FishbowlNY TVNewser TVSpy LostRemote AgencySpy PRNewser GalleyCat SocialTimes

Posts Tagged ‘Valerie Plame’

Supreme Court Rejects James Risen Appeal to Testify

Last week we wrote about a conversation with WaPo columnist David Ignatius and outed former CIA officer Valerie Plame with Atlantic Washington Editor-at-Large Steve Clemons on US and international intelligence.

During the conversation, Ignatius was asked about James Risen, the NYTimes reporter who appealed to the Supreme Court to not have to identify a confidential source. Today, the United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit, in Richmond, Va. rejected his appeal.

“On the specific question of Jim Risen, absolutely, he should not be compelled to reveal his sources,” offered Ignatius.

The issue dates back to a May 2011 subpoena received by Risen to identify a source for his 2006 book State of War: The Secret History of the CIA and the Bush Administration.
Read more

Mediabistro Course

Freelancing 101

Freelancing 101Starting December 1, learn how to manage a top-notch freelancing career! In this online boot camp, you'll hear from freelancing experts on the best practices for a solid freelancing career, from the first steps of self-advertising and marketing, to building your schedule and managing clients. Register now!

David Ignatius and Valerie Plame In Convo with The Atlantic

authorspanelLast night at the Watergate, WaPo columnist David Ignatius, who has covered the Middle East and the CIA for 25+ years, and outed former CIA officer Valerie Plame joined The Atlantic Washington Editor-at-Large Steve Clemons to discuss US and international intelligence. The conversation took place just hours before, and covered, NBC’s Brian Williams’ sit down with former NSA contractor Edward Snowden as well as last weekend’s mistakenly outing by the White House of Afghanistan’s CIA station chief. After the conversation, Ignatius and Plame signed copies of their books, including Ignatius’ newest, The Director, due out publicly next week.

For those who missed the conversation (like us, womp womp) The Atlantic posted it online and Hollywood on the Potomac’s Janet Donovan had a one-on-one with Plame. Check ‘em out, after the jump. Read more

Morning Splash

What’s Happening

— Luncheon with Ben Carson at the National Press Club, 12:30 p.m.

The Atlantic Exchange with David Ignatius and Valerie Plame, 5:30 p.m.

 

The Revolving Door

Know someone starting or leaving a job? Let us know.

 

Fishbowl Fun Fact

The Wright Brothers’ first flight was shorter than the wingspan of a Boeing 747.

 

Front Page of the Day

CA_OCR

 

 

 

Shuffle at WaPo Style

In an internal memo, WaPo shuffled Style around naming Rich Leiby Sunday and pop culture editor, “reeling” Scott Vogel from the Travel section and adding WaPo Mag’s Sydney Trent and her new feature, “The Read.” If you’re interested, the very long memo after the jump.

Read more

Taking Out The Trash

What we almost missed today…

Sunday Show ratings on TVNewser: NBC’s “Meet the Press” was the #1 public affairs show in Total Viewers this past Sunday, while CBS’ “Face the Nation”, which has the greyest host in Bob Schieffer, drew the most younger viewers.

And for the 11th straight week, ABC’s #2 “This Week” closed the gap with “Meet the Press.” Versus the same week last year, which was not Easter, “This Week” closed the total viewing gap with MTP by 74% (360,000 vs. last year).

Total Viewers: NBC: 3,210,000 / ABC: 2,850,000 / CBS: 2,750,000 / FOX: 1,200,000

25-54 demo: CBS: 1,100,000 / NBC: 1,090,000 / ABC: 950,000 / FOX: 440,000

• Huff Post picks up that George Will just about devoted an entire column to jeans in WaPo.

• NYPost reports actor Sean Penn originally wanted to cast Ann Coulter as Valerie Plame in “Fair Game.”

• Bo Obama already has his first children’s book in the works.

WaPo and Trulia have launched their new co-branded site on real estate in the DC region. Check it out here.

