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Posts Tagged ‘Walter Pincus’

After 48 hours, WaPo Corrects Pincus Column

Wow, a tough week for WaPo‘s Walter Pincus.

Roughly 48 hours after it was published, a column by Pincus on the involvement of WikiLeaks and Glenn Greenwald in the NSA leaks by Edward Snowden has been corrected.

On Wednesday morning, Greenwald, the Guardian columnist who broke the story involving Snowden and the NSA, wrote a column in response to a column by Pincus published Monday night. Pincus, through questions and innuendoes, accused Greenwald of working with WikiLeaks to coerce and aid Snowden in leaking the documents.

Greenwald pointed out factual errors and misrepresentations throughout. He also emailed Pincus to point out the same points and publicized the email.

Greenwald pointed out that at the time it was published Wednesday morning, the WaPo article stood untouched, with no corrections or editor’s notes added. This was 36 hours after the Pincus’ piece had published and 15 hours after Pincus emailed Greenwald back about the errors, Greenwald noted.

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Morning Reading List 07.10.13.

A fun day to be a Capitol Hill intern — As Republican congressmen prepared for a press conference about student loan rates, they knew they needed something to drive home their point and not bore everyone. So, as Politico’s Ginger Gibson reports, GOP staffers decided to make use of the packs of college students in their offices and instructed a mass of interns to stand in the 90-degree heat on the steps behind House Speaker John Boehner and other Republicans as they slammed Democrats over the student loan rate increase. Many speakers make use of backdrops at press conferences and similar events, and they’re not always made up of sweaty interns. Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) makes use of backdrops quite frequently. Most recently at a similar event on student loans, Pelosi invited students from various campus leadership organizations and had some of the student leaders speak.

Why you should read it: This is proof that you’re not having the worst day. Sure, you may have sources that don’t understand deadlines and editors that don’t understand sources, but at least you’re not an intern  being used as a prop and stuffed into a suit and tie in 90-degree heat.

Greenwald fires back at Pincus — On Monday night WaPo published a piece by Walter Pincus questioning the role of Guardian’s Glenn Greenwald in the leak of NSA documents by Edward Snowden. In response, Greenwald wrote a column that slammed Pincus and the article, which he wrote “concocted a frenzied and inane conspiracy theory” that the reporter worked secretly with WikiLeaks and Julian Assange to mastermind Snowden’s leak. Greenwald charged that Pincus’ story was built on the fact that Greenwald had written a piece for the WikiLeaks Press’s blog, an assertion the Guardian reporter said is completely false. Greenwald emailed Pincus a lengthy email about the false claims and leading questions in his story. Upon realizing that the claim of Greenwald writing for the blog were false, Pincus vowed to correct the mistake. But 15 hours later, there was still no correction. (As we’re writing this, the story has still not been corrected.) Greenwald said he normally wouldn’t bother writing the column, as “shoddy journalism from the Washington Post is far too common to be worth noting,” but he felt he needed to bring the “wild conspiracy theorizing” to light.

Why you should read it: The story that started with Snowden leaking documents has grown to include a wide cast of characters with more plot twists than M. Night Shyamalan can think up, and it only gets more compelling with each turn.

 

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Hohmann – the “Future” of Journalism: At Politico, not WaPo

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WaPo‘s national security reporter Walter Pincus may have given then-WaPo intern James Hohmann a high form of praise, calling him the “future” of journalism. But this was before the young scribe flew the coop and switched over to Politico. (In the above photographs we imagine what the experience must have been like for him…)

Politico‘s Mike Allen harshes on WaPo in this morning’s Playbook.

“OUCH: In “Morning Miracle,” Dave Kindred’s forthcoming book about trying times at The Washington Post, the legendary Walter Pincus says of then-Post-intern James Hohmann: “He’s the future.” Today, Hohmann celebrates six months with POLITICO.”

Instead of remaining at WaPo, where he could have landed a paying job post internship, Hohmann moved to Politico.

FishbowlDC Interview: Spy Guy Jeff Stein

stein4.jpg If you don’t read Jeff Stein‘s Spy Talk blog on CQPolitics.com, you’re missing out. It’s chocked full of quick reads about real spies, espionage, the CIA, FBI and Secret Service.

Don’t be scared off by its tag line “Intelligence for Thinking People” — I read it regularly. We caught up with CQ‘s resident spy guy for a FishbowlDC interview that required neither intelligence nor thinking. Here’s what we learned:

What does your morning reading list include? All the major nupes — WaPo, NYT, WSJ — in paper, since I’m allergic to electrons before coffee. In fact, I just started a new policy of not looking at my Blackberry until I’ve finished them.

How did you start writing your beat? SpyTalk, which began as a weekly column in 2005, was the joint idea of me and the top editors here — Bob Merry, David Rapp (both of whom have since left) and Mike Mills (who has just returned).

What was the proudest moment in your career? Maybe the successful 2002 debut of CQ/Homeland Security, which I was hired originally to launch, making money and winning an Online News Association award in its first year.

Have you ever been worried about your personal safety due to the nature of your beat? Only once, when my main source for stories about about U.S.-based anti-Castro Cuban terrorists, was murdered.

Who is your favorite fictional spy and why? Smiley, of course: Stoic, patient, clever and empathetic — to a point.

What’s your favorite spy book? “The Quiet American,” by Graham Greene.

What is the biggest misconception about spies or spying? That it’s anything like James Bond or Jack Bauer.

How many times have you visited the Spy Museum? It’s a great place to meet sources.

What working journalist do you respect the most (excluding CQ/RC)? Walter Pincus, investigative reporting’s Lou Gehrig.

What single person has played the biggest role or has had the biggest influence on your career? The late, great David Halberstam, who opened doors for me with editors in New York.

If you could spy on one person undetected, who would it be? Jane Harman. Just kidding. Osama Bin Laden, of course.

More Q&A after the jump…

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Kurtz on Off-the-Record Discussions and Network Interviews with the President

A few interesting items in Howie Kurtz‘s online WaPo chat yesterday, Critiquing the Press:

Washington, D.C.: When Walter Pincus revealed off-record discussions between Josh Block and three reporters, did he rat out any of his Post colleagues?

Intelligence Pick Blames ‘Israel Lobby’ For Withdrawal (Post, March 12)

If one reporter at the Post, sitting in his cubicle, promises a source confidentiality, and a reporter in an adjacent cubicle overhears the conversation and can figure out who the source is, can that second reporter write a story free of that privilege?

Howard Kurtz: Reporting on an overheard conversation would be flat-out unfair. But there are times when journalists have had to report on the confidential sources of other journalists, even in their own newsroom. I, for instance, had to question who Washington Post reporters had used as sources in the Valerie Plame affair (as well as those used by Bob Novak, Matt Cooper, Tim Russert, Judy Miller et al). I did not know who the sources were until that information emerged in the court proceedings and Bob Woodward eventually acknowledged the administration source who told him about Plame’s CIA role.

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Morning Reading List, 03.27.08

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Good morning Washington. Dana Bash and John King will get married on Cape Cod over Memorial Day weekend.

Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | BOOKS | JOBS

  • You would rather hang out with Barack Obama over Michelle.

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • Atlantic Names New Publisher Jay Lauf

  • More Changes to ABC News Executive Ranks

  • Andrea Jones is leaving her position as Executive Director of ABC News and Emily Lenzner is taking her place.

  • Linda Greenhouse Returning To Yale Law School in 2009 as Journalist-in-Residence

  • A release announced, “Michael Flagg, a veteran business reporter and editor at the Los Angeles Times, Wall Street Journal, Bloomberg and the Washington Post, has joined the Washington, D.C. office of Manning Selvage & Lee (MS&L) as senior vice president. His appointment is effective immediately.”

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    NEWSPAPERS

  • The Washington Times won seven awards in the 2007 Virginia Press Association’s annual competition for writing, photography, artwork and news design.

  • A reader asks, “Why was McCain off limits with the media? Is it because of his advanced years or because he’s a war hero or both? everything was coming up roses for McCain with the Media. Guess that was good for him, since his senior moments crop up every once in awhile.”

  • Finding Political News Online, the Young Pass It On

  • Huffington Post’s Thomas Edsall presents, “Interview With Walter Pincus On The State Of The Press”

  • Romenesko has “Tribune innovation chief Lee Abrams’ e-mail to staff”

  • AJR asks, “Why is the media consensus so often wrong about political campaigns? And isn’t there a better way to cover elections?”

  • The AP reports, “New York Times Co. President and Chief Executive Janet Robinson received total compensation valued at $2.1 million in 2007 but got no stock options, reducing her pay 38 percent from a year ago, according to calculations by The Associated Press.”

  • AJR reports, “Why news organizations have to act much more boldly if they are to survive”

  • Check out Green Room Girl’s latest pictures featuring Howard Wolfson and David Brooks.

  • Nielsen Online Names Top 30 News Sites

  • Portfolio’s Mixed Media reports, “The New York Times has been around for 156 years. For all that time, it has trusted its readers, more or less, to find what they’re looking for. Not anymore. Today saw the introduction of ‘Inside the Times,’ a new multi-page index of that day’s highlights, in print and online, which runs on pages 2, 3 and 4 of section A. The purpose is ‘to help readers navigate and mine the paper and its Web site,’ according to an editor’s note.”

  • Politico, Viacom, Paramount Vantage are teaming up to present a private screening of the new Rolling Stones, Scorsese Shine a Light film on the eve of the White House Correspondent’s dinner, April 25th at the National Cable & Telecommunications Association.

  • Kelly Flynn writes, “No news is bad news for Kearsley journalism students”

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    TV

  • Mark your calendars! On April 2, nine women will speak at the “Women on the World” at the Chamber of Commerce, including Daryn Kagan, Jenna Bush, Andrea Koppel, Kelly O’Donnell and Donna Brazile. For more on what Kagan has been up to, click here.

  • A CNN release announced, “Following a campaign coverage strategy of creating mini-bureaus in key political battleground states, CNN has parked the CNN Election Express in Philadelphia this week to create a full-time reporting presence for the April 22 Pennsylvania primary.”

  • TVNewser reports, “This morning marked new NBC/MSNBC analyst Harold Ford, Jr.’s first appearance on Morning Joe. Co-anchor Joe Scarborough brought up his time in congress with Ford, and how the pair ‘transcended politics,’ as they sat on opposite sides of the aisle.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “U.S. advertising spending was little changed in the fourth quarter as a weakening economy prompted marketers to cut newspaper and radio ads, according to TNS Media Intelligence.”

  • USA Today reports, “Advertisers and marketers, struggling to keep up with changing consumer habits, are about to make massive investments in new digital and out-of-home media platforms, according to a forecast out today from research firm PQ Media.”

  • A release announced, “FOX 5 finishes the March 2008 news race as the #1 choice for late news in key adult demographics, announced Duffy Dyer, the station’s Vice President and General Manager. ‘FOX 5 News Edge at 11′ and ‘FOX 5 News at 10′ rank #1 in their respective time periods.”

  • JackMeyers.com reports, “Assuming this week’s release of fourth quarter GDP data confirms an official recessionary economy, marketers, media companies, economists and unofficial economic pundits will weigh in with appropriately reactionary forecasts of ad industry doom and gloom.”

  • The Wall Street Journal reports, “Over the past two years, Lynda Clarizio has helped build Advertising.com, AOL’s ad network, into one of the hottest properties in online advertising. Her reward: She gets to try to clean up one of the Internet company’s messiest divisions.”

  • The Wall Street Journal reports, “The two biggest U.S. cable providers, Comcast Corp. and Time Warner Cable Inc., are discussing a plan to provide funding for a new wireless company that would be operated by Sprint Nextel Corp. and Clearwire Corp., people familiar with the talks say.”

  • The New York Observer reports, “On the morning of Friday, March 21, Chris Wallace woke up at his home in Washington, D.C., grabbed some fruit and yogurt, and turned on the Fox News early show, Fox & Friends. Steve Doocy, Gretchen Carlson and Brian Kilmeade were talking about Barack Obama’s recent characterization of his grandmother on a Philadelphia radio show: She was a ‘typical white person, who, if she sees somebody on the street that she doesn’t know, there’s a reaction that’s been bred into our experiences that don’t go away and that sometimes comes out in the wrong way.’ ‘Can you say ‘typical white person’ if you’re white?’ asked Mr. Doocy. Of course not, noted Ms. Carlson. There’s no way that Senator Hillary Clinton could use the phrase ‘typical black person,’ they noted. ‘So there is a certain double standard in society,’ said Ms. Carlson. And also: ‘I sort of take offense at that line: ‘typical white.” Mr. Wallace was getting a little bit annoyed. ‘I didn’t think it was fair. I didn’t think it allowed Obama to make his point,’ Mr. Wallace later told The Observer in a telephone interview.”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • 24/7 Wall St. presents, “The Twenty-Five Most Valuable Blogs”

  • Media Matters’ Eric Boehlert writes, “How dreadful was the news coverage last week surrounding the official release of Hillary Clinton’s public White House schedule from her eight years as first lady? So bad that I found myself in rare (unprecedented?) agreement with at least two prominent conservative bloggers who noticed the same thing I did: The Beltway press corps is, at times, a national embarrassment.”

  • Huffington Post’s Rachel Sklar reports, “Hillary Clinton’s Bosnia Story A Hit On YouTube!”

  • Gangrey.com presents the winner of the 2008 Goat Awards.

  • Media Week reports, “Time Inc., which has been hit by sweeping layoffs in recent years, has continued to pare its head count in its quest for cost-savings, albeit in smaller ways. This Old House shed four people in the past few weeks in communications, production and TV production, while at Sports Illustrated, a handful of people were laid off from the title’s Picture Collection archive. (Some of the SI staffers were to be assigned to other positions in the company, a Time Inc. spokesperson said.)”

  • Mesh Media Strategies reports, “I was privileged to join a group of bloggers, along with TV news executives and personnel from the Washington DC area, Monday night for a reception and private tour of the soon-to-open Newseum in the nation’s capital. In a word, it is spectacular.”

  • The Annenberg School for Communication at USC Online Journalism Review reports, “J-schools need to encourage and develop, not inhibit, students’ passion — not only for the favorite topics, but for the craft of journalism itself.”

  • MinOnline reports, “Tribune Media Services (TMS), the content syndication and licensing division of Chicago-based Tribune Company, will launch a new weekly political commentary magazine called Opinionated: Voices and Viewpoints on America and the World.”

  • The San Jose Business Journal reports, “Yahoo Inc.’s HotJobs feature on Tuesday launched a search ranking algorithm called REAL — Relevance, Engagement, Availability and Location. Sunnyvale-based Yahoo (NASDAQ:YHOO) said the system is part of an overall strategic initiative designed to ‘make the recruiting process more efficient using Yahoo technology and to provide recruiters with unique insights into job seeker behavior.’”

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    MAGAZINES

  • Reader’s Digest’s Carl Cannon was interviewed on C-SPAN by Bob Schieffer this past weekend. Check out the interview here.

  • What you missed last night: Atlantic Media’s Journalism on Tap, a panel discussion on the upcoming election.

  • WWD.com reports, “Financial market turbulence, housing bubble bursts, Bear Stearns collapses — no wonder advertising isn’t looking rosy (or that most publishers don’t want to go on the record and talk about it). As the end of the first half draws near for magazines, business looks soft. Through April, the latest Media Industry Newsletter numbers show ad pages declined for most fashion titles and the unpredictable economy makes it impossible to predict how things will end up by June, much less the entire year.”

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    RADIO

  • A release announced, “Beginning Wednesday, April 2, at 9 p.m., the National Symphony Orchestra will return to the airwaves of Classical WETA 90.9 FM. Performances are being drawn from NSO archives, and most broadcast programs will feature repertoire from multiple NSO concerts. These two-hour broadcasts will take place on the first Wednesday of each month for the next year. WETA’s John Chester will host. The series is made possible by WETA’s Friends of Classical Music, including Patricia Sagon.”

  • The Wall Street Journal writes, “The Justice Department’s approval this week of the XM-Sirius satellite radio merger was a long time coming — maybe too long given that the deal was announced more than a year ago. Still, credit Antitrust Division chief Thomas Barnett for making the right call in the end.”

  • The Wall Street Journal reports, “One of the marquee deals of the now-faded corporate buyout boom was close to collapse Tuesday night, a victim of the credit-market turmoil that began last summer. The planned $19 billion privatization of the nation’s largest radio broadcaster, Clear Channel Communications Inc., looked increasingly likely to fall through as the private-equity firms and banks backing the transaction failed to resolve their differences over final financing terms, people familiar with the matter said. It would be one of the biggest leveraged buyouts yet to implode as the upheaval in global credit markets has made it nearly impossible for banks that financed such deals to spread their risk by packaging their loans for sale to other investors. That’s left many banks exposed to massive losses they have been trying to avoid.”

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    BOOKS

  • GalleyCat answers the question, “How’s Book Publishing Handling the Election?”

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    JOBS

  • Politico is looking for a Weekend Editor.

  • Human Events is hiring a Manager Editor.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 03.17.08

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    Happy St. Patrick’s Day Washington.

  • Sunday was Ellen McCarthy’s birthday. Today is Tim Burger’s and Mark Paustenbach’s and Saturday was Jenny 8 Lee’s.

    Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

    REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | BOOKS | JOBS

  • Email is your favorite way to communicate.

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • Karen Hosler has left the Baltimore Sun.

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    NEWSPAPERS

  • A release announced, “The Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel is the winner of the 2007 Thomas L. Stokes Award for Energy Writing. Reporters Thomas Content, Lee Bergquist and Joel Dresang will share a $1,000 check and receive individual citations for the yearlong project.”

  • Justice and the Press

  • The AP reported that The Washington Examiner’s Nate Beeler won a Virginia Press Association award “for a portfolio of three editorial cartoons.”

  • Clark Hoyt says the Times was fooled again.

  • Deb Howell on “A Reporting Coup and Its Critics.”

  • Celebrated History of the CIA Comes Under Belated Fire

  • With Order to Name Sources, Judge Is Casting a Wide Net

  • Are job cuts death knell for America’s newspapers?

  • National Journal’s William Powers writes, “When some people first heard the news about New York Gov. Eliot Spitzer and a prostitution ring, they thought: How awful, how tragic, how corrupt. When I first heard it, I thought: Thank God for newspapers.”

  • E&P reports, “A dispute over a Pulitzer Prize finalist in investigative reporting has emerged between The Denver Post and the Charlotte (N.C) Observer. The conflict sparked a phone call Wednesday from Observer Editor Rick Thames to Post Editor Greg Moore, who is also a Pulitzer Board member. Moore says he is now ‘writing a letter about it.’”

  • Walter Pincus Rips into Newsroom Neutrality

  • The Washington Post reports, “In his youth, Ivory Wilson says, he drove a Bentley, drank Hennessy and rolled joints with $100 bills. Now he’s a middle-aged man, bent but not broken, homeless but not hopeless, writing fiction for Street Sense, the District’s twice-monthly newspaper written by and about the area’s homeless.”

  • The Q&A Cafe will feature The Washington Post’s Len Downie on April 10.

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    TV

  • TVNewser reports, “You know a presidential primary is really important when…a news program that rarely goes on the road decides to pull up stakes and do just that. With Pennsylvania the focus of attention on April 22, PBS anchor Jim Lehrer will broadcast The NewsHour from Pittsburgh during the week of April 21.”

  • Bob Schieffer: Who says there isn’t life after TV?

  • Iraq war disappears as TV story

  • Rove on Fox: It’s Fair to Say He’s Mellowed

  • Business Week reports, “Ever since Brian L. Roberts abandoned a hostile bid for Walt Disney (DIS) four years ago, Wall Street has wondered when the Comcast (CMCSA) chief executive and serial acquirer might make a play for another big media prize. The chatter picked up last fall, just before America’s largest cable company confessed that it would add fewer subscribers than expected in the fourth quarter. Some investors worried that, with growth slowing, Roberts might try to pick off Yahoo! (YHOO) or NBC Universal (GE) — diversifying away from cable by wading into the murky waters of ‘content.’”

  • Information Week reports, “The U.S. Federal Communications Commission is defending the way it tracks complaints, investigations, and enforcement, and it claims a critical government report is based on several inaccuracies. The U.S. Government Accountability Office issued a 53-page report this week saying the FCC doesn’t properly collect and analyze data, making it impossible to analyze the effectiveness of its enforcement.”

  • Michael Calderone reports, “Fox launches ‘Obama Watch’”

  • TVNewser reports, “A tornado that tore through downtown Atlanta did not spare the CNN Center. This morning the network has been covering the aftermath of the severe weather, and the potential for more today. Anchor Betty Nguyen took viewers on a tour of part of the newsroom ‘where our writers and our producers sit.’ It is now covered with blue tarp. The tornado shattered windows in the newsroom and damaged the roof in the atrium which, until 2003, was the studio for the CNN daytime program, Talk Back Live.” And, “After last night’s tornado, CNN was taking no chances today. The blog Newscast Studio added, ‘Today CNN was thrown another curve ball…CNN’s Frederica Whitfield uses the CNN International set to bring the news to the viewers.’”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • The Project for Excellence will release the State of the News Media 2008 report today at www.stateofthenewsmedia.org.

  • Richard Prince writes, “A front-page photo of Sen. Barack Obama in the New York Times last week showed the Democratic front-runner on his campaign plane as a number of hands holding tape recorders reached up to him. None of the hands appeared to be black or brown. It seemed ironic in that Obama is the first African American with a serious chance to be president, running in a campaign in which the nuances of race have been discussed as never before.”

  • Poynter Online reports, “Newspapers and online publishers appear to be heading back into battle against search engine behemoth Google.”

  • Politico.com has been redesigned.

  • Web Has Unexpected Effect on Journalism

  • Find out here what His Extreme-ness calls “Just Whore-ible”

  • strong>Laurel Touby Holds Fake Presser

  • The AP reports, “Microsoft Corp. Chairman Bill Gates said Thursday he expects the next decade to bring even greater technological leaps than the past 10 years.”

  • Is KickApps Next to Board AOL’s Gravy Train?”

  • A release announced, “OhMyGov!, the only website devoted to improving bureaucracy through the spread of information, ideas, innovative online tools, and strategic satire, today announced the launch of its pilot site, www.ohmygov.com, for beta testing.”

  • Conde Nast’s Portfolio asks, “Google’s business model of internet-search-driven advertising has become so dominant that competitors Microsoft and Yahoo can hardly compete. But will C.E.O. Eric Schmidt be able to keep Google true to its roots?”

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    MAGAZINES

  • It’s that time of year again. “Nominate yourself or a colleague for the 2008 Campaigns & Elections’ Politics magazine Rising Stars.” Entries should be submitted by April 18, 2008 and emailed to risingstars@campaignsandelections.com.

  • The New York Observer reports, “At Columbia, The Inadvertently Boldface Joanne Lipman Sticks to the Script”

  • Mike Allen’s Playbook reports, “Jon Meacham and his wife, Keith, are celebrating the arrival of No. 3 — Margaret Randolph Meacham, to be called Maggie. You’d never know her folks are from Tennessee and Mississippi. They’ll see you in 18 years.”

  • Also from Mike Allen, “Jay Carney and Claire Shipman opened their home to a celebration for TIME Nation Editor Amy Sullivan’s new book, ‘The Party Faithful: How and Why Democrats Are Closing the God Gap.’ TIME Managing Editor Richard Stengel was also a host. Guests included Mike McCurry, Walter and Cathy Isaacson, Sally Quinn, Dana Bash, Howard Kurtz, Sam Feist, Chris Matthews and David Bohrman. Among many others, Sullivan thanked her fiance, The New Republic’s Noam Scheiber.”

  • Market Watch’s Jon Friedman tells us about, “Three magazines that deserve better fates”

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    RADIO

  • Innovator rethinking Tribune ways

  • Hollywood Reporter reports, “The future of Time Warner, MGM, Lionsgate, Liberty Media, satellite radio and the general outlook for mergers and acquisitions in the media and entertainment field were in the spotlight Thursday at McGraw-Hill’s 2008 Media Summit New York. ‘There is going to be a lot of M&A activity’ despite the recent credit crunch, said Santo Politi, co-founder and general partner of Spark Capital, during a panel on the industry’s deal outlook. His rationale: Media giants have become more active in pursuing digital companies as they embrace the digital future and private-equity firms’ ability to bid in deals is hurt by the crunch.”

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    BOOKS

  • Jennifer 8. Lee will be at Sixth & I Historic Synagogue at 600 I Street, NW tonight for a Politics & Prose event.

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    JOBS

  • The McLaughlin Group is looking for a Writer/ Producer.

  • Child Welfare League of America is looking for an Associate Editor/Writer.

  • Washington Business Journal is looking for a Web Reporter.

  • The Associated Press is looking for an APTN Newsperson.

  • Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay is looking for a Director of Communications.

  • Need To Know News is looking for a Financial Reporter.

  • NSSEA is seeking an Entry-Level Editorial Assistant.

  • World Resources Institute is looking for a Communications Coordinator — GHG Protocol, World Resources Institute.

  • National Journal Group is looking for an Account Executive.

  • Dickstein Shapiro LLP is looking for a Website Administrator.

  • Food & Water Watch is looking for an Advocacy Writer.

  • The Map Network, a NAVTEQ Company, is looking for a Destination Account Manager.

  • Congressional Quarterly is looking for a Defense Reporter and an Energy Policy Reporter.

  • A New Web Channel is looking for a Capitol Hill Correspondent/Fill-in Anchor.

  • National Public Radio is looking for a Senior Interactive Designer.

  • National Consumer Magazine is looking for an Associate Editor.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • “Pincus Reveals Fleischer As Leak Source”

    From the Post:

      Washington Post reporter Walter Pincus testified in court this morning that then-White House press secretary Ari Fleischer, not I. Lewis “Scooter” Libby, was the first person to tell him that a prominent critic of the Iraq war was married to undercover CIA officer Valerie Plame.

    Read the rest here.

    Post Issues Correction

    The Washington Post issued a correction to Walter Pincus and R. Jeffrey Smith piece today entitled, “Official’s Key Report On Iraq Is Faulted: ‘Dubious’ Intelligence Fueled Push for War”:

      A Feb. 9 front-page article about the Pentagon inspector general’s report regarding the office of former undersecretary of defense Douglas J. Feith incorrectly attributed quotations to that report. References to Feith’s office producing “reporting of dubious quality or reliability” and that the office “was predisposed to finding a significant relationship between Iraq and al Qaeda” were from a report issued by Sen. Carl Levin (D-Mich.) in Oct. 2004. Similarly, the quotes stating that Feith’s office drew on “both reliable and unreliable reporting” to produce a link between al-Qaeda and Iraq “that was much stronger than that assessed by the IC [Intelligence Community] and more in accord with the policy views of senior officials in the Administration” were also from Levin’s report. The article also stated that the intelligence provided by Feith’s office supported the political views of senior administration officials, a conclusion that the inspector general’s report did not draw.The two reports employ similar language to characterize the activities of Feith’s office: Levin’s report refers to an “alternative intelligence assessment process” developed in that office, while the inspector general’s report states that the office “developed, produced, and then disseminated alternative intelligence assessments on the Iraq and al Qaida relationship, which included some conclusions that were inconsistent with the consensus of the Intelligence Community, to senior decision-makers.” The inspector general’s report further states that Feith’s briefing to the White House in 2002 “undercuts the Intelligence Community” and “did draw conclusions that were not fully supported by the available intelligence.”