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Posts Tagged ‘Tim Winter’

Sara Horowitz on What ‘Obamacare’ Means to Freelancers

When Sara Horowitz was hired as a lawyer, she was made an independent contractor and wasn’t given any benefits. Since then, she’s created Working Today, a nonprofit for uniting freelancers; Freelancers Union, an organization that promotes the needs of independent workers; and Freelancers Insurance Company, which provides health insurance. She also authored the recently released Freelancer’s Bible, a practical guide for the self-employed.

In the latest installment of Mediabistro’s So What Do You Do?, Horowitz talks about the best and worst parts of freelancing, and gives advice on networking, budgeting and getting ahead. Here’s an excerpt:

How does the re-election of President Obama and his healthcare agenda play into the future of the practice?
There are other things that are good all around, like the end of the preexisting conditions. We’re a nonprofit, and we own our own insurance company, so there are no private shareholders. I think what we’re going to see is that a lot of private equity is going to move out of the insurance business per se, because they won’t be able to make as much money. So, I think there’s going to be a lot of changes afoot in the healthcare industry.

For more, read So What Do You Do, Sara Horowitz, Founder and Executive Director of the Freelancer’s Union?

Mediabistro Course

Freelancing 101

Freelancing 101Starting December 1, learn how to manage a top-notch freelancing career! In this online boot camp, you'll hear from freelancing experts on the best practices for a solid freelancing career, from the first steps of self-advertising and marketing, to building your schedule and managing clients. Register now!

Morning Reading List, 12.19.07

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Good morning Washington. On this day in 1998, the House of Representatives sent articles of impeachment against Bill Clinton to the Senate. Oh, and Alyssa Milano turns 35. (Hat tip: MicCheckRadio)

Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | REVOLVING DOOR | JOBS

  • So far, you have already spent more than $500 on Christmas presents. Way to make us feel guilty.

    NEWSPAPERS

  • USAToday reports, “The Federal Communications Commission, overturning a 32-year-old ban, voted Tuesday to allow broadcasters in the nation’s 20 largest media markets to also own a newspaper.”

  • Frank Rich bashes political reporters.

  • A release announced, “In response to a Federal Communications Commission (FCC) vote in favor of relaxing media ownership rules and allowing companies in the top 20 national media markets to own both print and broadcast outlets, the Parents Television Council issued the following statement: ‘The PTC is deeply disappointed in the announcement today by the FCC that will effectively loosen longstanding rules for media ownership. While the ruling today will only affect a select number of US markets, even a small step in the wrong direction is a step in the wrong direction,’ said PTC President Tim Winter.”

  • Reuters reports, “A bipartisan group of U.S. senators threatened on Monday to override the Federal Communications Commission if the agency votes to loosen media ownership restrictions at a meeting scheduled for Tuesday.”

  • The Wall Street Journal reports, “With Web companies now beginning to dominate the market for local ads online, newspaper publishers are scrambling to change the way they sell ads, hiring sales teams that specialize in the digital market and creating new editorial packages to sell. But it may be a case of too little, too late. McClatchy, which publishes 31 daily newspapers around the country, is revamping its commission and incentive plans to better reward staff for online sales. Gannett now operates 50 mom-centric social-networking sites around the U.S. as part of a broader strategy to boost online revenue through what it calls ‘hyper-localized’ sites. Other publishers, from Lee Enterprises to Media General, are taking steps of their own to jump-start sales of local online ads.”

  • Mixed Media reports, “No one will be surprised when Rupert Murdoch starts meddling with the editorial machinery of The Wall Street Journal, despite a formal agreement to preserve its independence. But is he doing it already?”

  • Forbes asks, “Holy smokes–what happened to McClatchy?”

  • PEJ News Coverage Index for December 9-14 shows, “The unlikely surge of former Arkansas Governor helped generate the biggest week of coverage for the presidential campaign so far in 2007. But as Huckabee is learning, some media attention is more welcome than others. Plus, the Mitchell report turns steroid abuse in baseball into a front-page story—some might say at long last.”

  • The AP reports, “A media watchdog group said Monday that 64 journalists in 17 countries have died while covering the news in 2007 — the deadliest year in more than a decade. The Committee to Protect Journalists said in an annual report that Iraq led the list for the fifth year in a row, with 31 dead — one fewer than a year ago. Somalia was second with seven dead in 2007, and Pakistan and Sri Lanka each recorded five deaths.”

  • The Chicago Sun-Times reports, “Like most American newspapers, the Chicago Tribune has been reducing the space for news in its print edition. But unlike most papers, it plans to charge more for less.”

  • Washington Post reports, “All Eyes on Blogging Iowa Newsman”

  • “The winners of the 2008 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Awards were announced on December 17, 2007.” For full results, click here.

  • The New York Times reports, “A usual round of media self-criticism turned into a schoolyard brawl last week, as editors, reporters and bloggers traded insults over a front-page article in The Washington Post, all at the very online water cooler where they usually get their news about the industry. The Post article, which ran on Nov. 29, was about rumors of Barack Obama’s ties to the Muslim world. The piece drew widespread criticism: the Columbia Journalism Review said the article ‘may be the single worst campaign ’08 piece to appear in any American newspaper so far this election cycle.’”

  • E&P reports, “Will 2008 be a winning campaign year for … newspapers? For the first time since John Kennedy beat Richard Nixon in a presidential race that, by a landslide, anointed television as the medium of choice for political advertising, newspapers are daring to believe they and their Web sites will get more than their usual miniscule share of candidates’ media buys.”

  • Check out The Washington Times’ Andrea Billups and her election blog.

  • Eric Boehlert writes, “Bill Clinton is right”

  • Text & Ideas talks to Politico’s Bill Nichols.

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    TV

  • A NBC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research
    data, ‘NBC Nightly News with Brian Williams’ was the most-watched network evening newscast, winning the week of December 10-16, 2007.”

  • An ABC release announced, “For the week of December 10-14, ABC’s ‘World News with Charles Gibson’ averaged 8.86 million Total Viewers and a 2.1/8 among Adults 25-54, placing second in both categories.”

  • A C-SPAN release announced, “C-SPAN’s LIVE, long-form programming style will allow viewers nationwide a rare opportunity to witness an entire caucus, from start to completion, bringing the nation to Iowa to witness the first election event in the 2008 Presidential race. C-SPAN will be on site at three of the state’s caucuses, with coverage starting at 7:00 PM (ET) Thursday, January 3rd, with the Democratic caucus aired LIVE on C-SPAN, and Republican caucus aired LIVE on C-SPAN2. The network will simulcast Iowa CBS affiliate KCCI-TV in Des Moines as part of its coverage to give national viewers the local angle on caucus events and results. C-SPAN will continue with its extensive coverage of the Presidential primary/caucus schedule on January 4, with events throughout New Hampshire, culminating with the New Hampshire Primary Tuesday, January 8.”

  • An ABC release announced, “Continuing the ‘Nightline’ series The Contenders, co-anchor Cynthia McFadden goes on the trail and behind the scenes with Senator Hillary Clinton (D-NY). ‘Nightline’ will take viewers to Iowa to spend an all-access day in the life with the 2008 Democratic presidential contender. In the exclusive interview, they will cover everything from life on the campaign trail, to her personal and political campaign teams, to her recent endorsement from the Des Moines Register.”

  • Mixed Media reports, “Once Again, CNN Mixes Up Obama and Osama”

  • People Magazine reports, “CNN anchor Campbell Brown and her husband Dan Senor welcomed their first child, a boy, on Tuesday. Eli James Senor was born at exactly 10 a.m. and weighed 8 lbs. He is named in the memory of his grandfather, James Senor. ‘Eli and his mom are doing great,’ Dan Senor tells PEOPLE. ‘We are thrilled.’”

  • Content Bridges has “What Journalists Can Learn From Screenwriters Strike”

  • TVNewser has “5 Questions For… Joe Scarborough“. And, “Joe(y) Scarborough Endorses Ron Paul

  • Bloomberg reports, “Comcast Corp., the biggest U.S. cable-television provider, hired an executive from the Boston Consulting Group to head strategic and financial planning, two weeks after cutting its revenue and subscriber growth forecasts.”

  • The New York Post reports, “The amazing Tina Brown is in a newly struck, first-look deal to bring projects and story ideas to HBO, the TV network that also seems to understand ‘buzz’ and great storytelling versus the hackneyed stuff that is on the networks.”

  • From TVNewser: “Why CNN’s Walton is Having ‘So Much Fun’”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • FishbowlNY reports, “Christopher Hitchens Implies Dead Congressman Was Cult Member”

  • Poynter’s Steve Outing answers, “Why Journalists Suck at Business”

  • Check out Slate’s chief political correspondent John Dickerson’s dispatches from New Hampshire this week.

  • The Los Angeles Times reports, “The Young Turks who made their mark as early backers of Facebook Inc. have raised a second investment round more than four times as large as their first, signaling their growing clout as an alternative to venture capitalists on Silicon Valley’s Sand Hill Road. Founders Fund Management, led by a quartet of wealthy and connected entrepreneurs behind such success stories as online payment service PayPal Inc., said Monday that it had raised $220 million from institutional investors to pump into new companies.”

  • MSNBC’s Steve Adubato writes, “Bill Clinton has come to his wife Hillary’s defense and I’m not convinced that’s a good thing. Clinton blames the media for not covering his wife fairly and he argues that we in the media are not focusing enough on Hillary’s experience, implying that we are holding her to a different and unfair standard.”

  • Don’t forget that tonight is The Washington Blogger December Meetup at 7:00PM at RFD. For more info, click here.

  • Wired reports, “After 10 Years of Blogs, the Future’s Brighter Than Ever”

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    MAGAZINES

  • Folio reports, “Radar magazine is increasing in frequency, from six to eight issues a year, and is raising its rate base from 150,000 to 200,000. The change will take effect in February 2008, one year after its relaunch in February 2007.”

  • Mr. Magazine’s 7 Great Magazine Moments in 07

  • “min’s Exclusive Review of 2007 Magazine Launches

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    RADIO

  • MarketWatch reports, “XM Satellite Radio Inc. said Monday it has settled a copyright infringement lawsuit filed by Universal Music Group over XM’s Inno portable device, which gives users the ability to record music.”

  • NPR’s The Bryant Park Project looks at who some of the Ron Paul supportes are.

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    REVOLVING DOOR

  • This is Amy Mitchell’s last week as Managing Editor at The American Spectator. She is about to “embark on a new adventure,” details to follow.

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    JOBS

  • The Chronicle of Higher Education seeks an experienced reporter to join our teams of journalists who cover public policy and business issues.

  • Greenpeace is looking for a Media Officer.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 06.26.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • What you’ve missed out on during the endless Paris Hilton coverage.

  • An NBC release announced that “The Chris Matthews Show” was “the number-two rated Sunday morning public affairs show topping CBS’s ‘Face the Nation,’ ABC’s ‘This Week’ and ‘FOX News Sunday’ in households nationally for the week ending June 17, 2007.”

  • How dare you call the Extreme-ness “unknown.”

  • Check out mediabistro.com’s DC Courses and Semninars.

  • Slate launched Slate V Monday, their new video magazine.

  • The Politico will co-sponsor another Republican debate at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library, this time with CNN and the Los Angeles Times.

  • The Los Angeles Times reports, “Authors Jeff Gerth and Don Van Natta Jr. have had to labor not only to escape the shadow of Watergate reporting hero Bernstein but also to cope with the particular loathing the Clinton camp has reserved for their biography, ‘Her Way.’”

  • Fox’s Liguori, About to Step Into the Senate’s Line of Fire

  • Internet radio stations to protest royalty hikes

  • Pearlstine’s Plame Book Blames Everyone

  • Ah, the bickering continues:

      Wait, so let me get this straight: The Hill, who were the winners through the agreed-upon seven innings, were the ones who were so upset at the prospect of losing? Wouldn’t it be the team that wanted to extend the game past the ending point — in much the same way grade-school children are wont to do — that would be the one pathetically desperate not to lose?

    And another: “RC vs. Hill = R-E-M-A-T-C-H”

  • Patrick Ruffini on the Politico’s redesign.

  • AOL takes page from blogs, relaunches news

  • Scott Collins: “The Democrats are dead wrong not to debate on Fox News.”

  • Mickey Kaus fact checks Tim Russert.

  • How did you celebrate National Columnists Day?
  • Reuters reports, “The family and colleagues of Alan Johnston, a BBC reporter kidnapped by Islamists in Gaza, urged his captors on Monday not to harm him after he appeared in a video wearing what he said was an explosive belt.”

  • WAMU announced it will turn off its two online music streams today, in recognition of a “Day of Silence” for webcasters across the country. “The online stream of WAMU’s BluegrassCountry.org and WAMU 88.5 Channel 2 on wamu.org — which broadcasts music content from WTMD in Towson, Md. — will go silent for a day.” Visitors to the sites who click on the streaming audio links will instead hear a recorded statement. The station’s on-air broadcast on 88.5 FM, as well as its HD on-air signals, will not be affected. The Internet radio “Day of Silence” is being organized by SaveNetRadio.org, a coalition of artists, labels, listeners, and webcasters. It is meant to represent the silence that could occur when new online music royalty rates set by the Copyright Royalty Board (CRB) take effect July 15.”

  • Regarding Jo Becker a reader writes, “Also, is correct for Post to refer to her as a ‘staff writer’ when she is obviously a staff writer now at Times?”

  • The Los Angeles Times reports, “Broadcast television’s annual springtime sales bazaar drew to a close Friday with the five networks surpassing their estimates by ringing up a combined $9.3 billion in commitments for prime-time commercial spots for the coming TV season.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “Sirius Satellite Radio Inc.’s shares are ‘undervalued’ because the company is unlikely to succeed in combining with larger rival XM Satellite Radio Holdings Inc. and offers a better product, Merrill Lynch & Co. said.”

  • Deborah Howell addresses the updates FOIA so badly needs, “Reporters use FOIA a lot less than businesses do, probably one reason the U.S. Chamber of Commerce supports reform, along with about 100 other organizations.”

  • Parents Television Council President Tim Winter will testify before the Senate Commerce Committee on issue of television violence at the “Impact of Media Violence on Children” hearing at 10 a.m. today.

  • Anita Kumar from the St. Petersburg Times is joining the Washington Post as a new statehouse correspondent in Richmond.

  • The Deal reports, “The proposed $17.52 billion Thomson-Reuters merger is expected to result in an asset sale in order to win regulatory approval.”

  • Ronald Aronica and Mtetwa Ramdoo, business analysts, weigh in on Tom Friedman’s book with a critical analysis.

  • New York Business.com reports, “Publisher David Carey was pressing the flesh last week during the final stretch of his race to fill Conde Nast Portfolio’s second issue with ads. He met with clients to share enthusiastic e-mails from some of the business title’s high-profile readers, media buyers say. His efforts to retain all his advertisers haven’t been entirely successful.”

  • PBS Tells Producer Not To Hire Conservatives.”

  • Roger Aronoff thinks, “This has been a rough year for Tim Russert, though you wouldn’t know it the way he is treated by the media.”

  • RenewAmerica responds to WashingtonTimes

  • The New York Times reports, “This week, Mr. Binn will announce that his magazine company, Niche Media, will merge with Greenspun Media Group of Las Vegas — which publishes Vegas, Wynn and Venetian Style, among other magazines — and Ocean Drive Media Group, which publishes Ocean Drive and Ocean Drive Español and several other magazines.”

  • Emily Lenzner is leaving NPR to fill in for ABC’s This Week Editorial Producer Ilana Drimmer, who will be on maternity leave through the end of the year.

  • MinOnline reports, “‘Gossip’ Remains Advertising Stronger Than ‘Real’ News And Business.”

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext