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Posts Tagged ‘Tracey Neale’

Morning Reading List, 12.18.07

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Good morning Washington. Don Rumsfeld resigned a year ago today and Brad Pitt, Keith Richards and Christina Aguilera all turn a year older today. (Hat tip: MicCheckRadio)

Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | RADIO | WEST WING REPORTAGE | REVOLVING DOOR | JOBS

  • You think it is harder to write well as opposed to report well.

    NEWSPAPERS

  • Legal Times announces the Lobbying Campaigns of the Year. Check out who made the cut.

  • Variety reports, “In the Wall Street Journal newsroom on Dec. 13, the day the paper officially became News Corp. property, Rupert Murdoch and new publisher Robert Thomson addressed hundreds of reporters who came loaded with plenty of questions. Murdoch understatedly acknowledged the ‘nervousness’ caused by his purchase of the privately run Dow Jones, and Thomson, rather enigmatically, cautioned, ‘While it’s right to be respectful of the past, these days it is certainly fatal to be haunted by history. He who stands still will be overrun.’”

  • The Chicago Tribune reports, “Sun-Times Media Group Inc., hit hard by worsening newspaper industry conditions, said Friday that directors approved a plan that will reduce operating costs by $50 million in 2008 and involve layoffs.”

  • The Denver Post reports, “On the docket at the FCC this week is a rule that would allow newspapers and TV stations to buy each other, at least in larger markets. The rule would apply to the country’s top 20 markets (including Denver, No. 18). A proviso would prevent newspapers from buying any of the top four TV or radio stations, based on audience size. The FCC has been attempting to lift the restrictions on media consolidation for years and now is in a hurry to get it done Tuesday.”

  • Roll Call has more on Birdgate.

  • The Chicago Tribune reports, “The stiffest penalty for the crimes Conrad Black and his henchmen committed while running the company now known as Sun-Times Media Group came down Friday, four days after Black received 6 1/2 years in federal prison and before Monday’s sentencing of his turncoat lieutenant, former Sun-Times Publisher F. David Radler. This punishment hit the very people trying to make a go of Black’s old scandal- scarred enterprise, seeking to overcome his crippling legacy at a time when even media companies not haunted by past criminal leadership are struggling.”

  • The New York Times reports,Bilal Hussein, an Iraqi photographer who had a hand in The Associated Press’s 2005 Pulitzer Prize for photography before being jailed without charges by the United States military, finally had a day in court last week. But his story, which highlights the unprecedented role that Iraqis are playing in news coverage of the war, is really just beginning.”

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    TV

  • For all of you journos heading to HDTV, maybe this should make your Christmas list. They now offer gift certificates! We kid because we love.

  • MarketWatch reports, “In the entertainment industry’s ongoing strike, getting writers back to work will require the two sides to make peace in cyberspace.”

  • A CNN release announced, “CNN will marshal its extensive resources and political expertise for wall-to-wall coverage of the Iowa caucuses on Jan. 3, 2008. Lead political anchor Wolf Blitzer, along with Anderson Cooper and Lou Dobbs, will lead the network’s special coverage of the Iowa caucuses out of the new CNN Election Center in New York. Special programming will begin at 4 p.m. (ET) and run late into the night.”

  • Howard Kurtz writes, “Political reporters, as a rule, are an industrious band of road warriors who work hard to get people to speak on the record. But under deadline pressure, they sometimes succumb to the lure of the juicy quote dished out by operatives trying to damage rival candidates. Perhaps it’s time to rethink the practice.”

  • Also from Kurtz, “A handful of Mormon journalists have risen to national prominence, from the late muckraking columnist Jack Anderson to former CBS “Early Show” co-host Jane Clayson. And they make up a majority of the staff at Salt Lake City’s Deseret Morning News, which is owned by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.”

  • DCRTV reports, “DCRTV hears from a 9er: ‘Tracey Neale (left) out, Leslie Foster (right) in.’ From another 9er: ‘Tracey Neale ‘relinquishes’ 6 PM and 11 PM anchor job at 9 to devote more time to adopted children. Leslie Foster gets 6 PM and 11 PM anchor slot.’ And another 9er: ‘Tracey Neale gone from 6 PM and 11 PM, Leslie Foster now anchors both shows and is consumer reporter. (New anchor) Anita Brikman is new health reporter.”