Morning Reading List 02.25.09

Good Morning FishbowlDC!

Got a blind item, interesting link, funny note, comment, birthday, anniversary or anything of the sort for Morning Reading List? Drop us a line or let us know in the tips box below.

Its day 37 covering the Obama administration and week 4 for us. Happy Birthday to Bob Schieffer, Jessica Yellin and Anne Kornblut!

And congratulations to Ryan Lizza and Chris Cillizza and their families, who welcome baby boys into the world. (h/t Playbook)

What we know and what we’re reading this Wednesday morning…

NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE | NEWS NOTES | JOBS

NEWPAPERS

In WaPo’s online chats yesterday, Gene Weingarten was asked about pre-empted column printed in Sunday’s paper. He calls the editor’s note a mistake, but a well-intentioned one, and a “dismaying overabundance of caution.” He was also posed this question, “Weingarten, you magnificent bastard, you engineered that whole promotion for your Sunday column, didn’t you?” He answered that the column did get 400 percent more online readership than it ususally does.

Heart Corp. announced yesterday possible significant cuts to staff at the San Francisco Chronicle.

Why everyone should care about the future of newspapers, from Paul Starr at the New Republic.

It is the end of an era for gossip columnist Liz Smith. After 33 years, the NYPost will be dropping her column.

TV

Liberal bias? A study at Indiana University indicates the opposite of what most people would think about television coverage of Democrats and Republicans during elections. The three major broadcast networks favored Republicans in elections from 1992 to 2004 and the professor conducting the study says that effect was largely due to journalists censoring their own reporting out of frustration at being accused of a liberal bias.

Broadcasting & Cable’s Marisa Guthrie has Q&A with NBC’s Brian Williams. Among many questions, she asks whether the Obama team has been successful in handling the media since they’re been in Washington? “I get a kick out of the coverage. I heard it as recently as last night on cable: ‘Have they lost their way?’ Now, we might want to remind everybody that the first few weeks of the Bush Administration were no different. It’s our attention span these days. It’s laughable.”

ONLINE

Rachel Sklar at the Daily Beast has the “smart power” list- what she calls “a subtle combination of brains and the wisdom to use them to get things done.” All the rage in Washington. DC journo NBC’s David Gregory makes the cut. Other journso on the list include CBS’ Katie Couric and CNN’s Rick Sanchez. NYT online, the Atlantic online and Politico also get a nod.

NEWS NOTES

Best Actor Sean Penn is in talks to star in “Fair Game,” the story of Valerie Plame, according to E! News. Naomi Watts is already lined up to play Plame.

The Courier-Journal of Louisville, KY has Q&A of WaPo’s and MSNBC contributor Eugene Robinson. He talks about the stimulus, Minority Leader Mitch McConnell and the difference between his column and cable news, to which he says, “What cable does, increasingly, is blur the line between reporting- which if done at all properly is going to be fair and nonpartisan- and commentary. And in the medium of cable television, that blurring seems to work. I say that only because it leads me to the conclusion that we’re going to see more of it.”

JOBS

News Distribution Network, Inc. is looking for an account manager. From the release: NDN has developed a unique business model to address the challenges of news properties, ownership groups, and organizations not currently equipped with legal, professional video content, advanced multimedia features, or effective distribution. NDN has debuted “Political I.Q.,” the first product in a portfolio slated to include offerings in the business, entertainment, sports, travel and general news categories.” More info and application available here.

HAT TIPS: Mediabistro, Romanesko, Playbook

Morning Reading List, 12.09.08

1207 006.JPG

Good morning, Washington. What DC street is this? Email us with your best guess and we’ll include correct guessers in tomorrow’s Morning Reading List.

Good morning Washington.

Got a blind item, interesting link, funny note, comment, birthday, anniversary or anything of the sort for Morning Reading List? Drop us a line or let us know in the tips box below.

We’ve got your morning mix of media Muesli after the jump…

Read more

Morning Reading List, 09.03.08

4345057.jpg

Good morning Washington.

Got a blind item, interesting link, funny note, comment, birthday, anniversary or anything of the sort for Morning Reading List? Drop us a line or let us know in the tips box below.

We’ve got your morning mix of media Muesli after the jump…

Read more

Morning Reading List, 11.13.07

morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • You think The Washington Post’s reaction to Tim Page was too harsh.

  • Mitt Romney Loses Coveted Endless Simmer Endorsement”

  • Is that CBS’s Matthew Felling hosting the Kojo Nnamdi Show today?

  • Get ready for tomorrow’s Meet the Press party…and Rush Limbaugh?!?

  • New York Times presents, “Stray Questions for: P.J. O’Rourke

  • New York Post reports,Jack Ford, the son of the late President Gerald Ford, is teaming up with magazine entrepreneur Don Welsh to launch a new publishing company, Mountain Time Publishing.”

  • Los Angeles Times reports, “Presidents and candidates have graced the covers of men’s style mags going back to John F. Kennedy, who posed in the Oval Office for the March 1962 issue of GQ. … For men, these magazines offer an opportunity to shape their images. … So why is a women’s fashion magazine a minefield for Hillary Clinton? It’s a double standard to be sure. A male candidate appearing in a men’s magazine is getting his message out. A female candidate appearing in a women’s magazine is falling into a stereotype and opening herself up to criticism for caring more about her looks than the issues.”

  • Reuters reports, “Investors punished shares of the Walt Disney Co and other large media companies on Friday after U.S. consumer sentiment hit a two-year low and sparked worries about cuts in advertising, analysts said.”

  • AP reports, “AOL, a subsidiary of Time Warner Inc. said Monday it purchased Yedda Inc., a social search question and answer service.”

  • Tech Check reports,Marc Andreessen Warns ‘Old Media’ Over Writers’ Strike”

  • Mel Karmazin, chief executive officer of Sirius Satellite Radio, met with the Tribune editorial board Wednesday to discuss the proposed merger of Sirius with XM Satellite Radio, shock jock Howard Stern and the intense competition in media markets.” Check it out here.

  • Andrew Sullivan speaks candidly” to Jennie Rothenberg Gritz “about why he supports Barack Obama, how he became a blogger, and why he’s not afraid to change his mind.”

  • Ad Age reports,Peggy Northrop is leaving her post as editor in chief at More magazine to become editor in chief of Reader’s Digest”

  • Washington Times reports, “Hollywood producer Joel Surnow dismissed as ‘nuts’ the notion that Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton can be elected president and said he and other conservatives in the entertainment industry are leaning toward supporting Republican Rudolph W. Giuliani’s presidential campaign.”

  • Redding News Review won its first “Black Web Award.” Congrats!

  • The PEJ Talk Show Index for the week of Oct. 28-Nov. 2, 2007 shows, “Thanks in part to the Democrats’ spirited debate in Philadelphia, last week was the biggest week of the year for the presidential campaign in the universe of radio and cable talk shows. The main course was the Democratic front runner who got carved up by hosts and pundits of various political stripes.”

  • The Independent reports, “The editor of ‘Time’ magazine, Richard Stengel, tells Ian Burrell why even his publication can’t afford to stand still if it wants to compete in an increasingly hi-tech industry.”

  • Journalism.co.uk reports, “Ifra will launch a vertical search engine for the newspaper industry in January, its CEO claimed.”

  • AP reports, “The first lead story on MinnPost.com, a new daily news site, is a 1,400-word report on the Minnesota Democratic Party’s finances. It’s not the kind of flashy tidbit guaranteed to goose online traffic. But flash isn’t the idea at MinnPost, a venture staffed mostly by recent casualties of newspaper downsizing.”

