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Mona Zhang

Mona is the editor of SocialTimes and social media coordinator at Mediabistro. She graduated from New York University with a degree in journalism and East Asian Studies. Before moving to NYC, she lived in Beijing, London, Madrid and Chicago.

AOL CEO: At Least People Know The Name of Our Company

What do you think of when you hear the name “AOL”? Dialup? Your parents’ email? Alas, this is AOL’s brand problem. But don’t worry! At least people have heard of it!

That was AOL CEO Tim Armstrong‘s message at today’s Media Minds breakfast, where he said, “It’s incredibly expensive to implant a chip in someone’s head so they know what the name of your company is.” He shared that, up until 2006, AOL had spent $22 billion on marketing. As a result, “almost every country I go to in the world, people know AOL,” said Armstrong.

“We’re going to invest in things from a brand standpoint that human beings love. AOL is already planted in your head and [we'll] back fill it with awesome things — you’re going to love AOL again.”

Readers: Could you love AOL again? Did you ever love AOL?

Our sister site 10,000 Words has more on the event.

Get Your Kid Stories Published in Parents

The tagline of “Healthy kids, happy families” encompasses both Parents‘ content and attitude. The magazine is primarily a service magazine, and editors deliver what readers initially come to the magazine for: information about children’s health, safety, nutrition, discipline and development. However, editors also want to help readers enjoy family life (not escape it), delivering positive stories about keeping a marriage happy and celebrating the holidays.

Parents has “a nice balance between the content related to children and content related to being a parent,” said deputy editor Diane DebrovnerAnd, lucky for writers, almost every section of this service pub is open to freelance pitches, and there are numerous ways for newbies to break into the book. 

Get all the details in How To Pitch: Parents.

ag_logo_medium.gifThe full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Get Your Kid Stories Published in Parents

The tagline of “Healthy kids, happy families” encompasses both Parents‘ content and attitude. The magazine is primarily a service magazine, and editors deliver what readers initially come to the magazine for: information about children’s health, safety, nutrition, discipline and development. However, editors also want to help readers enjoy family life (not escape it), delivering positive stories about keeping a marriage happy and celebrating the holidays.

Parents has “a nice balance between the content related to children and content related to being a parent,” said deputy editor Diane DebrovnerAnd, lucky for writers, almost every section of this service pub is open to freelance pitches, and there are numerous ways for newbies to break into the book. 

Get all the details in How To Pitch: Parents.

ag_logo_medium.gifThe full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Write for Working Mother, Land $1 Per Word (and Up!)

Unlike most parenting magazines, Working Mother focuses on moms instead of kids. The service mag aims to help moms throughout a busy work day, and there are plenty of opportunities for freelancers to break in. The feature well is especially friendly, and a well tailored pitch could land your byline in one of the columns, too.

“Our readers are striving to find work-life satisfaction. They’re a driven bunch who are juggling not only work and children, but often aging parents, pets, you name it,” said editorial director Jennifer Owens. “They’re also highly social, communicating with us directly through LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest and Instagram.”

Think you’ve got an idea that might work for their readers? Get details on who and what to pitch in How To Pitch: Working Mother.

ag_logo_medium.gifThe full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Write for Working Mother, Land $1 Per Word (and Up!)

Unlike most parenting magazines, Working Mother focuses on moms instead of kids. The service mag aims to help moms throughout a busy work day, and there are plenty of opportunities for freelancers to break in. The feature well is especially friendly, and a well tailored pitch could land your byline in one of the columns, too.

“Our readers are striving to find work-life satisfaction. They’re a driven bunch who are juggling not only work and children, but often aging parents, pets, you name it,” said editorial director Jennifer Owens. “They’re also highly social, communicating with us directly through LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest and Instagram.”

Think you’ve got an idea that might work for their readers? Get details on who and what to pitch in How To Pitch: Working Mother.

ag_logo_medium.gifThe full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Pitch Timely New York Stories to JET

Launched back in 1951, JET has been the authority on news in the black community for decades. With a loyal readership of over 7 million, freelancers with the right pitch will get prime real estate for their bylines.

Since the pub is largely news based, editors are looking for local stories from stringers who live in different parts of the country and can report on influential, headline-making topics in their own areas. They want to hear about news-making trends, like the outbreak of bigotry among fans at high school sporting events. So if you spot a breaking topic, pitch it with a vision for what the story will look like. “I’m always on the lookout for new trends at both the regional and national level,” said editor-in-chief Mitzi Miller.

For more, read How To Pitch: JET.

ag_logo_medium.gifThe full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Pitch Timely L.A. Stories to JET

Launched back in 1951, JET has been the authority on news in the black community for decades. With a loyal readership of over 7 million, freelancers with the right pitch will get prime real estate for their bylines.

Since the pub is largely news based, editors are looking for local stories from stringers who live in different parts of the country and can report on influential, headline-making topics in their own areas. They want to hear about news-making trends, like the outbreak of bigotry among fans at high school sporting events. So if you spot a breaking topic, pitch it with a vision for what the story will look like. “I’m always on the lookout for new trends at both the regional and national level,” said editor-in-chief Mitzi Miller.

For more, read How To Pitch: JET.

ag_logo_medium.gifThe full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Jess Cagle on Changes at Time Inc. and EW

“No one here is concerned that the print magazine is going away,” said Entertainment Weekly managing editor Jess Cagle when asked about Time Inc.’s impending spin-off from its parent company. “The print magazine is still the spine of our brand.”

In the latest installment of Mediabistro’s So What Do You Do?, Cagle also discussed what he’s doing to keep the established brand fresh (forays into TV and radio), digital vs. print and why you won’t see “sponsored” content in the mag’s pages.

“Obviously, print advertising is a challenge, but there’s not a lot of overlap between our print audience and our digital audience,” he said. “The print audience has held really steady the last few years. It’s about 1.7 million. They haven’t left for the digital space; our audience has just grown because of digital. The magazine’s audience is something like 11 million, and the overall audience is around 18 million.”

Read the full interview in So What Do You Do, Jess Cagle, Managing Editor of Entertainment Weekly?

Jess Cagle on Taking Entertainment Weekly to TV and Radio

How do you keep an established brand on its feet? For Entertainment Weekly managing editor Jess Cagle, it means launching a radio channel and a reality series. However, just because the mag is making forays into other media (not to mention EW.com’s 7 million-plus monthly uniques), doesn’t mean print is on the decline.

“The print magazine is still the spine of our brand,” Cagle told FishbowlLA’s  Richard Horgan in the latest installment of Mediabistro’s So What Do You Do?. In the interview, he reveals why the magazine won’t be doing sponsored content any time soon, what makes their online community engaging and intelligent and what freelancers can do to get in his good books. Here’s an excerpt:

EW doesn’t use freelancers much, but what is your advice to anyone seeking to pitch a story to the magazine, or website?

We’ll use freelancers to cover events and things like that, but what I would say to any freelancer is that everybody today has an opinion, and we don’t need your opinion. All we need is news. So come with a great bit of access to something that we can’t get ourselves. For that, I’ll write a check, immediately.

Read the full interview in So What Do You Do, Jess Cagle, Managing Editor of Entertainment Weekly?

Morning Media Newsfeed: Newsweek for Sale | News Corp Cuts Coming | De Rosa Joins Circa


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IAC Seeking Buyers for Newsweek (Variety)
Newsweek appears to be on the block — again. According to sources who have been briefed, IAC is sending out inquiries to prospective buyers who may be interested in purchasing the 80-year-old title, which ended weekly publication of its domestic edition late last year in favor of a digital-only format. A revamped Newsweek.com launched earlier this month. Adweek At this point, Newsweek’s decline and predicted demise are well-trod ground. The once-venerable Newsweek used to have a circulation topping 3 million, but had fallen to less than half of that when it went digital-only this year. The move would save IAC money and enable Newsweek to make good on the copies it owed subscribers (Newsweek carried a $30 million circulation liability), but no one in their right mind expected a paid, digital magazine to be a viable option. Politico / Dylan Byers on Media In April, Diller said he regretted buying the magazine. “‘I wish I hadn’t bought Newsweek, it was a mistake,” he told Bloomberg TV. He also said he did not have “great expectations” for the digital version, which, like The Daily Beast, is edited by Tina Brown. Read more

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