  • TVNewser reported yesterday, “Today comes word of the 2008 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award winners in broadcast journalism, with NBC News and CBS News garnering honors.”

  • And, also from DCRTV, “DCRTV hears that Channel 7/WJLA news anchor Alison Starling is in the midst of negotiations for a new contract with the Allbritton ABC affiliate. The word is that she’s asking for more money. Duh”

  • B&C reports, “CNN/U.S. president Jon Klein signed a new four-year deal to remain at the helm of the TV-news operation, according to sources familiar with the situation. Klein will continue to report to Jim Walton, president of CNN/Worldwide.”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • His Extremeness announced, “a huge milestone was reached today for Extreme Mortman — we passed over a unique million visitors for the year.”

  • The Hollywood Reporter reports, “The title of most-visited online news site continues to be a hotly contested, with CNN, Yahoo News and MSNBC all vying for the throne. Last month, the CNN Digital Network had the largest unique audience in its 11-year history, according to Nielsen Online. The Time Warner-owned news source received nearly 33 million unique visitors, beating out Yahoo News and the MSNBC Digital Network, which had about 31 million and 30 million visitors, respectively.”

  • Poynter Online reports, “As painful as corrections are to journalists, the screw-ups they reflect do damage on a far greater scale to the news organizations they work for.”

  • The AP reports, “Online advertising jumped 25 percent this year, raking in a cool $20 billion, but Internet executives say that figure could have been even higher if advertisers had reliable and consistent ways to measure online audiences.”

  • Boston Globe reports, “The stated mission of Google Inc. is to ‘organize the world’s information and make it universally accessible and useful.’ But media moguls from around the world converged on Harvard Business School recently to learn more about Google’s unstated mission which, as Harvard professor Thomas R. Eisenmann put it, is to ‘sell targeted advertising in every medium everywhere.’”

  • Portfolio tries to calculate, “What’s Drudge Worth?”

  • Newsmax.com reports, “The mainstream media have consistently treated Hillary Clinton with kid gloves, ignoring Clinton scandals and refusing to ask tough questions even as she seeks the presidency, charges Brent Bozell, president of the Media Research Council.”

  • NewsFactor.com reports, “The common consensus in the media is that Google’s new ‘knol’ tool will be aimed squarely at Wikipedia, and in fact the sample Web page on display in Udi Manber’s blog post does bear some passing resemblance to a typical Wikipedia page. But other features suggest Google’s target is less Wikipedia than it is About.com.”

  • Wonkette reports, “Trusted Internet political bastion Right Wing News held its 6th annual Conservative Blog awards, and your Wonkette is a winner! Well, at least we placed. In the ‘Most Overrated Blog’ category, Wonkette tied with frienemy Redstate and something called Power Line for fourth place. Fourth place, of course, is the new first place, so huzzah for our internets!” Check out the full details of the contest here.

  • Gateway Pundit reports, “Its a Quagmire!… Media Reports 6 Bogus Stories in 6 Weeks!”

  • Huffington Post’s Jason Linkins reports, “David Gregory Does Battle With Talking-Point Dispensing Robot” (a.k.a Sen. Clinton).

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    RADIO

  • A CNN Radio release announced, “As 2007 comes to a close, CNN anchor Wolf Blitzer and CNN Radio are offering affiliates a special year-end review of the past 12 months – one minute at a time – and then in a two-hour special called ’2007 Rewind.’ Hosted by Blitzer, the two-hour ’2007 Rewind’ takes a look at some of the biggest stories of 2007 while moving some of the stories forward into the New Year. CNN journalists including Lisa Desjardins, A.J. Hammer, Ed Henry, Amanda Moyer, Miles O’Brien, Kyra Phillips, Jim Ribble, Larry Smith, Gary Tuchman and others will contribute to the program. The one-minute features, also anchored by Blitzer, examine the biggest stories of 2007 including such topics as the Virginia Tech shootings, the Minnesota bridge collapse, the resignation of U.S. Attorney General Alberto Gonzales, Barry Bonds, Michael Vick, Don Imus, Britney Spears, the California fires, drought, immigration and more.”

    WEST WING REPORTAGE

  • Crain’s New York reports, “The auction for Karl Rove’s memoir drags on a month after the Republican strategist made the rounds of publishers with Washington power lawyer Robert Barnett at his side.”

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    REVOLVING DOOR

  • Matthew Felling fell victim to the cuts at CBSNews.com saying in an email, “It’s with mixed feelings that I share the information that — effective as of mid-afternoon last Friday — I have been let go at CBSNews.com in a ‘restructuring’ of the Interactive division.” TVNewser weighs in here.

  • Huffington Post’s Eat The Press has this to say on the Eye situation: “Today the Public Eye blog has a post by Brian Montopoli, current CBS political reporter and previous Public Eye co-editor with Felling, who, according to CBS interactive spokesperson Dana McClintock, will be ‘taking his spot.’ Though McClintock specifically denied that Public Eye was being eliminated, in an accelerating political season it seems unlikely that Montopoli would revert back to media criticism after deliberately switching beats — just as it seems unlikely that CBS would be hiring a replacement for Felling.”

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    JOBS

  • Congressional Quarterly is looking for a Social Policy Reporter and an Economics and Finance Editor.

  • The New Republic is looking for reporter-researchers.

  • Independent Agent Magazine is seeking a Managing Editor.

  • The News Leader is looking for a Sports Reporter.

  • Media Matters for America is looking for a Deputy Editorial Director.

  • The McGraw-Hill Companies is looking for a Sales Coordinator, BusinessWeek (DC Bureau).

  • National Public Radio is looking for a Supervising Senior Editor, All Things Considered.

  • Legal Times is seeking an Editorial Assistant.

  • NomadsLand is looking for a Video Producer.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

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    Morning Reading List, 10.02.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • It is almost unanimous. You think Les Kinsolving is “A total pain who’s become a joke”

  • Yuille Moves to CBS News

  • An NBC release announced, “NBC’s ‘Meet the Press with Tim Russert’ reached a ratings milestone as the nation’s No. 1 Sunday morning public affairs program, winning its 10th consecutive season among total viewers and its 14th straight season among the key demographic adults 25-54.”

  • ABC’s “World News” webcast launched a new page on ABCNEWS.com yesterday.

  • Washington Post reports, “New mom Tracey Neale thought she understood how adopting twins would change her life. She had no clue.”

  • Ken Walsh helps pass the torch from Tony Snow to Dana Perino.

  • A reader weighs in on The New York Times magazine on D.C., calling it “horribly juvenile, amateurish, unprofessional, offensive, way off-base, and so full dumb generalizations, stereotypes and over-simplifications that it was worse than some high school newspaper articles that I’ve read. For about the millionth time: D.C. is NOT New York and New York is not New Orleans and New Orleans is not Austin and…etc., etc. No one can compare cities, and no one can say what is ‘energy’ or what is not, and no one can just bolt into a town and make generalizations that are not true. And, what, for some period of time there were no clubs in D.C. with ‘energy,’ and, poof, all of a sudden there are? Huh? What? What a stupid, dumb article to appear in The New York Times.”

  • A reader weighs on in Kucinich, “Dana Milbank gets the same treatment from the Kucinich camp. this is at the end of his column last week about the event at the press club on aliens: ‘So far, however, the presidential candidates remain, well, alienated.’ Even Kucinich. ‘If you have a serious question, just ask me,; Kucinich spokeswoman Natalie Laber replied when told of the UFO crowd’s hopes for her boss. ‘If not, then just keep your silly comments to yourself.’ (Milbank skewered Kucinich earlier this year over a press event he had to impeach Cheney, I believe).

