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International

Photographer Recalls Tiananmen Square ‘Tank Man’ Moment

StuartFranklinPicWhen Stuart Franklin (pictured), from a distance, started snapping on June 5, 1989 pictures of a man standing in protest in front of a tank in Tiananmen Square, he had no idea the image would become so iconic. In his Guardian remembrance of that moment, he suggests that TV coverage of the overall events and that individual’s slow boil were equally responsible for the image’s impact.

In the Franklin essay, there is also an important lesson for all current and future international-conflict stringers and journalists: ignore those First World stomach pangs! Unlike many colleagues, Franklin – on assignment for Time magazine via agency Magnum Photos – and his Newsweek cohort Charlie Cole had stayed put at a nearby hotel. Even though they were confined to the structure on June 5 by Chinese military, they were still able to make photojournalism history from a room balcony:

The majority of journalists were not there to witness the scene; lots had moved to another hotel and missed the ‘tank man’ moment. Most of them started at the Beijing Hotel, but the food wasn’t great. Another place nearer the airport did hamburgers, so they had decamped and got stuck outside the city by blockades at the point of the crackdown.

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Pakistani Series Burka Avenger Claims Another U.S. Media Award

51f606f95d3be.JPGMaking Time‘s list of “The 11 Most Influential Fictional Characters of 2013” – alongside the likes of Ron Burgundy, Carlos Danger and Walter White – was sweet. But this week, following a 20-hour flight into New York, musician and producer Haroon got to accept something much sweeter on behalf of his 3D female-empowerment animated program: a Peabody award.

From a report on Pakistan Today:

“It’s an incredible honor,” said Haroon during an interview immediately after the Peabody presentation. “It’s a great feeling to be recognized.”

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Actually, Starbucks DOES Know How to Spell Colombia

ColombiaFacebookPicFor today’s example of a journalist linking to an article without fully reading that article, we turn to Boston-based GlobalPost blogger Timothy McGrath. Halfway down McGrath’s dishonor roll of celebrities, companies and media outlets that have recently and erroneously trumpeted the country of Colombia as “Columbia,” he calls out Starbucks.

However, had McGrath properly read Wall Street Journal Bogota-based reporter Dan Molinski‘s piece about the social media movement spearheaded in February 2013 by Colombian digital media executive Carlos Pardo, he would have realized that Starbucks is in this case not to blame:

The movement can take its nagging too far. When a television show about plans Starbucks has to come to Colombia [in 2014] misspelled the country, many here quickly blamed Starbucks itself. Hundreds of Colombians, with national pride on display, used it as a rallying cry to urge the company to stay away.

Starbucks said it wasn’t to blame. “Our 42-year heritage with Colombian coffee farmers dates back to Starbucks’ 1971 founding. We definitely know the difference between Colombia and Columbia,” the Seattle company said in a statement.

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A Google Search Tells the Female Foreign Correspondent Story

FridaGhitisTwitterProfilePicFascinating. At one point in this CNN.com opinion piece about the death of Afghanistan-stationed AP photographer Anja Niedringhaus and the importance of women on the front lines of journalism, Miami Herald world affairs columnist Frida Ghitis (pictured) very effectively proves her point:

Now that the US is about to leave Afghanistan, the prospect that hard-won gains will be reversed creates enormous fears for Afghan women. To see how this is covered, I Googled three words: “Afghan Women Fear.” The first six news stories on the subject were all written by women.

Ghitis includes links to all of those stories. They were written by Margherita Stancati (WSJ), Emma Graham-Harrison/Mokhtar Amiri (The Guardian), Sharon Behn (Voice of America), Cid Standifer (Stars and Stripes), Alice Speri (Vice News) and Homa Khaleeli (The Guardian).

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Instagram Leads New Zealand Teen to Ford Models

MaiaCottonAuckland agency 62 Models has sparked the beginnings of a possibly remarkable Down Under saga.

Per a report by Fairfax NZ News, agency booker Andrea Plowright spotted a photo of 15-year-old Kiwi teen Maia Cotton (pictured) on Instagram. Cotton flew from the countryside to Auckland a few weeks ago, a new photo was posted on the agency’s Instagram account and, voila!:

“We just placed a digi taken on my iPhone of Maia and the reaction towards it was incredible,” Plowright said. “She’s amazing, she’s going to be big…”

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Another Year, Another Staged China Prime Minister Press Conference

NTYSinosphereLogoEvery March in the Great Hall of the People near Tiananmen Square in Beijing, a live-TV press conference with the Prime Minister of China caps an annual conference known as the National People’s Congress. And as New York Times Beijing bureau reporter Andrew Jacobs notes, every year it’s the same bogus drill:

But unbeknownst to many people in China, all the questions had been vetted in advance, with foreign reporters and Foreign Ministry officials having negotiated over what topics were permissible, and then how the acceptable questions would be phrased.

