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Adam Carolla’s Mangria Lands Esquire Review

Adam Carolla is a jack of all trades.

The former carpenter turned media and podcast giant is now diving into the world of alcohol with the release of Mangria, a spinoff of the popular sangria beverage that he concocted one night at home while searching for a way to get buzzed with whatever he could find in the house.

Matthew Kitchen of Esquire cracked open a bottle of the powerful drink (20.9 percent alcohol content) and shared his thoughts on Carolla’s latest endeavor:

At first whiff, Mangria smells like that sticky red punch that paints the corners of a child’s mouth a birthday party. To be honest, the taste isn’t much more masculine. Apparently the “Man” part comes from the alcohol content, which tops out at 20.9 percent, or about eight percent above what you get from your standard wine bottle.

Mangria calls itself a wine that boasts “aromas of plum, cherry, blackberry, orange, and citrus.” But it’s fooling absolutely no one. This is a stiff drink that goes down easy because it doesn’t taste much like alcohol. And therein lies the problem: It isn’t so much a way to unwind after work as it is the fastest road I’ve found to forgetting I have adult responsibilities. Fans sometimes refer to it as “college in a bottle.”

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CNBC Reporter Follows the Foie Gras to Reno

LA based CNBC reporter Jane Wells has quite the varied beat. She covers agriculture, defense, retail, California economic trends and, when the opportunity arises, Golden State “Funny Business.” It is under that last guise that she shared an update this week about a small business she profiled earlier this year.

Mirepoix USA, an online retailer based in the Bay Area, decamped to Reno, Nevada ahead of the 2012 California state ban on the sale of foie gras. This weekend, owner Laurel Pine welcomed several dozen west coast visitors for a special tasting event and told Wells what was good for the California goose has turned out to be even better for the Nevada gander:

“My sales have actually doubled,” Pine says, adding that all the publicity around the outlawing of foie gras drew attention to the product. Some long-time liver lovers stocked up, spending hundreds, sometimes thousands, of dollars. Others tried foie gras for the first time to see what the fuss was all about. “It’s actually increased interest in the product more than ever.”

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Science Reporter Ponders the Dynamics of Fishy Fresno Photo Opp

Is a local media event a little fishy when journalists outnumber the salmon 3-to-1? That was the question recently on the mind of Fresno Bee science reporter Mark Grossi.

Grossi notes that he hadn’t even thought about the comical imbalance at last week’s photo opp until someone else mentioned it. But sure enough, these fish were buttressed by a powerful PR current:

I saw the Associated Press, at least one television crew from San Francisco, local television stations and a host of other photographers. I saw only three fish. One of them was dead.

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Pepper Spray Incident Sparks Calls for Resignation of UC Davis Chancellor

Outraged by Friday’s violent crackdown by UC Davis police on peaceful student protestors, many are calling for the resignation of Chancellor Linda Katehi. An online petition begun by Assistant UCD Prof. Nathan Brown demanding the Chancellor’s immediate resignation currently has over 50,000 signatures.

The Chancellor, who ordered campus police to remove protestors, told CNN that she would not resign, and that she ordered the removal of student protestors out of concerns for their own safety. But she had little to say to the students who assembled outside a UC Davis press conference on Saturday. The Chancellor avoided leaving the building for over 2 hours because she felt threatened by the students outside. The video below shows Katehi walking to her car, through a path of silent, peaceful protestors.

UC Davis students are planning a protest rally on campus today at noon.

Would You Wear a Perez Hilton Pump?

You can add shoe designer to Perez Hilton‘s resume.

The celebrity blogger has designed two shoes for ShoeDazzle and their “Celebrity Shoe Design Program for Charity.”

According to the release, “Sparkle” is “a black faux suede pump with silver stud detailing on the heel, platform and dual ankle straps,” and “Shine” is “a casual unisex silver metallic sneaker with stud embellishments and zipper detailing.” Both shoes are available starting on Nov. 11 on ShoeDazzle.com

100 percent of the profits from the sale of his shoes will go to the Gay, Lesbian & Straight Education Network (GLSEN), which addresses LGBT issues in K-12 schools.

