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Books

Revisiting Truman Capote’s Tipsy High Times Cover

The arrival of a new book about the colorful 40-year-history of High Times magazine is refocusing attention on some of the publication’s most memorable covers.

Tommy Chong, who holds the record for most High Times cover appearances over the years (by a human) at eight, started that run in April 1980 with partner Cheech Marin. The pair were shown reading copies of Fortune and Money.

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Then there’s the December 1978 cover featuring Truman Capote and Andy Warhol, to go along with some crazy, pot-rewritten Christmas carols. As the Warhol Museum recently reminded, the plan was initially for something a little different:

Their photo shoot took place on September 26, 1978, and is detailed in Warhol’s entry that day in his book The Andy Warhol Diaries. As he recounted later that day: “[Toni, from High Times] had a Santa costume for me and a little girl outfit for Truman. But Truman wasn’t in the mood to go into drag, he said that he was already dressed like a little boy. Truman was really drunk, hugging around.”

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Mick Rock Readying Another David Bowie Book

MickRockExposedCoverThe exhibit of photographs by famed music scene chronicler Mick Rock at the Sumo Gallery in Tribeca ends Sunday. But have no fear, Rock and rock fans. Per a Q&A with The Observer‘s Matthew Kassel, more is on the way.

The exhibited photos were culled from Rock’s recent book Exposed, out this month in paperback. As the British-born photog explains, one of the pictures – featuring David Bowie looking at himself in a mirror – launched a professional relationship that is still thriving:

“That was very early on in his career, for this men’s magazine called Club International. When David saw the picture, he said, “Mick sees me like I see myself,” and that was really the shoot that cemented our relationship. We’re doing another Ziggy Stardust book — half of it previously unseen photos — which is coming out this spring.”

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Reporter Reads About Himself in Alan Cumming’s New Book

AlanCummingBookCoverPresently, Tim Teeman writes for The Daily Beast. But back in 2010, his byline could be found in The London Times, and it was during that time that had a very large impact on actor Alan Cumming‘s life.

As Teeman discovered and recounted this week for The Daily Beast:

Journalists generally shouldn’t be part of the stories they cover. But today, sitting with Alan Cumming in the Union Square vegan restaurant Peacefood Café, it’s unavoidable. I am part of the story, a key one, it turns out; when I reached page 31 of The Good Wife star’s memoir, Not My Father’s Son, the color drained from my face when I discovered why.

“Isn’t it funny? You’re actually integral to this book,” Cumming says, taking off his lovely, fitted checkered coat and scarf and liberating a curtain of dark floppy hair from under a jaunty hat. “If it hadn’t been for us meeting and doing that interview my dad would never have told me — at that time anyway… and maybe not ever.”

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The Road to a Definitive Bob Hope Biography

HopeBioCoverWith advance praise from Tom Brokaw, Dick Cavett, Woody Allen and a hardcover release date of November 4, Hope: Entertainer of the Century seems sure to be one of the holiday season’s most discussed non-fiction offerings.

The author is Time vet and the magazine’s current theater critic, Richard Zoglin. He tells Stay Thirsty Media that the project grew out of both a personal fascination with Hope growing up and research connected to his previous book, Comedy at the Edge, about 1970s stand-up comedy. He’s also pretty sure Hope would not approve:

“Capturing Hope’s essence was the hardest part, because he was such a closed-off guy, difficult for even his closest friends to know. I did my best.”

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Amy Poehler High School English Teacher Event Quickly Sells Out

YesPleaseCoverIt didn’t take long for tickets to disappear for the most unusual portion of Amy Poehler‘s upcoming book tour. On Wednesday, October 29 at the John Hancock Hall at the Back Bay Events Center in Boston, the actress will sit down with her former high school English teacher Kathy Dalton to talk about her book Yes Please. A day after tickets went on sale, the event is SRO:

While originally a transplant from upstate New York, Dalton spent most of her career teaching English in Burlington, Massachusetts. In September of 1983, a bright, enthusiastic and extremely inquisitive 14-year-old named Amy Poehler entered Ms. Dalton’s freshman class, and thus began their four year literary journey together. Although, it didn’t take long for Ms. Dalton to recognize that Amy’s own creative journey was just beginning, she never envisioned how far it would take her. Bravo, Amy!

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A Travis Bickle Contact Sheet

There are several reasons why the portion of Hollywood Frame by Frame dedicated to Martin Scorcese‘s 1976 drama Taxi Driver jumps out.

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1) The featured contact sheet is the work of famed photog Steve Schapiro.

2) The 34 thumbnails abut Robert De Niro’s famous “You talkin’ to me?” speech which, as the New York Daily News was the first to reveal a few years ago, was inspired by some Bruce Springsteen concert patter.

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BU Journalism Prof Tops New York Times Bestsellers List

13HoursCoverMitchell Zuckoff is number one with a BU-llet. The Boston University journalism professor’s non-fiction tome 13 Hours, based on interviews with a half-dozen security personnel involved in the attack on the U.S. embassy in Benghazi, hit number one this weekend on the New York Times Non-Fiction Bestsellers list.

The proud prof and Pulitzer winner finalist spoke to Mina Corpuz, associate news editor of BU student newspaper The Daily Press. In the article, he receives praise from a pair of colleagues:

“Most of the professors continue to be practitioners,” journalism school chair William McKeen said in an email. “They love to teach, and they love to continue to report and write, make films, deliver commentary on politics, and in other ways remain in the game… One of the cool things about all this is that the guy with the No. 1 book on the non-fiction list is teaching our beginning journalism course this semester. That course assignment was his request…”

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Leslie Bennetts Inks Deal for Joan Rivers Biography

LeslieBennettsPicThe Little, Brown tome won’t be out until 2016. But that’s a sign that the publisher and Vanity Fair contributor Leslie Bennetts (pictured) are serious about doing their subject justice.

From Alexandra Alter‘s New York Times item:

In a statement announcing the acquisition, Judy Clain, editor-in-chief of Little, Brown, called Ms. Rivers “an icon and a role model to millions.”

Ms. Bennetts, who met Ms. Rivers several times but never interviewed her, said in a statement that she was drawn to the biography because “Rivers’ career was also enormously significant in American cultural history, breaking down barriers for women in television and comedy and continually redefining the acceptable boundaries of truth-telling for women in public life.”

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Keith Richards: ‘It’s Time to Make Grandpas Hip’

That’s one of the things children’s book author Keith Richards told Matt Lauer this morning on the Today show. The Rolling Stones guitarist’s tome Gus & Me, about the major formative influence played by grandfather “Gus,” is out today. The book is 32 pages long, with illustrations provided by Richards’ 29-year-old daughter Theodora.

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Massachusetts Dentist Unearths Lost Dr. Seuss Stories

HortonKwuggerbugCoverIn 2011, The Bippolo Seed and Other Lost Stories was a New York Times bestseller. The success of this book has also paved the way for a second tome of “lost” Dr. Seuss stories coming out Tuesday.

Horton and the Kwuggerbug and More Lost Stories features an introduction by Charles D. Cohen, a Massachusetts dentist and avid Seuss collector. He had been trying for many years to get some stories published, in book form, that Theodor Geisel wrote for Redbook in the early 1950s. One scholar tells U-T San Diego staff writer John Wilkens that these transitional efforts essentially demonstrate how “Seuss became Seuss.” From the article:

During his Seuss research, Cohen kept finding references to the early magazine stories and eventually tracked down about 30 different ones from Redbook and other publications. He’d buy copies of the original magazines, upgrade when he found some in better condition, and sell the duplicates on eBay.

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