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Posts Tagged ‘Susan Dentzer’

Morning Reading List, 04.04.08

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Good morning Washington. It’s Kitty Kelley’s birthday and the 40th anniversary of Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.’s assassination.

Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | WEST WING REPORTAGE | JOBS

  • Ok, so maybe you can’t run, but you can do 20 push ups non-stop.

  • Today’s “Angry Journalist” rant of the day: “I’m angry because I’ve had nothing to do for the last three hours. But because ‘something might happen,’ I need to stay here — on the clock — wasting my own time and the company’s money.”

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • A release announced, “Veteran newsman Richard Willing has joined the Office of the Director of National Intelligence as its Director of Public Affairs. Willing, 59, covered civil and criminal justice issues, as well as intelligence and national security, for USA Today from 1997 until this January.”

  • NewsHour with Jim Lehrer announced that Betty Ann Bowser will be the new Health Correspondent. She will replace Susan Dentzer, who is the new Editor-in-Chief of Health Affairs.

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    NEWSPAPERS

  • Bloomberg reports, “News Corp. Chairman Rupert Murdoch said a purchase of the Long Island newspaper Newsday would give his New York Post a ‘more secure future’ and help compete with the New York Times for advertising.”

  • Politico’s Michael Calderone reports, “WashPost’s Dan Balz considers buyout”

  • Reuters reports, “Tribune Co is at risk of defaulting on its debt in as little as 18 months if the newspaper business deteriorates further, and it fails to unload more properties.”

  • Forbes.com reports, “Thinner. Lighter. Skinnier. There’s a good chance your daily newspaper is a lot easier to lift off your front stoop than it used to be. Economic pressures and competition are brutal, forcing newspapers to slim down. Industry experts warn that editorial quality could suffer. But does dieting have to be a negative development? No.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “Tribune Co. Chairman Sam Zell will have to sell assets besides the Chicago Cubs baseball team and its Newsday newspaper on Long Island to pay back debt maturing in 2008 and 2009, bond research firm Gimme Credit said.”

  • A White House press release announced, “The New York Times Mistakes Its Own Blindness For Presidential ‘Invisibility’ –
    Apologist For Democrat-Led Congress’ Inaction, Paper Criticizes President Bush For Public Unawareness Of Housing Event Old ‘Gray Lady’ Forgot She Failed To Cover”

  • Romenesko reports, “A study of blogs and audience engagement during the week before the fall 2006 elections found that most newspaper staff-produced blogs contained a small number of postings, failed to create much interaction between the blogger and the audience and attracted few audience comments. ‘Newspapers might consider spending staff time monitoring blogs as sources of news rather than trying to re-create the blogosphere on their websites,’ says j-prof Lori Demo.”

  • Politico reports, “WSJ may endorse in ’08; first time since Hoover!”

  • City Paper’s Mike DeBonis reports, “On Monday morning, the Washington Post flooded the proverbial zone on its Nationals Park coverage — more than 20 reporters documented every last aspect of the ballpark’s first official major-league game. The Post also flooded the paper with an inaccuracy: that the stadium cost $611 million.”

  • From a Postie regarding this, “How many pulitzers do you think the post will lose in the buyouts? Sue Schmidt is just the first band in that parade.”

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    TV

  • TVNewser reports, “The AP reports Hillary Rodham Clinton and Barack Obama have accepted the invitation of CBS News and the North Carolina Democratic Party to debate on April 27. The 90-minute debate will follow 60 Minutes and be moderated by Katie Couric and Bob Schieffer.”

  • The Baltimore Sun reports, “For decades, local TV stations in cities like Baltimore were cash cows for the companies that owned them. Even though one or two stations with the most popular anchors often came to dominate each market, everybody made money. Local TV was that surefire a business — even for last-place and poorly managed stations. But not today.”

  • TVNewser reports, “The number one network morning show last week was again NBC’s Today show. All three networks saw increases in their A25-54 demo viewership.”

  • TVNewser reports, “A producer/reporter working for the Brian Ross investigative unit at ABC News was roughed up Tuesday as he tried to get an interview with a West Virginia energy company executive. The unidentified producer, DV camera in hand, was trying to get an interview with Don Blankenship, the CEO of Massey Energy.”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Tech Crunch reports, “As Al Gore’s Current Media gets ready for its IPO, the cable channel is drawing more on its Website audience for TV content. Today, it is launching Current News, a three-minute wrap-up culled from audience submissions on the Web that will play every hour on Current TV. As such, the site now has a new look, with the audience contributions front and center. Each one can be voted up the page, and at the very top are the most popular, which get packaged together every hour on TV in the new Current News segment. The video can also be seen on the Website.”

  • ClickZ.com reports, “A classified ad industry research firm says Craigslist could ‘easily’ rake in $100 million with a few minor changes to improve service. The company, Classified Intelligence of Altamonte Springs, Fla., estimates Craigslist’s 2008 revenue will be about $81 million this year, a figure Classified Intelligence Principal Peter Zollman called ‘amazing’ in light of the laid-back operations of the mostly-free classifieds Web site.”

  • Wired.com reports, “Google argues that the plummeting click-through rates on its ads are a good thing — but advertisers aren’t buying it. A major change Google made in early March to its AdWords algorithm is resulting in a double whammy for some advertisers: The rates they’re paying for ads have rocketed while conversion rates for those ads have dropped. Disgruntled advertisers have dubbed the move the ‘Google slap.’”

  • Politico reports, “Gawker uses Nielsen data to chart the political leanings of news web site readers. Mother Jones is found to bring in the most liberal, with Fox News topping the conservatives.”

  • Slate’s Jack Shafer is “Grumbling about the misuse of hyperlinks on news sites.”

  • TVWeek.com reports, “Ads embedded in YouTube videos perform just as well as ads on television, Google said. Those are the findings from a study commissioned by Google to measure the effectiveness of 30-second ads on YouTube, on TV and embedded into content online. Harris Interactive conducted the study.”

  • Reuters reports, “Yahoo Inc on Wednesday unveiled new features to make Web search easier and more relevant to mobile phone users, the latest step in its battle with Google Inc in the next frontier for Web use.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “Google Inc. reported the biggest workforce reduction in its nine-year history, cutting jobs at DoubleClick Inc., the online advertising company it bought last month for $3.24 billion”

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    RADIO

  • DCRTV reports, “DC-based XM Satellite Radio joins with EWTN Global Catholic Network to launch a six-day channel covering Pope Benedict XVI’s visit to the USA, including a major public event at DC’s new Nationals Field. It’ll be on XM-120 from 4/15 to 4/20″

  • The New York Times reports,Randi Rhodes, an afternoon host for the progressive Air America radio network, was suspended Thursday after repeatedly insulting Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton at an event last month.”

  • Also from DCRTV, “DC-based lefty radio talker Bill Press releases his latest book, ‘Trainwreck: The End Of The Conservative Revolution (And Not A Moment Too Soon),’” today.

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    WEST WING REPORTAGE

  • TVNewser reports, “When You Think GQ, You Think… Karl Rove, right? The former Bush deputy chief of staff and current Fox News contributor is featured in a lengthy Q&A by Lisa DiPaulo on GQ’s web site today. Rove describes his new job at FNC as ‘odd.’ ‘It’s weird for me,’ he says. ‘But it’s interesting.’

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    JOBS

  • National Women’s Law Center is looking for a Communications Mgr.

  • National Public Radio is looking for a Staff Tax Accountant.

  • Smithsonian Magazine is looking for an Editorial Intern.

  • The Roanoke Times is looking for an Editorial Writer.

  • PBS Interactive is looking for a Senior Designer, PBS KIDS GO! Broadband.

  • PBS is looking for a Production Associate and an Assistant Director, Program Project Management.

  • The Advisory Board Company is looking for Staff Writers for Online Daily Health Publication.

  • The Capitol Hill Current/Voice of The Hill is looking for a full-time reporter.

  • Congressional Quarterly is looking for a Committees Reporter.

  • Georgetown University is looking for a Senior Writer/Editor.

  • Association of Governing Boards is looking for a Writer/Editor.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

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    Morning Reading List, 04.03.08

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    Good morning Washington. Perez Hilton is a WHCA guest! And Donatella Versace, too! And it’s the birthday of Politico’s Jonathan Martin and Mike Allen’s Mom. Speaking of Jonathan Martin’s b-day, Mike Allen has this to say: “Without J-Mart, Politico readers would know a lot less and the campaign trail would have a lot fewer exclamations of ‘SOLID!’ and ‘SO GOOD!’ (Martin’s the last person we know who carries a checkbook in his back pocket.) No truth to the rumor that TAGG ROMNEY will jump out of the cake. But KEVIN MADDEN has a touching tribute: ‘Happy Birthday to Jonathan Martin — a guy who has Patrick O’Connor’s style, John Bresnahan’s charm, a face for radio and a brain that should be left for science.’”

    Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

    REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | NEWS NOTES | WEST WING REPORTAGE | JOBS

  • Most of you cannot run three miles non-stop.

  • Today’s “Angry Journalist” rant of the day: “With the exception of the Wall Street Journal, most of today’s print mass media is biased crap, agenda-based sensationalism, mere entertainment. I do believe there is a market for solid journalism (objective and fact-based), but readers like myself have to look pretty hard to find it.”

  • Washington Post reports, “Leon Walczak, 61, a retired Washington bureau chief for Business Week and a writer and editor who specialized in national politics, died March 28 of pancreatic cancer at Suburban Hospital in Bethesda.”

  • Also from The Washington Post, “Betty Miles James, 84, one of the first female reporters at the Washington Star, died March 18 of congestive heart failure at Ingleside at Rock Creek, a Northwest retirement community.”

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • A tipster tells us that Martha Wright, director of design for the Washington Post’s Style section, recently quit to move to Chicago.

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    NEWSPAPERS

  • “Democrats dominated election coverage by about a six-to-one margin over Republicans in a week when making headlines was not necessarily a good thing, according to a Project for Excellence in Journalism study of campaign coverage from March 24-30.”

  • Vanity Fair’s Michael Wolffe reports, “The Sulzberger family would never let go of The New York Times. Or would it? With the latest shareholder assault on the ‘invulnerable’ paper’s management — this one from a couple of upstart hedge funds—the author plays out the most likely (and unlikely) scenarios.”

  • Wonkette reports, “Mystical Pennsylvania Foodstuffs Confuse NYT Reporter”

  • Mad.co.uk reports, “The Wall Street Journal (WSJ), owned by Rupert Murdoch’s News Corp since December, is set to sell its US print edition in London, the first time the newspaper has been printed in Europe.” Romenesko has more.

  • Eric Boehlert says “Fact: The press tuned out Iraq.”

  • Joe O’Connell, a Special Contributor to The Dallas Morning News
    reports, “What happens if the newspaper presses stop rolling? That’s the big question behind the documentary Stop the Presses: The American Newspaper in Peril, which has its world premiere today at the AFI Dallas International Film Festival.”

  • Slate’s Jack Shafer writes about the New York Times, “The paper’s design director defends its expanded summary pages.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “A U.S. Senate committee plans to vote April 24 on a measure to reverse federal rules that let companies such as Tribune Co. own a broadcast station and daily newspaper in the 20 largest markets.”

  • E&P’s Steve Outing writes, “I stopped getting the print edition of my local newspaper this month. Among my new-media expert colleagues, I’m behind the curve with that move; many gave up the print habit long ago. But compared to the general population, I’m still ahead of most folks. I admit, I feel a bit guilty about this. After all, I write for and offer advice to newspapers on an industry website.”

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    TV

  • A NBC release announced, “MSNBC ends March 2008 tied for #2 in primetime in the advertiser-friendly 25-54 demographic, the best monthly finish for MSNBC compared to CNN since May 2001. In primetime, there is a true three-way race in cable news, with only 66,000 viewers A25-54 separating first and second place. MSNBC also delivered its best-ever quarterly weekday primetime ratings in 1Q08 in total viewers, and best in the 25-54 demographic since 4Q01.”

  • An ABC release announced, “For the week of March 24-28, ‘ABC’s World News with Charles Gibson’ was the #1 evening newscast among Adults 25-54 and tied for first place among Total Viewers. The ABC broadcast averaged a 2.1/8 and 2.55 million among key demo viewers, outperforming NBC’s ‘Nightly News’ by 90,000. Among Total Viewers, ABC and NBC both averaged 8.41 million.”