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Netflix Short One Million Subscribers

Netflix saw shares drop 14.5 percent today, after the company announced it was lowering estimated third quarter subscriber numbers by a million.

The news comes just two weeks after the rental giant effectively doubled subscription prices. That price hike occurred the same day cable network Starz announced that they would stop providing movie content to Netflix.

Consumers, it seems, don’t want to pay more for less.

Customer service seems to be taking a hit as well. As a Netflix subscriber, I was surprised that the company, which has never been shy about flooding inboxes, didn’t send me notice that they were raising service fees. If I didn’t read the news, the extra charges would have come as a complete shock.

Make that a million and one subscribers, Netflix.

Mythbusters’ Kari Byron on the Morning Media Menu

kari100.jpgToday’s guest on the mediabistro.com Morning Media Menu was Kari Byron, one of the co-hosts on the Discovery Channel show, Mythbusters.

Byron discussed her new show on The Science Channel, Head Rush, explaining how they would reach a generation of teenagers surrounded by distractions. She also talked about President Barack Obama‘s visit to the set and the possibility of more Mythbusters‘ books.

Press play to listen. The show was hosted by GalleyCat editor Jason Boog and TVNewser co-editor Alex Weprin. Music by Kevin MacLeod.

arrow_hp.jpgClick here to receive mediabistro.com’s Daily Newsfeed via email.

LA Times Responds To Teacher Suicide

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In its story on the suicide of fifth-grade Miramonte Elementary School teacher Rigoberto Ruelas, the LA Times responded to the accusations from teachers union President A.J. Duffy and Ruelas’ family, that the Times’ publishing of “value-added” teacher test scores contributed to Ruelas’ death.

The Times said it extends “our sympathy to his family, students, friends and colleagues,” Nancy Sullivan, Times vice-president of communications, said in a statement. The newspaper published the database, she said, “because it bears directly on the performance of public employees who provide an important service, and in the belief that parents and the public have a right to judge the data for themselves.”

Meanwhile, LA Weekly news editor Jill Stewart thinks that the “pipsqueak, anti-reform, craven, do-nothing, sad-sack” Duffy should resign over his handling of the suicide.

Previously on FBLA: LA Times Implicated in Teacher Suicide

LA Times Implicated in Teacher Suicide

A South Gate teacher at Miramonte Elementary School who had been missing for several days was found dead over the weekend after committing suicide. Friends and family say the recent teacher evaluation report published in the LA Times may have played a role.

“He kept saying that there’s stress at work,” Ruelas’ brother, Alejandro told KABC.

The Times’ “value-added” rating suggested Ruelas was slightly “less effective” than average as a teacher.

“UTLA is outraged at the Los Angeles Times,” United Teachers Los Angeles president A.J. Duffy said in a statement. “We predicted there would be problems.”

Wow, a little early to start politicizing the suicide of one of your own, no? The autopsy hasn’t even been concluded.

“We understand that the sheriff’s department is currently investigating Mr. Ruelas death. We extend our sympathy to his family,” a Times spokesperson told KABC in response to Duffy’s statement.

LA Unified Teachers Protest the LA Times

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The controversy surrounding the LA Times’ decision to publish an online database of teachers’ effectiveness isn’t going away any time soon. Yesterday, hundreds of teachers from the LA Unified School District gathered outside the Times’ downtown headquarters in protest.

“I feel, in a way, betrayed,” Lee Bartoletti of Ivanhoe Elementary School in Silver Lake told a Times reporter. “The Times has reneged on its mission of telling the truth.”

The protest was organized by the union United Teachers Los Angeles, which has also called for a boycott of the paper. The UTLA website didn’t have much to say on the matter, posting only a sentence or two about the protest.

“Members give the L.A. Times a consistent grade: F.”

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