  • The International Reporting Project (IRP) announced “12 senior editors and producers from across the United States to participate in an intensive 11-day visit to Korea this November as part of the IRP’s annual ‘Gatekeeper Editors’ fellowships. For the full list, click here. IRP also announced the three U.S. journalists awarded International Reporting Project (IRP) Fellowships for the fall 2007 program.

  • FishbowlNY has launched the 360 Daily Angle: “a video update of the morning’s news stories.” It’s produced and anchored by NYCTV’s Amy Palmer.

  • MarketWatch reports, “News Corp. Chairman and CEO Rupert Murdoch joined heads of state from Turkey, Croatia and Timor-L’Este in condemning violence in Myanmar and called on economic prosperity as a cure for the global turmoil.”

  • Los Angeles Times reports, “Since the public blow-up in July between Sumner Redstone and his daughter Shari over corporate governance and succession issues at their family-controlled entertainment empire, the 84-year-old chairman of Viacom Inc. and CBS Corp. has been on a campaign to convince the world that the feud has blown over.”

  • Dallas Morning News reports, “Belo Corp., owner of The Dallas Morning News and WFAA-TV, announced this morning that it intends to spin off its newspapers and publishing operations into a separate, publicly traded company.”

  • The Guardian reports, “The FT has announced a radical overhaul of the fees users must pay to access its website”

  • WWD.com reports, “Across the category, men’s titles are adapting to a field swept clean of most laddie magazines and men’s shopping titles, where luxury is king, and where reaching the older man is now a desirable proposition. GQ, which is celebrating its 50th anniversary, and Esquire, which will celebrate its 75th next year, used to be cast as stodgy by the British lad invasion, and both resorted to copying their formula of gross-out humor and barely clothed starlets.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “Time Warner Inc.’s AOL is poised to capture a bigger share of Internet marketing budgets as its advertising.com unit more than doubles sales to $1.3 billion in four years, a Bear Stearns Cos. analyst said.”

  • MarketWatch’s Jon Friedman writes, “If the speculation is true about you and GQ magazine, you are playing a dangerous game with the media. This time, you apparently crossed the line.”

  • AP reports, “Barnes & Noble.com is getting a new look. Starting Monday, the online site for the superstore chain will have a thoroughly revised home page, including a running scroll of featured releases, and a number of new offerings, including Barnes & Noble Review, a magazine that will be updated daily with reviews and interviews.”

  • The Charlotte Observer reports, “In an address that made the musings of Nostradamus seem rosy by comparison, a respected industry observer warned radio executives Wednesday that their industry would all but evaporate within 20 years.”

  • Washington Post reports, “The industry has tried to get the word out, but many consumers still aren’t getting the message: In a year and a half, millions of television screens could go dark. Not the fancy high-definition TVs or those connected to cable or satellite. But the 70 million sets relying on rooftop or ‘rabbit ears’ antennas will end up showing nothing but snow.”

  • PBS Ombudsman writes, “This was a big week for PBS. On Monday night, the Public Broadcasting Service won 10 ‘Emmy’ Awards in the News and Documentary category, more than any broadcast or cable television network. And the night before, the highly-touted and much-publicized series ‘The War’ by famed documentary filmmaker Ken Burns made its debut on hundreds of PBS-affiliated stations across the country. But did PBS try to make what, by any measure, was a big — and justifiably good — week appear even bigger? The officials here say no, but it looks to me as though they did.”

  • “WHYY’s Bill Marrazzo is America’s best-paid public broadcasting exec. So why does his station give Philadelphians news from Delaware, produce almost no national or local programming, and have employees who are calling for his head?” asks Philadelphia Magazine.

  • Washington Post’s Howard Kurtz asks, “Out-of-Town Critics Too Tough On Thompson?”

  • A reader wonders whether shuster got the idea to ask blackburn…from moveon.org.

  • Media Week reports, “For the fourth consecutive season, Fox’s American Idol is network TV’s highest priced regular series for advertisers. The cost of a 30-second unit for upcoming episodes (which begin in January 2008) is $700,000 for both the Monday and Tuesday installments of the program, according to media buying and network sources.”

