fernando

How Quarterly.Co Helps Bloggers: Revenue!

MitchLowe

Mitch Lowe, co-founder of Netflix and former president of Redbox, knows a thing or two about how to create a successful business. Now, he’s the CEO Quarterly.Co — a subscription service that lets people receive physical items in the mail from influential contributors of their choice. They include everyone from musicians to bloggers, entrepreneurs to artists. Marie Claire creative director Nina Garcia and Bill Nye the Science Guy are the company’s most recent sign-ups.

In the latest installment of Mediabistro’s So What Do You Do?, Lowe talks about how the service helps media pros:

How do you think the journalists, authors, bloggers or the media outlets themselves benefit from participating?

In a couple ways. The revenue is one. Right now they get a substantial percentage of the profits. And in addition, they are able to build their fan base and their brand in a whole new way, in a way that’s not currently possible to do. In addition, many of them participate in some of the products — they might own or they might be a sponsor of some of the products that they put in there — so they benefit because our subscribers are highly influential people. I can’t tell you the names of people, but they are people who anybody would love to have their products in the hands of.

For more, read: So What Do You Do, Mitch Lowe, Co-Founder of Netflix and CEO of Quarterly.Co?

– Aneya Fernando

Jamie McCarthy, Celebrity Photographer: The Anti-TMZ

Jamie-McCarthy_crop

Jamie McCarthy has been taking pictures of celebrities since before the digital camera was born. For 17 years he’s been snapping flattering, red carpet shots of celebs who soon become friends.

McCarthy was mentored by his uncle, the storied nightlife and celebrity photographer Patrick McMullan. He recently spoke to Mediabistro about a recent photo shoot (Nicole “Snooki” Polizzi was involved), photographers that have influenced his work and the rise of TMZ:

Has the rise of TMZ affected the way you do your job?
Not really. My team of photographers at Getty, we’re kind of like the anti-TMZ. We’re the guys that are pretty much on the inside. So we’re the guys who want to do the nice photos and make them look good, whereas TMZ and those guys I feel like they’re looking more for the dirt on celebrities. My clients hire me because they know they can trust me and I’m not going to give up secrets about them and I make them look good. I want people who see the photos to say, ‘Wow, she looks beautiful’ or ‘He’s great-looking.’ Also, I only shoot at events where people are expecting photographs to be taken. I’ve never tried to shoot people in their personal lives. That’s not my style.

For more, read: So What Do You Do, Jamie McCarthy, Celebrity Photographer?

– Aneya Fernando

How the Founder of Pitchfork Made It Big

Way back in 1995, Ryan Schreiber was a high school graduate working as a record store clerk. Finding little on the Internet about indie music, he decided to start his own Web page and launched Pitchfork. With no publishing experience, the site eventually became the online authority on indie music, and nowadays a review there can make or break a career.

In the latest installment of Mediabistro’s So What Do You Do? series, Schreiber says that aspiring entrepreneurs should “be willing to put in the work for a long period of time for just the love of it.”

“Today, more so than any other time, it seems really difficult to make a living in the media, especially in the music media,” he explained. “It’s just so crowded, and at this point the publications that are really able to establish themselves are the ones that are the most passionate and the most relatable. I find that the publications I tend to connect with most are ones that are, in many cases, written by a single voice, somebody who has a really interesting viewpoint or perspective.”

Read the full interview in So What Do You Do, Ryan Schreiber, Founder and CEO of Pitchfork?

Sportscaster Jim Lampley on Being ‘Persuaded’ To Blog About Politics

After using an incorrect source in his post about the Iraq War for Huffington Post, sports broadcasting heavyweight Jim Lampley faced backlash from readers. But, for the host of HBO’s Fight Game, that scenario — and covering politics, in general — was never in his game plan.

“I had been persuaded to do it by someone very high up in political media who has specific purpose in mind for me. At the end of the day, I decided I wasn’t interested in that purpose,” Lampley said in mediabistro.com’s latest So What Do You Do? interview.

Lampley also touched on media personalities voicing their personal views or politics. “I guess it would be a little hypocritical of me to say they shouldn’t. I used to always prefix any political or social comments I made on the radio by saying, ‘I’m about to give you my personal opinion. I happen to be a commentator by trade, not an editorialist… so you take it as you see fit.’ And then from time to time I would speak out.”

Read the full interview: So What Do You Do, Jim Lampley, Host of HBO World Championship Boxing?