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Posts Tagged ‘Tory Newmyer’

Happy 15th Birthday MSNBC!

MSNBC President Phil Griffin and wife, Kory Apton

Former Democratic PA Gov. Ed Rendell and NBC’s Andrea Mitchell

MSNBC’s top brass pulled out the metaphorical pom poms Thursday night for the network’s 15th birthday party in downtown Washington. MSNBC President Phil Griffin dramatically climbed stairs, looked out at the crowd and profoundly praised some of the network’s top stars such as Andrea Mitchell, Chris Matthews, Ed Schultz and Chuck Todd.

On Schultz: “Honesty he’s got more heart than anyone on TV.”  On Todd: “Honestly the best political show in the morning after the 9 o’clock hour,” Griffin told a chuckling audience, making a clear reference to the popular “Morning Joe.” On Matthews: “He’s the heart and soul of MSNBC.” He praised Mitchell for being to go all over the world and back just to meet a deadline.

Matthews arrived at 7:45 p.m., an hour and a half after the party began, and left within 25 minutes. While awaiting his turn to speak, he folded his arms tightly to his chest and had a sourpuss look planted on his face — this is typical Matthews. Grumpy. Impatient. Glancing skeptically around the room.  He did manage dry humor. “Thank you for letting me speak freely, mostly,” he said pointedly, eying Griffin. Matthews then gave a shout-out to former Democratic Gov. Ed Rendell, a star in this D.C.-centric crowd. “He’s skinnier than he should be,” Matthews said. “I liked it better when he was fat.” At the end of his speech, his speech turned into a one-man pep rally with each passing word getting louder and LOUDER to the point where people turned to look at one another.

During Griffin’s speech, one chatty D.C. writer got the evil eye as he told the vast crowd to quiet down. “It’s like I am in high school. I was always getting yelled at for talking during the program,” the writer whispered to FishbowlDC.

Moving on to more unusual party topics: the Casey Anthony trial and CNN’s dumping of Eliot Spitzer. FishbowlDC polled a wide swath of journos at the party. We asked, “What did you think of the Casey Anthony verdict?” Most were happy to respond, even if their answer was that they purposefully stayed as far away from story as possible.

“That and synchronized swimming,” said MSNBC Contributor Richard Wolffe, naming topics besides the Casey Anthony trial that he doesn’t readily discuss. “Justice is blind and so am I.” Onto the topic of Spitzer, Wolffe remarked, “Inevitable. That was so predictable. Smart guy, but the show never took off. I don’t think you can find redemption  by anchoring a cable TV show. Redemption requires good deeds, community service and charitable work.”

Strangely, Schultz went mute on the topic of the trial and would not say a single word about that or anything. His amiable wife, Wendy, tried to coax him out of his shell. “This is a fun little event,” she said eating chips and guacamole. “Come on Eddie.” No budging. No speaking. Wendy kindly responded to our questions. She said neither she nor Ed followed the trial in any in-depth way.

The couple, who have been married for 13 years,  lives part-time in Detroit Lakes, Minn. and the rest in Manhattan. Wendy prefers Minnesota. She says she offers her husband feedback, but always makes sure it’s supportive. “I give him honest feedback,” she said. “A lot of it is pillow talk. I’ve always encouraged him.”

Read about the journo who got scolded by Griffin and see more photographs…

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Mediabistro Course

Social Media 201

Social Media 201Starting October 13Social Media 201 picks up where Social Media 101 leaves off, to provide you with hands-on instruction for gaining likes, followers, retweets, favorites, pins, and engagement. Social media experts will teach you how to make social media marketing work for your bottom line and achieving your business goals. Register now!

Good Morning FishbowlDC Readers

QUOTES of the DAY


TV reporter frets about his hair

“Finally wake up and don’t look like ‘Greg Brady.’ Now I find out I can catch cancer from the product which has given me straight hair!” — ABC7 Reporter Stephen Tschida in a Monday tweet. Pssst Stephen…try the Keratin treatment, the one without formaldehyde.

King critique

“King even interrupting the 10 second answers.” — National Review Editor Rich Lowry in a Monday night tweet during the CNN televised GOP debate in New Hampshire. CNN’s John King moderated.

“Seriously: How did Gingrich escape any scrutiny of his campaign difficulties? I mean, really??” — The Hill‘s Michael O’Brien in a Monday night tweet about the GOP debate.

If Treach’s son was gay…

“If I found out my son was gay, I’d tell him: 1) I love him no matter what, and 2) I could really use his help picking a living room set.” The Daily Caller’s Jim Treacher in a Monday tweet.

Weiner Analysis

“Real reason Weiner’s getting shivved: Congress is like prison and he’s a man without a gang.” — Fortune Magazine’s Tory Newmyer in a Monday tweet.

The Pizza Man makes a big choice

“Deep Dish.” — GOP Presidential hopeful Herman Cain in Monday night’s GOP debate when CNN’ s John King asked if he prefers deep dish or thin crust pizza.

Missing Broder

“The first real debate of 2012. It doesn’t seem right without David Broder here. #wapo” — WaPo‘s Karen Tumulty in a Monday tweet.

Deep thoughts on Journalism…

“Journalism isn’t about what you ‘think’ or ‘believe.’ Skepticism and curiosity are hammer and nails. Takes skill to build something.” — Mediaite‘s White House reporter Tommy Christopher in a weekend  tweet.

Everyone’s a fashion critic

“CNN”s Wolf Blitzer and John King are wearing matching purple ties. Purple, insiders note, is made by mixing red & blue. #bipartisanship.” — Vanity Fair in a Monday tweet.

“Um, weird moment just now on CNN: @JohnKingUSA and @WolfBlitzerCNN wearing identical suit/tie combos. Uniforms tonight, perhaps? #cnndebate” — Mediaite TV Editor Mark Joyella in a Monday tweet.

 

CQ Press First Street Unveils With a Spritz of Glitterati

From L To R: Steven Weber, Andrea Bowen, Rachel Leigh Cook, Wilder Valderrama, Robin Bronk, CQ Press First Street’s President John Jenkins and Gloria Reuben

The White Van

Valderrama was ready for his closeup.

Last night journalists were confronted with a couple of things at CQ Press’ First Street launch party at Art and Soul. First off: The stars were late. This left a dense pack of photographers, reporters and event handlers full of anticipation on the edges of a shrunken red carpet for a good while. Secondly: When the Creative Coalition showed up to the restaurant in a nondescript white van about an hour after they were due to arrive, eager fans rushed the van in a quest for autographs. This jangled the already frayed nerves of handlers who snapped and rolled their eyes at the autograph seekers and caused the red carpet procession to be more of a scrambling chaotic frenzy than it already is.

“Each one is worse than the next,” remarked Steven Weber, an actor dispatched by the Creative Coalition to red carpet events like these. He was talking about the red carpet portion of the evening only. Some might know him from NBC’s “Wings” or ABC’s “Brothers & Sisters.” Regardless, he looks familiar and people were chattering about how nice he is.

Valderrama was seen talking quietly and patiently with journalists in attendance. Despite the harried handlers, he methodically signed a slew of autographs on his way inside.

The purpose of the evening was to launch CQ Press First Street, which is owned by Sage, a worldwide publishing house, not The Economist Group. First Street aims to be a one-stop shop for journalists, lawyers and Joe Q. Public to navigate Washington’s lobbying industry. They’ve 30 employees with more hires on the way. So far AP has signed on, but Jenkins is staying silent on who else is. He doesn’t want the competition getting wind of internal info. The cost is $3,750 per year with discounts and scholarships to those who need them. “It’ll open up the transparency and help us better understand what lobbyists are doing,” Jenkins told FishbowlDC, mentioning those scholarships. “We understand journalists would love to have this and money is tight.”

Jenkins says the best part of First Street is that journalists will be able to do in a “millisecond” what would ordinarily take a week of research.

Weber, meanwhile, used his star power to praise CQ Press’ First Street, saying it’s going to be “invaluable.” He said, “It’s going to be a great way to find out who’s paying who off. It’ll be a good tool, a good way to ensure there’s disclosure.”

Once everyone barreled inside, the rest of the evening went off smoothly with speeches, booze flowing, big fried cheese balls and delicious miniature cupcakes with bright Pepto pink frosting for dessert. Journos mixed and mingled and dissected who all the stars were and in what movies or TV shows they’ve appeared. There was also chatter about Rep. Aaron Schock‘s (R-Ill.) shocking abfest on the cover of Men’s Health.

Find out who was there and see more photographs after the jump…

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The First Toast

From L to R: Budding Fashion Reporters Jocelyn Luddy and Reilly Folsom.

WHCA President David Jackson (USA Today) and NYT’s Mark Leibovich

What’s a party with Washington’s media elite without bourbon, beer, wine, Food Truck quality mac ‘n cheese and 11-year-old fashionistas to put guests in the hot seat?

The view from the American Gas Association offered guests a perfect shot of the Capitol. The crowd at last night’s WHCD party thrown by QGA and FD blended White House correspondents like CNN’s Ed Henry, Ebony‘s Kevin Chappell, The Hill‘s Sam Youngman and USA Today‘s David Jackson , USA Radio Network’s Connie Lawn, and Politico’s Julie Mason with Fortune‘s Tory Newmyer, Politico‘s Amie Parnes, RealClearPoliticsErin McPike, Roll Call‘s John Stanton and NYT‘s Carl Hulse. Let’s just get one thing straight: NYT‘s Mark Leibovich has heard all the “bcc” jokes out there. And yours will not be special. Welcome to the first party leading into WHCD weekend.

The food was catered by D.C. food trucks of lore CapMac and Sauca and guests were dying over the mac ‘n cheese. Dessert was Good Humor ice cream bars from a cart complete with an umbrella. One partygoer remarked that the party could have been held on an outside corner. But a party outside wouldn’t have allowed for the two-station open bar, where bartenders made unsolicited repeat drinks for many of the journos. One guest called one of the bartenders “the motherf*cking man.”

Other guests in the crowd: QGA’s Jack Quinn and wife, Susanna, FD’s Jackson Dunn, Stacey Bowlin, Jared Allen and Mary Kathryn Cover, Terry McAuliffe, QGA and FBDC’s Matt DornicWaPo‘s Amy Argetsinger, SELF’s Marc Adelman, Pamela Sorensen of Pamela’s Punch, The Hill‘s Christina Wilkie and Emily Goodin, CNN Publicist Edie Emery and Megan Grant and TWT’s Emily Miller.

Miller said WHCD week makes her feel like an awkward teenager. “It brings out the worst 16-year-old in me,” Miller said, explaining that her worries go like this: ‘”Why wasn’t I invited to that party?’ or ‘Was I too fat for this dress?’” She adds, “At least I was invited to the pre-pre-pre-pre-pre party.”

The fashionistas at the party were Jocelyn Luddy (daughter to Jack and Susanna) and her friend, Reilly Folsom, who were testing out their journalistic skills by interviewing female party guests and Adelman. They’re trying out for a fashion blog out of San Fran called StyleBistro.com. They asked their subjects questions about what uniform they’d want for work if they had to have one and what styles they missed and didn’t.

The girls in flowered skirts and white T-shirts weren’t amateurs. They had practiced their questions for days. They cajoled by saying funny things like, “Come on, I want all the deets.” As the pair interviewed USA Today‘s Jackie Kucinich, the whole scene became so focused that photographers like Roll Call‘s Tom Williams began snapping pictures of the interview. Afterwards, Kucinich and Argetsinger (also interviewed by the girls) second-guessed their answers that involved Pappagallo purses and culottes.

Alec Jacob contributed to this report.

More pictures and guests after the jump…

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Roll Call Seeks to Rebuild Image

When a publication loses some 15 people, including a beloved editor, a deputy editor and the head of ad sales in a seven-month time span, it ceases to be right or accurate to say that it  is undergoing a transition. Or, to reason that this is the topsy turvy, fluctuating world of  journalism these days.

At the time of then-Editor Charlie Mitchell‘s sudden departure last fall, Editorial Director Mike Mills said they had “concluded together” that this was the best way to proceed. Former Roll Call reporter Tory Newmyer, now at Fortune Magazine, voiced  online what so many Roll Call reporters felt then and now: “Terrible move, CQ overlords. Mitchell = 1st rate editor, world class human.”

But like many editors who must go back to ground level and find steady footing, it’s an “exciting” time. Roll Call‘s Editor Scott Montgomery is no exception: “People are still excited. I am excited. We still have some challenges to get through before we fill these jobs. But it’s kind of cool to think about remaking things and taking Roll Call forward.”

As management dusts itself off after an intense exodus of resignations and otherwise forced departures, top brass find themselves in an introspective process of rebuilding and figuring out just where to move from here. Long known as the stalwart figure amongst Washington’s Hill publications, Roll Call rests on that historical description and maybe a little too much. In a phone interview with Montgomery on Tuesday morning, FishbowlDC learned vaguely about where this relatively new editor wants to take the newspaper in the coming months. But specifics? He hesitated for fear of the competition getting too much information. Among the things we do know: Roll Call is one week out of its so-called one-month hiring freeze implemented company-wide by The Economist Group. Montgomery announced that they are looking to add at least three senior editors and five new reporters to its editorial team, which is roughly half of what they’ve lost.

As of late, management has made some unusual hiring moves, or rehiring as the case may be. For one thing, they brought back Shira Toeplitz, who spent a year at Politico before realizing that maybe the grass isn’t always greener type of thing. And today, they’re playing up yet another return: a former intern who has spent the past few years working on the desk of the NYT.

“What we need, it’s not magic,” Montgomery said in our talk. “Roll Call has a great reputation, a great history. It still is the newspaper of Capitol Hill and is still seen that way. We need to continue to do that. We know who our audience is. We know who we are. So my goal is fairly straightforward — to do what Roll Call is known for. We cover the Hill. We cover members. We cover leadership. We cover those staffs. The professional community of Capitol Hill. That’s who are readers are, that’s who we’re there for, and we like that.”

And yet, the chatter in media and staff circles is that HOH, the famed gossip column, isn’t what it was even weeks and months ago when Emily Heil still ran it and when Elizabeth Brotherton was still on board. And Around the Hill has gone a little, well, over the Hill and around the bend. What does Montgomery say to critics and doubters? “I can’t answer that directly because I’ve only been here a few months myself,” he said. “There’s no doubt the environment is very different from what it was. Roll Call can’t be what it was five or ten years ago and expect to prosper. It’s not about whether people think we’ve lost a step, but it’s about the steps we take forward. We need to be a must-read for people. We need to make sure that they are rewarded every time they do.”

On the subject of HOH, Montgomery concedes that there must be a shift toward Capitol Hill and away from the party scene. The parties won’t be abandoned, mind you, but he thinks the column needs some “reporting heft.” He explained,  “I want to bring on a smart person who is sourced on Capitol Hill and can bring a level of newsiness, a saucy newsiness.” Around the Hill is here to stay, he insisted, saying that it is something for which the publication is known. “It’s a big part of what distinguishes us from our competitors, and that needs to continue,” he said.

More on Montgomery’s intentions…

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Roll Callers React to Editor Resigning

For much of the day we’re going to keep this space open to Roll Call employees who wish to react publicly (with or without their names attached) to the news today of Editor Charle Mitchell’s resignation. If you wish to contribute, write to us at FishbowlDC@mediabistro.com or send to me at FishbowlBetsy@gmail.com.

1.  “Personally I’m pretty surprised and saddened. I like Charlie a lot and he’s done a yeoman’s job of keeping things together during an exceptionally hectic year. Will be interested to see what my colleagues think though. I’m sure there are others who see things differently. Definitely did not see this coming. ”

2.  “Terrible move, CQ overlords. Mitchell = 1st rate editor, world class human.” — former Roll Call reporter Tory NewMyer in a Tweet today. NewMyer is now at Fortune Magazine.

3. From a CQ-Roll Call employee: “Quite a blow for us and definitely didn’t see this coming. Would love to know where he’s going.”

4. From Anonymous: “Charlie Mitchell is a great guy and hard worker but no one is saying the CQ-Roll Call is a great place to work so I am not surprised by his departure. Curious to see if he ends up at Bloomberg with everyone else.”

5. From WaPo’s Paul Kane, who worked at Roll Call between 2000 and 2006: “Charlie’s first day at 50 F St was my second to last day, as his hiring announcement and my departure announcement came at roughly the same time, Christmas-ish 2006
‘PK, I always wanted to work with you, this is going to be great … Charlie, this is gonna be the best two or three damn days ever.’ In nearly 7 years there, my only Roll Call regret was not getting to work with Charlie more. “

Newmyer to Fortune

Fortune Managing Editor Andy Serwer announced yesterday that Tory Newmyer has joined the magazine as a writer. Memo from Sewer announcing the hire below:

Finally, please welcome Tory Newmyer to FORTUNE as a Writer. Tory joins us from Roll Call, where he worked as a staff writer covering the House of Representatives, consistently scooping the competition. Before tackling Congress he was part of a team of reporters covering lobbying. Tory will be based in D.C., covering the intersection of business and policy.

Please join me in congratulating our colleagues, old and new.

-AES

Andy Serwer
Managing Editor
FORTUNE Magazine

Washington Journos Toast Kitty Kelley

kk ein kk.jpg

Famed investigative biographer, Kitty Kelley, celebrated her book release at a party on Friday evening at the home of Daniel and Marina Ein. The book, Oprah: A Biography, was released on April 13th by Crown Publishers.

The event was well-attended by DC media types, business power-players and the political elite. Kelley made her rounds and spoke with guests prior to giving a thank you and toast in which she described Oprah as “the most powerful, influential person on the planet.” Kelley expressed admiration and only kind remarks about her “determined subject.” She continued by saying Oprah is “revered and idolized” throughout the world and ended with “long may she reign.”

However, this same level of admiration for Oprah was not as evident from party goers. Guests at the event traded examples of Oprah’s alleged spins, lies, and her legal and illegal indulgences discovered via Kelley’s book. A common topic among press types was the media’s blackballing of Kelley and her book because of Oprah’s intimidation factor. One guest was overheard asking a group “why hasn’t anyone in the media covered Oprah’s control of the message?” The consensus was that Oprah was likely “puppeteering” an underground PR initiative.

Spotted by FishbowlDC were The Daily Caller’s Moira Bagley, Politico’s Kiki Ryan, Newsweek’s Michael Isikoff and wife, WaPo’s Mary Anne Akers, Washington Life’s Kevin Chaffee and Donna Shor, NY Times’ Helene Cooper, Georgetown Dish’s Beth Solomon, Roll Call’s Tory Newmyer, The Daily Beast’s Lee Aitken and Mark Paustenbauch.

This post was contributed by Glenn Ballard for FishbowlDC.

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The Buzz at Smerconish Book Party

An iconic group from Capitol Hill, K Street, NIH and the media gathered at the home of Marina and Daniel Ein‘s home on Thursday to celebrate the publication of Michael Smerconish‘s new book, Morning Drive: Things I Wish I Knew Before I Started Talking.

Folks chattered about Pennsylvania politics (Senator Arlen Specter‘s chances for re-election post-party swap…deemed “excellent” by most) and swine flu. MSNBC Hardball host Chris Matthews extracted an “I’m not running for the Senate” from popular Democratic Pennsylvania Congressman Patrick Murphy while former Senator Ted Stevens talked up WaPo’s MaryAnn Akers.

Roll Call reporters Tory Newmyer, Emily Heil and long-time Chicago Sun Times bureau chief Lynn Sweet made the fete and celebrity biographer Kitty Kelley mixed it up with Politics Mag’s Boyce Upholt.

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Chris Matthews and Rep. Patrick Murphy (D-PA)

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Chicago Sun Times Washington Bureau Chief Lynn Sweet and Biographer Kitty Kelley

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Chris Matthews and Michael Smerconish

* All photos courtesy of nobilephoto.com

Rising Star Finalists

mblogo.jpgAfter the jump, you’ll find the finalists for FishbowlDC’s Rising Star competition. Congrats to everyone for being nominated and making it into the 2nd round in our first “Rising Star” competition. The winners will accompany mediabistro.com and FishbowlDC to the National Press Foundation Dinner, with a seat next to a high-profile guest (and if you’re a high profile guest who wants to go, let us know).

Plus: We’ll be giving away seats to lucky winners we’ll pick at random. Click here to enter the raffle (send your name, affiliation and contact info).

Now, before you write in to complain about so-and-so not getting included, etc., etc., let’s explain a few things.

1.) If you didn’t get nominated, you didn’t get considered. The pool of contenders was chosen by you.
2.) Some (actually, many) people were not included because, in our opinion, they were already “risen”, not “rising” (For instance: Ed Henry was nominated. Funnily enough, so was Helen Thomas). So, for some of you, it’s a compliment.
3.) We did our best to limit the number of finalists from each publication, from certain beats, and from each medium (print, radio, broadcast, etc.).
4.) Most importantly, we’re well aware that the list is imperfect. We did our best. Our apologies in advance if you felt snubbed. Dorian, Inky and Patrick discussed the finalists but the finalists were mostly determined by consulting with employees at various news organizations for their insight, thoughts and advice.

Okay, so this is how it’s going work: After the jump is the list of finalists. If you’re already attending the National Press Foundation Annual Awards Dinner on February 22, let us know. Unfortunately, we’ll have to remove your name from consideration, since that means you won’t be able to sit with us (*tear*). Also, if you simply don’t want to be considered, please also let us know. Then, with the list tweaked as/if needed, we will open up voting Thursday morning and it will go through Monday.

Click below for the finalists…

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