  • New York Times’ Brian Stelter reports, “When does a television show become an event worth covering on the evening news? Lately, the answer seems to be every week — at least when the show has high ratings expectations and runs on the same network as the newscast.”

  • TVNewser reports, “Juan Williams, whose conversation with Bill O’Reilly on The Radio Factor has been the subject of a week’s worth of cable and print stories, has written about being brought into the fray, and being labeled a ‘happy negro.’ He writes in Time magazine that he was ‘astounded’ to hear O’Reilly was being attacked ‘on the basis of that radio conversation as a ‘racist’”

  • Bloomberg reports, “The British Broadcasting Corp. bought travel guidebook company Lonely Planet, gaining a catalogue of 500 travel guides from Antarctica to Zimbabwe to boost holiday coverage on television and the Web and expand outside the U.K.”

  • TVNewser reports, “TVNewser tipsters tell us more executive changes could be in the works at ABC News. ABC NewsOne VP Kate O’Brian is being tasked with a project to review the assignment desk. The desk is currently overseen by VP of news coverage, Mimi Gurbst. What this means for Gurbst is not yet clear. An ABC insider says O’Brian’s review should be finished in a few weeks. The insider says the review had been planned before last week’s hiring of Dave Davis as ABC News’ new #2.”

  • Kansas City Star reports, “The U.S. military needs to get over its fear of the media and open up, a panel of officers told newspaper pundits Friday.”

  • New York Times reports, “As the newspaper industry bemoans falling circulation, major papers around the country have a surprising attitude toward a lot of potential readers: Don’t bother. The big American newspapers sell about 10 percent fewer copies than they did in 2000, and while the migration of readers to the Web is usually blamed for that decline, much of it has been intentional.”

  • AP reports, “They speak English at the BBC, but CBS News veteran Rome Hartman still faced a language barrier when he was hired to create a newscast specifically for American viewers.”

  • The New York Times reports, “During the next year or so, The St. Petersburg Times plans to continue pursuing deeply reported, long-term features about such topics as Florida’s property insurance crisis, complex tax issues, public education at all levels, and wildlife and endangered species. It will balance this slate of stories against all the other bread-and-butter issues it covers everyday for its readers: politics, business, sports, community affairs, culture and more.”

  • NY Post reports, “The appointment of Dave Davis as ABC News’ new No. 2 has roiled staffers who believe the shuffling of the news division’s executive suite was mandated by corporate parent Disney — or more specifically Disney-ABC Television Group President Anne Sweeney, sources said.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “New York Times Co. began a campaign to bolster awareness of NYTimes.com, less than two weeks after it stopped charging readers to access parts of the Web site of its flagship newspaper.”

  • PRNewsire reports, “A new survey finds that 101 million adult Americans now get most of their news from Web sites, while 35 million people rely on TV comedians and eight million individuals turn to blogs for their main source of news.”

  • Justin Fishel, Andy Rooney’s grandson, is FOX News’ new Pentagon producer.

  • Media Week reports, “Hearst Magazines is building a case that, properly done, sweepstakes can be a legitimate way to grow circulation as well as online traffic. In August, Hearst’s Good Housekeeping launched the Pay Off Your Mortgage sweepstakes, which led to such an increase in traffic and sub growth (a challenge for any mature title) that the company is applying the model across its other titles.”

  • TVNewser reports, “Two weeks before the TV network launches, the web component of Fox Business Network is up and running.”

    Jobs

  • Fraud Squad TV is looking for a TV Reporter.

  • International Resources Group is looking for a Writer/Editor and Research Analyst.

  • The Daily Progress is looking for a Photojournalist.

  • Cystic Fibrosis Foundation is looking for a Feature Writer/Editor.

  • Avalon Publishing Group is looking for a Guidebook Writer and a Seeking Hiking Guidebook Writer.

  • FierceMarkets, Inc. is looking for a Senior Editor, Telecom & Digital Media

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 06.20.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • Sorry Carl, but the readers have spoken. They think Bob is hotter.

  • An ABC release announced, “Despite experiencing reduced coverage two days last week due to the NBA Finals, ABC’s ‘World News with Charles Gibson’ was the #1 evening newscast among Total Viewers, Households and Adults 25-54 for the eighth consecutive week. Averaging 7.46 million Total Viewers and a 1.8/8 among Adults 25-54, ‘World News’ outperformed NBC by 330,000 Total Viewers and 100,000 key demo viewers.”

  • Reliable Source reports, “Any day now, Tracey Neale is going to briefly disappear from the airwaves, and now we know why: WUSA’s nightly anchor is adopting two children from Ethiopia.”

  • ‘Time’ Shoving Its Reluctant Writers Online

  • The Watergate Legacy, 35 Years Later

  • Politico’s straw poll wraps up today at noon. More info here.

  • “The changing arc of the immigration debate helped make it the biggest story the week of June 10-15, filling 10% of the overall newshole, according to PEJ’s News Coverage Index. (It was the leading subject in the cable (15%) and radio (11%) sectors.) The week marked the first time in 2007 that immigration was a No. 1 story.”

  • Blogging Into The Mainstream

  • Another ABC release announced, “ABC News Digital saw 10.2 million unique visitors in May of 2007 and ranked in eighth place in the Top 20 of general news sites, according to the Nielsen NetRatings. Since ABCNEWS.com relaunched in May emphasizing community participation, the site saw 132.5 million page views, up 21% year-to-year, according to ABC’s measurements.”

  • And ABC also announced, “All Democratic and Republican presidential candidates have confirmed their attendance at the two ABC News and ABC5/WOI-TV live debates in August 2007.”

  • One more way we journos are screwing up: “How the News Media Handicap Those with Disabilities

  • CNN’s Washington bureau sure is fertile these days.”

  • E&P reports, “The venue was a bit odd — an online chat marking the 35th anniversary of the Watergate burglary — but it produced one of the clearest admissions yet by Washington Post editor/reporter Bob Woodward that he was among the many who fumbled the ball on pre-war Iraqi WMDs.”

  • “Former Time Inc. Editor Norman Pearlstine defended his controversial decisions to release information to the courts in the highly publicized Valerie Plame CIA leak case, during a Q&A session sponsored by The Aspen Group on Monday.”

  • A reader writes in, “Wow The Politico paper has staples…and it looks good!”

  • According to the Hollywood Reporter, “More than 70 lawmakers Monday urged antitrust authorities to block the proposed merger of the nation’s two satellite radio companies, contending that the deal is anti-competitive.”

  • A reader writes in:
      Since when on earth is it actually illegal to copy and re-send a memo about, say, an anniversary picnic (which is a public event), a memo about changes at the paper that contains no financial or personnel information and which is also being reported elsewhere in the media via company press releases, or a memo about sections changes, retirements, hires, newsprint, parties, anniversary events, changes in editors, etc., etc., etc.? I do not believe that it is technically “illegal” to disseminate such particular information. It may be against a company policy, but it is likely not an illegal act that anyone could be charged with via the criminal courts of the United States criminal justice system.

      Also, it is bizarrely ironic that a newspaper that tries to stand up for journalism and reporting and communicating and open public records and reporting things that are usually kept secret is so paranoid and worried about the leaking of some very mundane and average memos about what are really not earth-shattering things. Isn’t this a newspaper that prods sources for news and sometimes uses sources who are also leaking information? So why get upset about someone sharing lame memos?

      Finally, does anyone at the Times understand basic p.r.? That paper can publish for 25 years–and still most people have not read a word in it, don’t care about it at all, and don’t even really know anything about it (this is actually very true–as recently as two days ago, some people said they had never read it, never seen it, and they thought it was owned by the people who owned the Star–the Star, which folded in 1981!). So you would think that a money-losing, stigma-attached, low-read paper would welcome any type of exposure and publicity and p.r.– even if it’s bad.

    Jobs

  • The American Bankers Association is looking for a Senior Designer.

  • The Association of American Medical Colleges is looking for a Staff Editor.

  • National Journal Group is looking for a Managing Editor for Technology Daily.

  • National Journal Group is looking for a Reporter for GovernmentExecutive.com

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext