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Joe Ciarallo

How To Win a Webby Award

“Make something incredible for the Internet.” It’s that simple, says David-Michel Davies, Executive Director of International Academy of Digital Arts and Sciences, the organization behind the well known web awards show.

The Webby’s are also known for their five word acceptance speeches. Yes, that’s right, all speeches must be kept to five words only.

Davies said the team got the idea for the short speeches after watching the Oscar’s, where the speeches were too long and “seemed not that interesting to the audience,” he said.

So they came up with a shorter way for people to present. Much shorter. “The Internet is all about brevity,” said Davies.

Which winners have given his favorite acceptance speeches? Watch the video to find out.

Part 1: Internet Week Chairman: ‘We Created This As An Open Platform’

Part 3: Internet Week Chairman On Why He Ditched His Blog for Twitter

Media Beat is mediabistro.com’s interview series with the movers and shakers of the media world. View all past episodes at MediaBeat.com and follow Media Beat on Twitter.

Internet Week Chairman: ‘We Created This As An Open Platform’

The third annual “Internet Week” is upon us in New York, so in this week’s episode of Media Beat, we spoke with the man behind it all: Internet Week Chairman and Executive Director of International Academy of Digital Arts and Sciences, David-Michel Davies, or “DMD” for short.

The week has grown to include more than 100 events this year, and any company or organization can submit an event and be included. “We created this as an open platform” said Davies, “modeled after the Internet.”

While planning for the first Internet Week three years ago, Davies said “we really had to pursue people,” to participate. However this year, “it’s really turned around, we have hundreds of people calling, trying to get involved in different ways.”

While we’re talking about Internet Week events, RSVP for mediabistro.com’s Internet Week party tomorrow.

Part 2: How To Win a Webby Award

Part 3: Internet Week Chairman On Why He Ditched His Blog for Twitter

Media Beat is mediabistro.com’s interview series with the movers and shakers of the media world. View all past episodes at MediaBeat.com and follow Media Beat on Twitter.

Tyrangiel: ‘People Don’t Read Brands Out of Obligation Anymore’

Josh Tyrangiel, editor of Bloomberg Businessweek, obviously works at a well-known, storied media brand. Or as some would rightly say, two brands combined.

However, Tyrangiel understands that media brands can’t rest on their laurels in the digital age. “People don’t read brands out of obligation anymore,” he said.

When asked about how legacy media brands can stay relevant, Tyrangiel said, “you have to be in constant flux mode,” and added that he’d like to see Bloomberg Businessweek on “as many platforms as possible.”

“Ultimately I’d love to be able to say to people who enjoy what we do, ‘You can get it everywhere, and you can get it everywhere at this price,’” he said.

Part 1: Bloomberg BusinessWeek Editor: Compensating Writers Based on Pageviews Doesn’t Make Sense For Us

Part 2: Josh Tyrangiel on Business Reporting: ‘What I’m Noticing Is a Lot More Skepticism’

Media Beat is mediabistro.com’s interview series with the movers and shakers of the media world. View all past episodes at MediaBeat.com and follow Media Beat on Twitter.

Josh Tyrangiel on Business Reporting: ‘What I’m Noticing Is a Lot More Skepticism’

In part two of our Media Beat interview with Josh Tyrangiel, editor of Bloomberg Businessweek, we talk about the state of business and financial reporting.

“I’m new to the incredible pressurized coverage that comes along with being market based,” he said, referencing his move to Bloomberg BusinessWeek from TIME.com.

However, Tyrangiel did say that in the past, “everyone was a market cheerleader…and what I’m noticing is a lot more skepticism.” He also has to adjust to an earlier schedule, starting the day at 7:30 a.m.

As he said, “At 9 a.m., all hell breaks loose.” Watch the video for more.

Part 1: Bloomberg BusinessWeek Editor: Compensating Writers Based on Pageviews Doesn’t Make Sense For Us

Part 3: Tyrangiel: ‘People Don’t Read Brands Out of Obligation Anymore’

Media Beat is mediabistro.com’s interview series with the movers and shakers of the media world. View all past episodes at MediaBeat.com and follow Media Beat on Twitter.

Bloomberg BusinessWeek Editor: Compensating Writers Based on Pageviews Doesn’t Make Sense For Us

Josh Tyrangiel, editor of the new Bloomberg Businessweek, is eager to make a mark now that his publication is officially integrated into the Bloomberg family.

Tyrangiel was formerly managing editor at Time.com, so we asked him for his thoughts about some online publishers compensating writers based on pageviews and other social media metrics like Twitter followers.

“Just because you have a witty tweet…that’s not journalism,” he said. “I don’t want to reward people who go out of their way to make a scene…for [Gawker Media chief executive Nick] Denton and some other properties, it may make some sense, but for us it doesn’t.”

Watch the first installment of our Media Beat interview for more, including Tyrangiel’s story on how he got his first big break in the media industry, and why he thinks reports of a “culture clash” at Bloomberg Businessweek are “overstated.”

Part 2: Bloomberg Businessweek’s Tyrangiel on Business Reporting: “I’m Noticing…A Lot More Skepticism”

Part 3: Tyrangiel: ‘People Don’t Read Brands Out of Obligation Anymore’

Media Beat is mediabistro.com’s interview series with the movers and shakers of the media world. View all past episodes at MediaBeat.com and follow Media Beat on Twitter.

The Onion‘s Baratunde Thurston on the Key to Writing a Catchy Headline

Baratunde Thurston has been with The Onion for about two and half years and is currently the “fake news” publication’s Web and politics editor. In this episode of Media Beat, we asked him about the key to writing a catchy headline. “I thought I understood how it works,” said Thurston of the time before he joined the publication and was looking in from the outside.

“We start with the headlines,” he said, adding that every week hundreds of headlines come in from the company’s full time writers and part time contributors. “Then the story is written from that angle on, which makes writing news a lot easier, if you can start with the headline,” he said.

Of course, The Onion wants to make sure those headlines travel fast on all platforms. Case in point: Thurston told us that The Onion‘s iPhone app shot to No. 1 in the “news” category on Apple’s app store within 12 hours of being released.

We also asked him about the funniest example of when someone thought an Onion headline was real. Watch the video to find out the answer to that question and more.

PART 2: The Onion’s Baratunde Thurston On Why Media Pros Should Diversify

PART 3: Baratunde Thurston: ‘I Don’t Know that Media Companies Need to Be Saved

Media Beat is mediabistro.com’s interview series with the movers and shakers of the media world. View all past episodes at MediaBeat.com. Follow Media Beat on Twitter.

Media Beat: Lockhart Steele on Nick Denton: ‘I Loved Working For Him’

Gawker by day, blog network by…day. That was Curbed Network founder and president Lockhart Steele‘s schedule for at least a few years.

While spending his days as managing editor at Gawker, Steele got his own network up and running. “Everyone wastes time on the job in different ways; I guess my way of wasting time was blogging, for another blog,” he said.

His company includes the well-known blogs Curbed, Eater, Racked, and Gridskipper, along with local and national versions.

So what does Steele recall about working for Gawker Media founder Nick Denton? “Nick has a certain public persona, where people sort of see him as this dark overlord. In fact he’s an incredibly creative guy, who tends to see Web trends coming faster than most people…For all of his public posturing or public imaging as the sort of gooney man of the blog world, he’s obviously the reason we’re all here in a lot of ways.”

And what does he think about the site in its present day form? “Gawker’s purview now is a little bit wider.”

Watch the first installment of our interview to get more of Lockhart’s take on Gawker and learn how he built up Curbed Network from a “hobby” to a full-fledged business.

Part 2: Curbed Network Founder Lockhart Steele: ‘We Look For Niches Where We Can Be A Little Bit Weird’
Part 3: Lockhart Steele: ‘I Don’t Know Anyone in the New Media Space…That Has an iPad Strategy’

Media Beat is mediabistro.com’s interview series with the movers and shakers of the media world. View all past episodes at MediaBeat.com.

David Carr on NY Times Metered System: ‘This Time We’re All Going To Hold Hands’

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We caught up with New York Times Media Equation columnist David Carr after a panel he spoke on, titled, “Media Armageddon: What Happens When The New York Times Dies.”

While Carr joked on Twitter that he would serve as the “mainstream media pinata” on the panel, he held his own, and said, “I didn’t really feel defensive up there. I feel that we’re a target because we’re synonymous with serious reporting.”

“I do think that we can do a better job telling our story,” he said, and then mentioned how the recent hiring of Dow Jones PR head Bob Christie could change that.

We asked Carr what he thought about potentially having his content as part of the upcoming metered system, where readers will have to pay for the Times‘ online content after viewing a certain amount of stories.

“This time we’re all going to hold hands behind what I think is a very judicious, metered approach, 15, 20 hits…10 hits,” he said, referring to the Times‘ last online pay model, Times Select, where only a select few writers were part of the paid content system.

“I think it’s a way to turn towards our most passionate users, and say, are you willing to pay a convenience charge?” he said.

Carr then went on to joke, “They don’t consult me, and if they do they listen to what I say, they go the other way as fast as the can.”

Ricky Van Veen on New Production Company: ‘We Know How to Get the Web Excited’

Mediabistro caught up with Notional CEO Ricky Van Veen at the launch party for the company last night at the IAC building. Van Veen — co-founder and former editor-in-chief of CollegeHumor.com — told us Notional “is a television and web production company with the DNA of an Internet company.” The company’s initial block of programming includes content from the Food Network and HGTV.

Notional has a focus on “scalable” content, including game shows. Said Van Veen, “We want to do scripted, we want to do comedy, but the potential for that, in terms of scalability, is a lot less.”

As of now, Notional is focusing on the Web and TV, but Van Veen hinted that the company will look to do more in mobile and other platforms. “We know how to get the web excited, to make it go to the top of Digg,” he said. Notional is also collaborating with former co-chairman of NBC Entertainment Ben Silverman, who will also soon be launching the programming lineup for his own IAC funded production company. “We’ve got some good stuff in the works,” Van Veen said of the collaboration.

Related: More On Ben Silverman’s New Project