  • Internet News reports, “A few years ago, it might have seemed far-fetched to imagine representatives from traditional media stalwarts like The New York Times and MTV Networks urging others to follow their lead in adapting to survive an evolving online environment. But the times, they are a-changing.”

  • Check out Nick Sweezey’s contestant interview from Jeopardy!

  • Reason’s Marty Beckerman interviews Matt Taibbi, “Rolling Stone’s controversial chief political reporter on Campaign 2008, following Hunter S. Thompson, and his new book.”

  • WTTG launched a new Web site. Check it out here.

  • CNN reports, “The man who revealed that Valerie Plame worked for the CIA said that he was ‘extraordinarily foolish’ to leak her name. Former Deputy Secretary of State Richard Armitage was a source of the CIA leak to columnist Robert Novak. Former Deputy Secretary of State Richard Armitage told CNN’s Wolf Blitzer in an interview broadcast Sunday that he did not realize Plame was a covert agent when he discussed her with syndicated columnist Robert Novak.”

  • The Boston Globe reports, “As the television writers’ strike slowly gnaws its way through the TV grid, the question arises: What else is there to watch? Doesn’t Al Gore have some kind of television channel, among his many worthy pursuits? Maybe nobody there’s on strike.”

  • The New Republic’s Michael Crowley writes about, “Clinton’s strategy for crushing the media.”

  • Randy Bennett, Vice President of Audience and New Business Development for the Newspaper Association of America writes about the new Imagining the Future of Newspapers Blog. “We asked 22 of some of the more insightful thinkers we know to provide their perspectives on how newspapers can shape their own future. Some are currently employed by newspapers, but most are outside observers (analysts, futurists, academics, customers, etc.) without a vested interest in the success or failure of new business or journalistic approaches. There were no restrictions. All were free to write on any aspect of the newspaper business and offer up positive or negative prognoses. The goal: stimulate ideas and discussions about the newspaper franchise 5-10 years from now. We will be posting several commentaries a day (to give you time to digest) over the next week.”

  • The New York Times’ Public Editor writes,Sheryl Gay Stolberg, who covers the White House for The Times, gets a steady stream of complaints from readers about a curious issue. These readers, like Susan Lonsinger of Bakersfield, Calif., object to the fact that The Times refers to President Bush as Mr. Bush on second and later references in news articles. They think that’s disrespectful and that he should always be called President Bush.”

  • Deborah Howell writes, “A new president will be elected a year from now. Voters will look to the mainstream media, to alternative bloggers and to the candidates’ Web sites to help decide who that president will be. A perennial complaint is that the media cover politics too much as a horse race instead of reporting more on the candidates’ backgrounds, where they stand on issues and how they would lead the nation. But is it true? I intend to find out — at least at The Post — and report back to readers.”

  • The Columbia Tribune reports, “Consider the name: Pulitzer. Joseph Pulitzer and the prize named after him enjoy recognition and respect, especially in this town, home to the University of Missouri-Columbia School of Journalism. But how many people, including working journalists, know and appreciate the rich stories — both human and historical — behind those coveted gold medals? As it turns out, not very many, said Roy Harris Jr. — the author of ‘Pulitzer’s Gold’ — whose book fills a huge gap of knowledge about the coveted Public Service awards given for coverage of some of the biggest stories of the past 90 years, including the Ponzi scheme, the Great Depression, civil rights, Watergate, the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks and Hurricane Katrina.”

  • “FBNY discusses Slovenia, the age gap in comedy, the profitability of print media and a few other things” with The Onion’s Scott Dikkers.

  • CNN.com reports, “So, what exactly is news in a virtual world? CNN has opened an I-Report hub in the virtual world of Second Life. CNN aims to find out by opening an I-Report hub in Second Life, a three-dimensional virtual world created entirely by its residents.”

  • The New York Times reports, “The Federal Communications Commission is preparing to impose significant new regulations to open the cable television market to independent programmers and rival video services after determining that cable companies have become too dominant in the industry, senior commission officials said.”

    Jobs

  • Home Front Communications is looking for a Media Specialist.

  • WTOP Radio is looking for a Writer.

  • New Media AE is looking for DBC Public Relations Experts.

  • The Atlantic Media Company is looking for a Staff Correspondent to cover the White House for National Journal.

  • Home Front Communications is seeking Detail-Oriented Web Project Manager.

  • WUSA9 is looking for a Producer and an Executive Producer.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 10.24.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • You think global warming is no big deal.

  • An ABC release announced, “For the twenty-fourth time in twenty-six weeks, ‘World News with Charles Gibson’ was the #1 evening newscast among Adults 25-54. The ABC broadcast averaged a 2.1/9 and 2.58 million among key demo viewers, outperforming NBC’s ‘Nightly News’ by 70,000 for the week. This marks ABC’s best demo performance in five months (w/o 5/14/07). Among Total Viewers, ‘World News’ posted its highest delivery in nearly six months (w/o 4/23/07), averaging 8.1 million to NBC’s 8.2 million. The ABC broadcast also placed first among Households (5.7/12), tying NBC for the week.”

  • Matthew Felling on “The Drudge Effect.”
  • An NBC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research data, ‘NBC Nightly News with Brian Williams’ was the most-watched network evening newscast, winning the week of October 15-19, 2007. The NBC broadcast has now won for two straight weeks and for three of the last four weeks.”

  • Wall Street Journal reports, “In an era when commercial radio seems to be floundering, National Public Radio is hitting its stride. Some 25.5 million people tune into its programming each week, up from 13 million a decade ago. It has more than 800 member stations, up from 635 a decade ago. … Much of this growth has occurred under Ken Stern, NPR’s chief executive, who joined as executive vice president in 1999.”

  • Is The Washington Post into wife swapping? His Extreme-ness explains.

  • Tell Media Matters what you think. Take their survey here.

  • Baltimore Business Journal reports, “Senior citizens living in Europe and the Middle East will soon be able to watch shows produced for elderly audiences by Retirement Living TV, thanks to two new international deals expected to be unveiled this week. The television network, owned and operated by Catonsville-based Erickson Retirement Communities, signed it’s first international programming deal Monday with Anarey Communication’s Health Channel in Israel to air three of its feature shows. Terms of the deal were not disclosed.”

  • Commonwealth Times reports, “Jackie Jones, a former editor for The Washington Post, has spent her career working at more than 11 news services, but she tells VCU students not to resent small beginnings. … Jones came to VCU after she was awarded the 2007 Virginius Dabney Distinguished Professorship.”

  • USA Today offers an excerpt from Cathie Black’s Basic Black, “a thoughtful book on achieving success and balance in life. … Black, 63, oversees 19 magazines in the USA and 200 publications internationally — including Cosmopolitan, Good Housekeeping,Esquire and Harper’s Bazaar — as president of Hearst Magazines.”

  • “NPR to Self: Ixnay on the ‘Ixnay’

  • TVNewser reports, “If you were watching Fox News Channel this weekend then you noticed some programming changes. FNC SVP Bill Shine tells TVNewser he’s just ‘tweaking’ the schedule to see what works. Shine says being ‘in the middle of the NFL season’ is a good time to try out new anchors and new programs.”

  • Huffington Post’s Jason Linkins writes, “NYT Misses True Nature of Clinton-Drudge Relationship”

  • DCRTV points us to this release, announcing “The District of Columbia’s Office of Cable Television and Telecommunications has been officially renamed the DC Office of Cable Television, as set forth in an Administrative Order signed and released by Mayor Adrian M. Fenty.”