  • The New York Times reports, “The historic and long-running presidential campaigns of Senator Barack Obama and Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton have injected issues of race and gender into politics as never before. With campaign coverage center stage on the cable channels, producers and critics are again assessing the diversity among pundits, who talk (and talk) about things like Mr. Obama’s pastor, the Hispanic vote, Iraq and the economy.”

  • Politico looks at the upcoming Radio and Television Correspondents’ Association dinner.

  • TVNewser reports, “FNC was the fourth ranked cable network during the first quarter of 2008 (during prime time), despite not hosting a debate during the time period. CNN, who hosted four highly rated debates, finished #14 while MSNBC came in at #27.” And, “Fox News had the top five program in Total Viewers, and 15 out of the top 20, during the first quarter of 2008. The top CNN program was CNN Election Center at #6, while the top MSNBC program was Countdown with Keith Olbermann at #20. The O’Reilly Factor was the top program during the time period.”

  • “While CNBC continues to grow in Total Viewers, the A25-54 demo numbers continue to slide. For Q1 2008, CNBC was down in many “business day” hours (5amET-7pmET) year-to-year,” reports TVNewser.

  • “Headline News had one of its best quarters in five years in Total Viewers (today day). Also, Glenn Beck Tonight at 7pmET posted its best quarter ever in Total Viewers, while Nancy Grace’s 8pmET hour scored its best quarter ever in the A25-54 demo,” TVNewser also reports.

  • CBSNews.com reports, “CBS, reeling from disappointing earning in the last quarter has done some layoffs, at the corporate level, and separate from that, at some local O&O stations. On corporate level, TVNewser reports that CBS News has made cuts in to editorial, technical operations and the bureaus. The total cuts amount to 1 percent of the staff, the post says.”

  • TVNewser reports, “In the first quarter, Fox News Channel was the most-watched channel in all of cable news, winning both the today day and prime time categories in Total Viewers. This marks the 25th consecutive quarter in which FNC has won these categories.”

  • Also, “In addition to MSNBC tying for second in the A25-54 demo in prime time for the month of March, the network experienced a 63% year-to-year increase in weekday prime time, averaging 885,000 Total Viewers.”

  • And, “As TVNewser first reported Friday, CNN did in fact win the ad-friendly A25-54 demo in prime time for the first quarter.”

  • The Wall Street Journal reports, “Consumers appear to be turning down the volume on television purchases. As the largest specialty-electronics retailers get set to report year-end results, recent consumer surveys and comments from a TV supplier and from club stores point to slowing TV demand. The category has been among the few bright spots in big-ticket spending for the home as the economy has weakened.”

  • TVNewser’s Gail Shister asks, “Will Thrills Abound When Obama Plays Hardball?”

  • TVNewser has “5 Questions For… Hugh Downs

  • A release announced, “From his riveting radio reports of World War II to his dramatic television showdown with Sen. Joseph McCarthy, Edward R. Murrow established the gold standard for American broadcast journalism. Celebrating the centennial of the legendary broadcaster’s birth, Murrow’s son Casey Murrow and former colleagues Richard C. Hottelet and Marvin Kalb will explore Murrow’s life and legacy at 7 p.m., Thursday, April 24, 2008, in GW’s Jack Morton Auditorium, located at 805 21st St., NW. The seminar will be moderated by Michael Freedman, GW vice president and professorial lecturer in journalism and former general manager of CBS Radio Network News.”

  • The Village Voice reports, “Supposedly Democrat-Friendly MSNBC Has Let a Clinton-Hating Joe Maul New York’s Senator”

  • TVNewser asks, “Do Cable’s Pundits Reflect Diversity of Presidential Race?”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Radar reports, “Former Vanity Fair and New Yorker editor Tina Brown has more than her much-ballyhooed bio of Bill and Hillary Clinton coming down the pipeline: Radar has learned that the erstwhile ‘Queen of Buzz’ is partnering with InterActiveCorp honcho Barry Diller to launch her own news aggregator website. The site, Brown tells Radar, will have ‘no ideological stance’ and will be edited by Edward Felsenthal, the former deputy managing editor of the Wall Street Journal who is currently a consultant at Portfolio.”

  • A reader asks, “Have there been any talks of a website called Politics 2 or Politics II?”

  • The AFP reports, “They’re angry at their demanding editors. They’re angry about the mushrooming workload in shrinking newsrooms. They’re even angry about other angry journalists. But these angry journalists are happy they can now vent their frustrations to the rest of the world, courtesy of angryjournalist.com, a sort of online complaint board allowing ink-stained wretches to gripe anonymously. Ironically, their anger is partly fueled by the Internet, which has forced newspapers and television networks to reinvent themselves with painful consequences for their staffs.”

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    MAGAZINES

  • The New York Observer’s Doree Shafrir writes, “‘There’s not one path anymore,’ David Hirshey, executive editor of HarperCollins and former longtime deputy editor of Esquire magazine, said the other day. ‘Thirty years ago, you worked at a newspaper, you moved to a magazine, and then you wrote books or screenplays. Today you can be a blogger who writes books or you can be a stripper who wins an Academy Award for Best Screenplay.’”

  • The New York Observer reports, “Interviews with editors of magazines like Wired, Rolling Stone, The New Yorker, Us Weekly and several others elicited more of the same:Magazines are not, for the most part, worried about the Internet.”

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    RADIO

  • A release announced, “WAMU 88.5, America Abroad Media, and The American Interest magazine will present a special town hall entitled ‘Foreign Policy and the Presidential Election: America’s Image Problem’ at 7 p.m., Monday, April 7, at the Kay Spiritual Center on the campus of American University in northwest Washington, D.C. This event is free and open to the public.” For more, click here.

  • Matthew Felling is hosting the “The Kojo Nnamdi Show” today on DC’s National Public Radio affiliate WAMU 88.5 from 12-2pm EDT.

  • Slate’s Jack Shafer writes, “Rupert Murdoch addressed the students and faculty of Georgetown University this afternoon, explaining the ‘creative destruction’ wrought upon the news and entertainment industries by changing technology. Murdoch cast himself as a relentless competitor, which he is, who has taken on entrenched monopolies and oligopolies around the world, which is also true.”

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    NEWS NOTES

  • BtoB reports, “Despite the slowing economy, mergers and acquisitions in the media and information industries kept up a fairly strong pace in the first quarter, according to a report released Tuesday by media investment bank Jordan, Edmiston Group.”

  • NPR’s On The Media reports, “The Project for Excellence in Journalism released its annual State of the News Media report and the state of the news is strong.”

  • MarketWatch’s Jon Friedman is “Pondering the strange appeal of the Newseum”

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    WEST WING REPORTAGE

  • Washington Post’s On The Plane reports, “The White House press charter that ferries journalists, presidential staff and Secret Service agents whenever the president travels has been grounded. The chartered jumbo jet is one of the 52 Boeing-777 aircraft that United Airlines ordered out of service today until it can inspect them for possible problems with the fire suppression systems in the cargo holds. The jet is currently here in Bucharest, where President Bush is attending a NATO summit that opens tonight.”

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    JOBS

  • National Television Network is looking for a Director of Field Operations.

  • American Psychological Association is looking for a Marketing Manager, Journals Circulation.

  • AARP is looking for a Quality Associate.

  • The Hotline of National Journal Group is looking for a Staff Writer.

  • Northern Virginia Daily is looking for a Design editor.

  • Daily News-Record is looking for an Editorial Page Editor.

  • AOPA is looking for a Managing Editor.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • The Revolving Door

  • NPR’s Maria Thomas, who headed NPR’s Digital Media, is leaving NPR to join e-commerce company called Etsy. IN her farewell note, Thomas described Etsy as “an online marketplace for buying and selling all things handmade which has drawn a fair amount of attention for the intensely inviting approach it’s taking to developing an active community of people who want to earn a living by making stuff.”

  • Susan Dentzer is leaving the NewsHour with Jim Lehrer to become Editor-in-Chief of Health Affairs, a monthly health policy journal.

  • Taking Out The Trash, 03.09.07

  • An ABC release announced that “This Week with George Stephanopoulos” outperformed CBS’ “Face the Nation” with 3.04 million Total Viewers on Sunday, March 4. “This is the ninth time this season ‘This Week’ outperformed ‘Face the Nation’ in Total Viewers.”

  • Pew Weekly’s News Interest Index is up.

  • From Wake-Up Call:

      Continuing his recent obsession with purity, Chris Matthews said of a guest: “He’s as pure as the driven snow. … I’ve never met someone so pure” (“Hardball”).

  • PostieCon is ready for you.

  • Data-Planet launches. From the release:”Researchers wanting to quickly compare, trend, profile or map data from multiple federal agencies no longer need dozens of sites and several software applications. Data-Planet (www.data-planet.com), a new service of Conquest Systems Inc., offers current and historical public statistical data from many of the federal statistical producing agencies, as well as data from non-government organizations.”

  • From the NBC release: “Meet the Press with Tim Russert outperforms CBS and ABC by over one million viewers and FOX by over 2.4 million. Also tops CBS, CBS, ABC and FOX in homes and adults 25-54.”

  • Woodruff Says He Won’t Return To Iraq

  • National Book Critics Circle awards announced.

  • Washingtonpost.com unveils interactive report on Darfur crisis.

  • Blogging for dollars raises questions of online ethics

  • From DCRTV: “Former Channel 9/WUSA reporter Ellen Kingsley’s 20-year fight against breast cancer ended today in Texas.”

  • Next week is Sunshine Week!

  • Interface Media Group sold to longtime employee

  • From OpinionJournal:

      Another Man’s Victim?
      Reuters has a cute little human interest story about funny people from Vermont holding “town meetings” where they call for President Bush’s impeachment. What caught our eye was not the darling little Vermonters, though, but something in this paragraph:

      Doug Dunbebin, who walked door-to-door collecting signatures to get the question onto the town meeting ballot, said there are still unanswered questions about September 11, 2001, when hijacked plane attacks killed 2,992 people at New York’s World Trade Center, at the Pentagon and in Pennsylvania.

      That number, 2,992, looked unfamiliar to us. We went back and looked at our December item on the Associated Press’s bogus “grim milestone” (U.S. military deaths in Iraq surpassing total 9/11 deaths), and sure enough, the AP’s 9/11 count was different: 2,973 to be exact.

      What’s the difference between 2,992 and 2,973? Nineteen. It seems Reuters is counting the terrorists–or should that be “freedom fighters”?–among the victims of 9/11.

  • Did somebody just call Jonathan Yardley a “worn-out old whore”?

  • Sports reporter George Michael will appear at Nathans’ Q&A Cafe April 4.
  • A tipster makes this good point (regarding this): “The WHCA decides the seating in the briefing room, not the administration.”

  • No joke: The Politico (or as the tipster who pointed this out to us said, “self-promotico”) has its own “Fans of the Politico” Facebook page.

  • Chicago Sun-Times’ Carol Marin takes a swipe at Mark Leibovich.

  • Gallup is looking for a Internet Webcast Producer. “Candidates for this opportunity must have 2 years of experience as a producer or an associate producer. Broad knowledge of Internet production methods is helpful.”

  • The Association of Health Care Journalists announced the winners of the 2006 Awards for Excellence in Health Care Journalism. Frank Christopher, Matthew Eisen and Marc Shaffer, of PBS and Susan Dentzer, Murrey Jacobson and Elizabeth Callan, The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer, of PBS are both among the winners.

  • A reader asks, “How hard pressed is the politico for copy that it ran an full page except from Martin Tolchin’s book — which was released in July, 2006?!”

  • Another reader tells us, “I believe the Post reporter you mentioned causing some tension at the Kalb Report was actually WSJ deputy Washington bureau chief David Wessel.”

  • Washington Post’s Frank Ahrens reports, “If there’s any good news about the businesses of newspapering these days, it can be found at the industry’s littlest papers, which are doing well even as their bigger brothers founder.”

  • Noam Cohen reports that C-SPAN announced that it is “changing its copyright policy to ‘allow noncommercial copying, sharing and posting’ on the Internet of its coverage of events sponsored by Congress or any federal agency, a decision that covers about 50 percent of its material.”

  • DCRTV reports, “Superstar sports columnist Tony Kornheiser, on his two-week-old Washington Post Radio show today, was asked about his ratings: ‘I went to a station with no ratings. So if I get seven listeners they’ll carry me around like a god.’”

  • NYT Assistant Managing Editor Glenn Kramon: Sorta jealous of the Post.

  • You too can smell like us.