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Posts Tagged ‘Ta-Nehisi Coates’

The Atlantic and Aspen Institute Announce the Sixth Annual Washington Ideas Forum

Screen Shot 2014-09-17 at 13.48.22Today The Atlantic, in partnership with the Aspen Ideas Forum, announced its impressive lineup of speakers for its sixth annual Washington Ideas Forum. The two day event will take place October 29 and 30 at the Harman Center for the Arts and will cover national and international topics of importance including business, education, climate change, policy, and science and technology.

Aspen Institute president and CEO Walter Isaacson will discuss his forthcoming book The Innovators. Additional participants include Revolution founder and partner Steve Case, Whole Foods CEO Walter Robb, Cornell University president David Skorton, Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz, House of Cards screenwriter Beau Willimon, and House Intelligence Committee Chairman Rep. Mike Rogers (R-MI), among others.

The Atlantic’s James Bennet, Steve Clemons, Ta-Nehisi Coates, James Fallows, and Scott Stossel will join Bloomberg View’s Margaret Carlson and MSNBC’s Chris Matthews and Andrea Mitchell as moderators.

For a full list of participants across all topic areas, click here. Media interested in attending should start sucking up now to Alexi New for invites.

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The Atlantic Announces Record Growth for Newsstand Sales and Website Traffic

Atlantic president and editor-in-chief James Bennet and president and COO Bob Cohn yesterday announced record growth for newsstand sales and website traffic for The Atlantic. Over last year, two of this year’s issues have more than doubled 2013 sales while five issues are up 25 percent.

Ta-Nehisi Coates June cover story, “The Case for Reparations,” set a single-day audience record for a magazine story on TheAtlantic.com. Read more

Morning Splash

What’s Happening

 

— After Snowden: The Road Ahead for Cybersecurity at the American Enterprise Institute, 8:45 a.m

The Atlantic: The Case for Reparations with Ta-Nehisi Coates and Jeffrey Goldberg at 6th and I Synagogue, 7 p.m.

— World Cup 2014 Opening Games Watch Party at the National Press Club, 7 p.m.

 

 

The Revolving Door

Know someone starting or leaving a job? Let us know.

 

Fishbowl Fun Fact

 

Abraham Lincoln created the Secret Service on the day he was assassinated.

 

Front Page of the Day

DC_EXPRESS

 

 

 

Weekend Show Preview, 5.2 – 5.4

Who’s on the talk shows this weekend? Glad you asked:

Sunday:

CBS’s “Face the Nation”: Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti, author Richard Williams, CBS’s James Brown and Clarissa Ward, Michele Norris of NPR, Ta-Nehisi Coates of The Atlantic, Michael Eric Dyson of Georgetown, William Rhoden of NYT, Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC)

“Fox News Sunday”: Sen. Kelly Ayotte (R-NH), Rep. Adam Schiff (D-CA), FedEx’s Fred Smith, Robert Wolf of 32 Advisors, actor Brian Stokes Mitchell, Brit Hume, Elise Viebeck of The Hill, George Will, Jane Harman from the Wilson Center

NBC’s “Meet the Press“: Gov. Rick Perry (R-TX), Mayor of Sacramento Kevin Johnson, Chuck Todd, will.i.am, Anita Dunn, Rep. Jason Chaffetz (R-UT), Kathleen Parker of WaPo

ABC’s “This Week“: John Oliver of HBO, Van Jones of CNN, Laura Ingraham, David Plouffe, Rick Santorum, Cokie Roberts

Univision’s “Al Punto”: Fmr. President of Mexico Vincente Fox, Rep. Bob Goodlatte (R-VA), Oscar De La Hoya, Mayor of Los Angeles Eric Garcetti, Sheriff of Maricopa County, AZ Joe Arpaio, Gael García Bernal

CNN’s “State of the Union: Ana Navarro, Donna Brazile, Gwenn Ifill of PBS

Read more

‘Daddy Leave’ Topic of AtlanticLIVE Convo

tdtThe New America Foundation’s Liza Mundy and The Atlantic’s Ta-Nehisi Coates sat down Tuesday night at Sixth & I to discuss the concept of “daddy leave.” Mundy penned a piece for the mag called “The Daddy Track” that looks at paternity leave as “a transformational equalizing force that draws men into the domestic sphere while enabling women to excel at work.”

We here at FishbowlDC can barely remember to feed our dogs, so far be it from us to advise anyone on parenting. However, Coates and Mundy seemed to think this whole paternity leave thing is a good idea and should be a lot easier for both moms and dads.

“I remember when I had my kids, you have to actually get formally disabled by your physician, which always seemed really weird that just having given birth means you’re disabled,” said Mundy. “That’s how you get the 6 weeks of medical leave.”

While lots of great points were made, the greatest takeaway is that any public conversation on parenting should 100% serve booze (6th & I does not). The topic of an 18 year commitment should always be accompanied by wine.

If the issue is of great interest to you though, the conversation will appear on The Atlantic‘s website by end of week. In the meantime, you can check out Mundy’s article here.

Media Takes Sides on Zimmerman Decision

After continual media coverage of the George Zimmerman trial in the shooting of Trayvon Martin and more than 16 hours of deliberation by the jury, Zimmerman was acquitted of charges of second-degree murder and manslaughter over the weekend.

Since the shooting occurred last year, the case has been heavily followed by the media, with some outlets taking clear, strong stances. Now that the not-guilty verdict has been announced, some publications are being even more outspoken on the matter. We looked at a wide array of news organizations to analyze each publication’s own verdict of the case.

Read more

The Atlantic Wins Two From Society of Magazine Editors

The Atlantic earned two awards from the American Society of Magazine Editors on Thursday: Best Web site and Best Essay and Criticism for Ta-Nehisi Coates‘s “Fear of a Black President” piece in the September issue.

“I’m so happy for Ta-Nehisi and the entire team at The Atlantic,” M. Scott Havens, president of The Atlantic, said in a release. “It’s wonderful to be recognized by our peers for excellence in one of our oldest journalistic forms, the essay, and one of our newest—the work we do every day on TheAtlantic.com.”

Coates’s piece, an analysis on the conflict he says Barack Obama faces as the first minority president, was up against other entries from Foreign Policy, New York, The New Yorker and Orion.

Gawker Editor Stirs Pot With Pedophilia Post

Over the weekend Gawker published an article by Cord Jefferson exploring the psychological ins and outs of pedophilia. The story, headlined “Born This Way: Sympathy and Science for Those Who Want to Have Sex with Children,” used language highly graphic in nature to describe real-life sexual experiences between adults and children. Naturally, reaction to the piece was strong, many arguing that the story offered too-sympathetic a look at pedophilia.

Jefferson told FBDC that since the backlash, he had “a two-hour phone chat” with a female editor he respects. “We talked about a lot, but specifically the power of language and why the words I chose for that piece were so hurtful to so many,” he said.

The Atlantic’s Ta-Nehisi Coates wrote a response to Jefferson’s piece, charging Gawker with “soft-pedaling child-rape.” Coates wrote that he “can’t really understand how one writes that a 20-year old man ‘began a sexual relationship’ with a seven year old.” He argued that all references to “a sexual relationship” between an adult and a child should have been regarded as “rape.”

FNC contributor Kirsten Powers called the story “super troubling.”

As noted by Twitchy, the story was passed around on Twitter like a hot potato and soon the sarcastic hashtag “#GawkersNextArticle” was created. “The Klan: An Appreciation,” GOP media strategist Rick Wilson suggested. National Review‘s Greg Pollowitz recommended “How to Read 50 Shades of Gray to your Kids.”

Jefferson responded to criticism he received in a post on his Tumblr. “Using the words ‘rape’ or ‘molest’ in place of ‘sex’ is an interesting argument that, I’ll admit, I didn’t think a whole lot about while writing the piece,” Cord wrote. “My default thinking is that if you’re talking about ‘sex’ between a grown man and a prepubescent child, it should be obvious that it’s not consensual.”