  • Bassam Sebti writes in the Washington Post, “What I Risked as an Iraqi Journalist”

  • Inside Cable News reports, “GretaWire blogs about her first interviews with Laura Bush as she follows the First Lady around the Middle East/Africa…”

  • AdAge reports, “HuffPo Will Lose a Lot More Than Money If It Doesn’t Pay Talent”

  • PR Week talks to Paul Pendergrass, “a self-described ‘lifetime flack,’ had a career working for Coca-Cola in almost all facets of communications in the US, Europe, and South Africa before opening his own consultancy in Atlanta in 2001.”

  • As of yesterday, “NPR’s The Bryant Part Project will take a look at nuclear power through a unique multimedia series — including four days of interviews and reports on the radio show and video and interactive features and discussions online.” For the full schedule, click here.

  • New York Post reports, “Another longtime publishing executive is exiting Time Inc. David Morris, who has been the publisher of Entertainment Weekly, is leaving the company after 21 years. The magazine will be swept under a new umbrella group called the Time Inc. Entertainment Group.”

  • ABC announced, “ABC News’ Chief Investigative Correspondent Brian Ross and the Investigative Unit have received the 2007 Online News Association Journalism Award for their reporting on the Mark Foley Congressional Page scandal on the Investigative Unit’s web page, ‘The Blotter,’ the Online News Association and the University of Southern California’s Annenberg School of Communications announced Friday.”

  • Reuters reports, “MediaNews Group Inc said on Monday that Hearst Corp bought a stake in the company for $317 million as part of a complex deal between the two privately held publishers involving several San Francisco-area.”

  • The Houston Chronicle reports, “The Houston Chronicle is cutting about 5 percent of its work force through layoffs and the elimination of open positions as it restructures the operations of the newspaper, Publisher and President Jack Sweeney said Monday. Approximately 70 employees will be affected by the changes.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “AOL, Time Warner Inc.’s Internet unit, is introducing wireless services to entice some of its 114 million monthly U.S. online visitors to access the company’s Web sites with their mobile phones.”

  • Campaign Standard reports on “a controversy brewing inside the Beltway.”

  • Poynter Online reports, “When Beijing was appointed to host the 2008 Olympic Games, it promised that foreign media would have the same ability to report as in previous Olympics; no less, no more. … Simply delivering on China’s original promise is hard enough, I was told by an insider of one of the larger news operations, because of the way this country is organized. This person’s news organization is bringing in hundreds of reporters, and it wants to broadcast from over 100 locations in China — just as like it did for Olympics in other nations.”

  • Check out Right-Wing Facebook, launched by People for the American Way and RightWingWatch.org.

  • Los Angeles Times reports, “Bernstein makes first visit to Nixon Library”

  • Sacramento Bee reports, “The last lingering detail of a complicated $1 billion newspaper sale by The McClatchy Co. has been wrapped up. Hearst Corp. has paid $317 million for a stake in Denver-based MediaNews Group Inc., according to a regulatory filing.”

  • On Plame’s book, The New York Times writes, “Her Identity Revealed, Her Story Expurgated”

  • Wonkette reports, “That’s ostensible born-again Christian Tom DeLay and ostentatious, drunken God-hater Christopher Hitchens making nice with each other at the Hill’s book fair last week!”

  • TVNewser reports, “Up against baseball, football, and some desperate housewives, FNC’s GOP debate in Orlando Sunday night pulled in a respectable 2,462,000 total viewers (live + same day), and 773,000 in the A25-54 demo.”

  • Romenesko reports, “From Joseph N. DiStefano, Philadelphia Inquirer: Knight Ridder did develop a plan to consolidate copy desks into a few regional centers, according to newspaper executives I talked to when I was covering the company in 2005-2006.”

  • McClatchy reports, “American taxpayers are helping to foot the bill so foreign writers can savor California wine. Subsidized by the Agriculture Department and the wineries, the writers from Canada, Europe and Asia tour some of this country’s most renowned wine regions, and winemakers say their stories boost foreign sales. Lawmakers agree, and they want to increase funding in the new farm bill that senators will consider next week.”

  • From The New York Observer: “Analyzing Bill Keller Analyzing War and Peace”

  • The Sacramento Bee reports, “Serious philosophers make the case that Jon Stewart is the Socrates of our day”

  • B&C reports, “Presidential candidate and Illinois Democratic Sen. Barack Obama wants Federal Communications Commission chairman Kevin Martin to take a series of intermediary steps before making the leap to rewrite media-ownership rules, saying that not to do so would be irresponsible.”

  • Reuters reports, “The New York Times Co reported a 6.7 percent rise in profit on Tuesday because of higher national advertising sales and a price increase for its flagship newspaper, sending its shares up as much as 8 percent.”

  • A release announced, “Archivist of the United States Allen Weinstein announced today that J. William Leonard, Director of the Information Security Oversight Office, who will be retiring from the post at year’s end, has agreed to become Senior Counselor to the Archivist beginning in January 2008.”

  • The Press Gazette reports, “Reuters has said that it is working with Nokia on a project that could ‘transform the way journalists file news reports on the move’. It is a new mobile application which the agency said is ‘a lightweight toolkit that provides everything journalists need to file and publish stories from even the most remote regions of the world.’”

  • New York Post reports, “American Heritage will rise again. Edwin S. Grosvenor has purchased the magazine, Web site and book division from the Forbes family with plans to resume publication with a December/January issue. The deal is for $500,000 in cash and the assumption of about $10 million in subscription liabilities, putting the deal’s total value at around $11 million.”

  • “This Wednesday evening at 6:30 PM, October 24, Martin Luther King, III, CEO of Realizing The Dream Foundation and AmericanLife TV Network (www.americanlifetv.com) will be hosting a reception and screening of the documentary ‘Poverty in America’. Reporter Nick Clooney and Representatives Barbara Lee (D-Calif.), John Lewis (D-Ga.) and Bruce Braley (D-Iowa) will also be in attendance.”

  • Reuters reports, “Comcast Corp said on Monday that file transfers on peer-to-peer networks such as BitTorrent may be delayed by bandwidth management technology, but it denied blocking access to any applications or content.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “Google Inc., owner of the world’s most popular search engine, offered to preserve some business practices at DoubleClick Inc. in a bid to win antitrust approval for its proposed $3.1 billion purchase of the company.”

  • Wired Magazine talks to James Murdoch “on Satellite TV, His Google Deal, and What Mogul Means”

  • Washington Times praises Fox’s Chris Wallace for his job as moderator during last weekend’s debate.

  • CNN announced in a release yesterday, “For her services to journalism, Christiane Amanpour, CNN’s chief international correspondent, today was awarded a Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE) by Queen Elizabeth II.”

  • Check out “Deborah Kanafani, Author of Unveiled and mb Instructor, on Writing Controversial Nonfiction vs. Controversial Memoir.”

  • A release announced, “Archivist of the United States Allen Weinstein and Wayne Metcalfe, vice president of the Genealogical Society of Utah, … announced a five-year partnership agreement to digitize case files of approved pension applications of widows of Civil War Union soldiers from the National Archives.”

  • Philadelphia Inquirer reports, “As moderator of Meet the Press, Tim Russert is the one who usually asks the tough questions. That role was reversed yesterday at the Gesu School in North Philadelphia. Russert chatted with eighth graders at the independent school, touching on the 2008 presidential election, before accepting the Magis Spirit Award for his support of Gesu and other local Jesuit ministries at a ceremony in the cozy first-floor library.”

  • TVNewser reports,Rush Limbaugh Gushes Over Erin Burnett

  • “This headline’s on the Post’s politics Web page. Well, has anyone ever seen them together in the same place at the same time? There’s only one way to find the truth: Look up Rudy’s skirt,” Wonkette suggests.

  • Inside Cable News writes,Mika Brzezinski: The next Andrea Mitchell?”

  • East West Magazine reports on the Dalhi Lama’s appearance in D.C. last week. “In closing remarks, the Dalai Lama pointed to the cameras in the back of the room where dozens upon dozens of the press gathered and said that the media has the role to educate and change society without ‘preaching’ and that education is a key to provoke positive change. “India, the Indian constitution is not a rejection of religion…it respects all beliefs, all equal…this interpretation, this inclusive secular way of education is very, very important.’”

  • A release announced, “Danny Heitman is the winner of the second annual In Character Prize for editorial and opinion writing about the human virtues, presented at an October 18th ceremony at New York City’s Yale Club. The Louisiana-native won the $10,000 prize for his essay ‘Daily Thanksgiving is Worth the Work,’ originally published in the November 22, 2006 edition of the Christian Science Monitor (also the publisher of last year’s winning essay).”

  • A USAToday release announced, “USATODAY.com announces the launch of five new widgets to its site, widgets.USATODAY.com. This second round of widgets will roll out through mid-November. Originally launched on Sept. 4, 2007, USATODAY.com’s widgets provide another way for consumers to experience and share news and information online in the manner that is most convenient to them. Users can use widgets to incorporate some of the most popular features of USATODAY.com on their blog, web page or social network.”

  • “In this month’s new and improved Video Pitch Slam 1-on-1, three hopeful writers pitch Blender editor-in-chief Craig Marks on camera with stories ranging from the music scene at the South Pole to a closing time anthem. The mag’s wide open to feature stories — for specifics, see our How to Pitch: Blender article — so keep watching to see if Craig buys anyone’s story.”

  • Media Matters’ Eric Boehlert writes, “Reading The New York Times’ coverage of the conservative Values Voter Summit held in Washington, D.C., this past weekend, where Republican presidential contenders paraded before evangelical activists, it was clear who the Times thought was the star of the event: Rudy Giuliani.”

  • Wonkette reports, “Today’s Washington Post crossword features an unusually meta pair of consecutive clues (16-and 17-Across). We’re anxious to see if the sudoku world will respond by encoding the 1 through 9 matrix to make fun of Oral Roberts.”

  • New York Times opines, “The administration’s distaste for a federal shield bill — and its claims that it threatens national security — should be seen as just another extension of its obsession with secrecy.”
  • You may have noticed that CNN’s logo has gone from red to green in honor of Planet in Peril, which aired last night and tonight from 9-11 ET.

  • Check out The memeorandum Leaderboard which “lists the sources most frequently posted to memeorandum.”

  • B&C reports, “CBS said it didn’t take any remedial action after the Federal Communications Commission found drama Without a Trace indecent back in 2006, saying it didn’t think it had to.”

  • Blogging on The Huffington Post, Valerie Plame writes, “I just learned the other day that my scheduled Tuesday appearance on the Charlie Rose show has been canceled. The show’s producer said it was because Charlie Rose wanted to prepare for an appearance next week by CIA Director General Michael Hayden. How ironic is that? I could have told Mr. Rose a few things about General Hayden, but I’m sure he’ll do a fine job with his interview questions without me.”

  • TVNewser reports, “Countdown with Keith Olbermann won the 8pmET hour in the A25-45 demo Friday night topping The O’Reilly Factor by 25,000 viewers (live+ same day). Bill O’Reilly still had the #1 program in total viewers with 1.4M, more than doubling Olbermann’s audience. O’Reilly was anchoring, but it was a previously aired program (Oct. 9).”

    Jobs

  • The McGraw-Hill Companies is looking for a Legal Correspondent.

  • Modern Luxury Media, LLC is looking for an Advertising Account Executive.

  • A National Consumer Magazine is looking for a Sales Representative-D.C., Philly, Baltimore.

  • The Gazette/Comprint Military is looking for a Reporter.

  • Voice of America is seeking a Senior TV Production Specialist.

  • CNSNews.com is looking for a Reporter.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • NEXT PAGE >>