This year CNN, Reuters, CNBC, The Associated Press and the Financial Times were among the outlets permitted to ask questions. Most of those who covered the event agreed it was a lackluster affair, without even a nugget of bona fide news.

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UK Journo: NYT Op-Ed Errors, Ironies ‘Too Numerous to Detail’

The March 8 New York Times op-ed, headlined “London’s Laundry Business,” was contributed by Ben Judah, author of last year’s Fragile Empire: How Russia Fell In and Out of Love With Vladimir Putin. The piece did not sit well with another author, Sean Thomas, who writes thrillers under the pseudonym Tom Knox and is currently working on a memoir.

LondonShardThomas, responding over the weekend in London’s Daily Telegraph, has some laundry business of his own to share – namely, a laundry list of Judah mistakes and false arguments. Right from the NYT opening paragraph:

The essay begins with a series of bizarre inaccuracies and insults – “London’s buses are still dirty” (no they aren’t), “Londoners are passive-aggressive” (no they’re not), “London’s planning regulations have been scrapped,” (no they haven’t). Then we get to the nub of Judah’s argument. He’s hacked off that we aren’t supporting America’s vigorous stance against Putin.

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Uprooted New York Family Editor Gradually Adapting to Londontown

Eighteen years in Canada; eighteen years in New York City. Who knows how long in London?

MeiraDrazinPicFor the Jewish Chronicle, former New York Family editor Meira Drazin has written an engaging account of her first months living in northwest London. The mother of three, with very mixed feelings, recently moved to the UK because of her husband’s exciting, faraway new job.

At various points, the UK GPS lady has been Drazin’s enemy and her kids’ reassuring friend. Drazin also makes a good point about how facile and uninformed all those “great adventure” well-wishers on Facebook and elsewhere have proven to be:

I felt like the people who said they were jealous failed to acknowledge the difficulties: the massive production of shifting a family of five across the ocean, finding somewhere to live and setting up a home, getting places for the children in schools, dealing with their emotional adjustment, even grocery shop. We are certainly not the first family to move a great distance, but I resented what I saw as a blindness to the fact that while my husband would go off to work every day, I would be left by myself to—literally—navigate my family’s new life.

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BuzzFeed’s Next Bureau Will Be in Berlin

BuzzFeedLogoAs tipped by Jonah Peretti via Medium and more specifically confirmed this afternoon by New York Business Journal reporter Ben Fischer, the next BuzzFeed bureau will be in Berlin. This will be the ninth such outpost for the website, including NYC headquarters.

There have been some domestic pleas on Twitter today in reaction to the Peretti memo for more presence in U.S. cities like Houston and New Orleans. But the truth is, while BuzzFeed may not have bureau-boots on the ground there and elsewhere, its contributors and writers cover a geographical web that stretches far beyond the company’s official bricks-and-mortar locations.

Peretti added in his memo that Tokyo, Mexico City and Mumbai will follow Berlin in some order. Fischer notes that these are, respectively, the world’s first, third and fifth largest metropolitan areas.

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Australia Reacts to NYT ‘Hipster Heaven’ Designation

The most popular Yankee in Perth, Australia today is City University of New York associate professor Baz Dreisinger. And that popularity is only going to increase through the weekend as her NYT travel article, online under the headline “Catching Perth’s Wave in Western Australia,” winds its way to Sunday’s print editions beneath the alternate page TR6 moniker “Perth Finds a Place in the Sun.”

NYTPerthAUMapDreisinger’s piece is the kind that makes you want to surf to an airfare finder website right now. It’s also the kind of travel article that generates its own press, including a proud proclamation in The Australian newspaper that “New York Knows WA is ‘Hipster Heaven’“:

Writer Dreisinger waxes lyrical about the city’s assets, from the “futuristic” Perth Arena to its endless stretch of blue sky days in summer and “hipster” urban villages such as Northbridge and Mt Lawley.

Dreisinger declares the city to be “hipster heaven” – insisting Brooklyn’s trendy Williamsburg “pales beside Perth.”

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