He also posted an anonymous comment he received on the story that said “Thanks for the trigger, a**hole.” A “trigger” is a disclaimer that typically appears at the top of an article or other content that serves as a warning to readers of graphic material they may be about to experience.

“The trigger warning thing is actually something I brought up to my editors,” Jefferson wrote. “I directly asked if we should include one at the top of the piece, and we thought about it for a few minutes. Our final decision was that an article with “People Who Want to Have Sex with Children” in the headline was trigger enough.”

Cord didn’t come away from the criticism without learning something. To one comment on his post that questioned the word choices in the story, Jefferson said he could “honestly say you’ve enlightened me.”

UPDATE: Jefferson told us “several other friends and strangers” who say they were either raped or molested have offered criticisms on his piece. “[I]t’s going to be a while before I can process those enough to want to talk about them publicly,” he said. “Nevertheless, all the lessons I’ve been given and sought out in the past few days have been valuable and transformational, and I’m sorry for the pain I caused.”

He said, however, he would write the story again. “I’ve had several self-professed celibate pedophiles contact me to say that my piece made them feel less ashamed about themselves and more interested in getting the help they need. I’m happy for that. I’m just sorry that I hurt people in an effort to help others.”

Atlantic Digital Touts ‘Record-Setting’ Month

Forget the conventions. The powers that be at The Atlantic are giving their digital properties their own balloon drop in the form of a boastful afternoon release about their numbers.

The Atlantic‘s three digital properties posted what they are calling “a record-setting month” in August: TheAtlantic.com drew 10.8 million unique visitors, TheAtlanticWire.com  attracted 3.3 million unique visitors, and theTheAtlanticCities.com broke 1 million unique visitors for the first time since launching less than a year ago.

In a particularly bragilicious quote, Atlantic Digital Editor Bob Cohn says, “We had a terrific August on all three of our sites, both in terms of producing quality, must-share journalism and attracting our biggest-ever audiences. One thing I’m especially proud of is that no single story or set of stories drove our traffic. We were strong on all of our channels, and we did especially noteworthy work on topics ranging from the Olympics and the Mars Curiosity rover to the economy and the presidential campaign. Plus we had nice boosts from magazine stories, notably ‘Fear of a Black President’ by Ta-Nehisi Coates in our last issue.”

Using Omniture, they offered comparisons to a year ago: In August 2012, monthly unique visitors to TheAtlantic.com increased 57 percent compared to August 2011, while unique visitors were up 27 percent. (TheAtlanticCities.com launched in September 2011, so a yearly comparison is not available.)

DC Media and Ford’s Theatre’s Schizoid Personality

Our Twitter search page has been pointed at the #OReillyLincolnErrors hashtag ever since a state of national emergency broke out and we learned that Ford’s Theatre will not be selling Bill O’Reilly’s book, Killing Lincoln.

But wait! If you really, really want to buy Killing Lincoln in the place were Abraham Lincoln was actually killed (or just shot, we think — we’d check O’Reilly’s book for the answer but…), just walk upstairs. Politico (which got exclusive details from O’Reilly late yesterday), WaPo, TBD, HuffPost, WCP and NBC Washington all brought us recent stories saying that while the book is out at the National Park Service’s museum in the basement of the theater, Ford’s Theatre Society decided to sell it upstairs in their gift shop. We can only imagine how confused and frightened visitors must be by the inconsistency.

Interestingly, each of these stories has been updated since being originally posted (except HuffPost‘s which was was posted early this morning, long after the others). We smell a very clever PR person at work making sure everyone knows Killing Lincoln is only a flight of stairs away. According to NBC Washington, WaPo’s original story by Steven Levingston, who broke the story, was updated at some point, too, but doesn’t actually give readers any notice of that fact.

The Atlantic’s Ta-Nehisi Coates put it best in a late-night tweet now trending at the top our search page: “… Because there’s no real way of knowing when the Oval Office was built.”

– JUSTIN MCLACHLAN

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