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iPad

Awl Spoof Inspires Ex-Journo to Teach Dogs How to Use iPads

The above headline is not a joke, even though The Awl article that inspired it was.

Kelly Faircloth, picking up on her earlier BetaBeat item and a report this week by The Today Showexplains that once-upon-a-time New York Observer colleague Anna Jane Grossman is currently involved with a business that teaches dogs how to use iPads, so that these pampered canines can more effectively engage with their owners. And that’s not the funniest part.

As Today revealed, Grossman got the iPad learning idea from a January 2011 spoof (pictured) written for The Awl by David Parker. Gag article, meet real-life spin off.

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Magazines’ iPad Editions See 24 Percent Jump in Ads

Magazines might finally be getting advertisers to accept the conundrum that is the iPad. According to Ad Age, the number of ad units in magazines’ iPad editions jumped almost 24 percent (23.6) during the first quarter this year, compared to 2012.

The 58 magazines that were analyzed by Kantar Media and PIB saw print ads flat in Q1, but iPad ads rose; jumping from 4,824 in the first quarter of last year to 5,961 this year. The same report found that ad pages and ad units combined were up 7.5 percent.

While 4,824 ad units isn’t a lot to begin with, the bump is notable because it shows that there has been some progress. It remains to be seen, however, if that progress is happening fast enough.

New York Takes ‘All in One’ Approach to New iPad App

New York’s new iPad app — complete with a subscription option — debuts on Monday. What is worth noting is its streaming integration of NYMag.com content, combined with the magazine’s pieces, all in one place.

At the top of the app is a regularly updated feed of digital content. That feed is refreshed with about 20 of the site’s best posts and breaking news each day. That content is free to anyone who downloads the app. If you want to access the print content, you simply swipe the app and they appear. New York calls this its “window pane” feature. Print subscribers can access the magazine pieces for free, while everyone else will be prompted to purchase a digital subscription.

While all of New York’s content can be found at the magazine’s web site, the app’s updating feed feature sitting alongside everything the magazine has to offer might tempt people to step away from the laptop, and pick up their iPad.

The Atlantic Wire Launches Web App

The Atlantic Wire has a new look. On the iPad, at least. The site has launched a new HTML5 web app — touch.theatlanticwire.com — that is specifically designed for the Apple tablet.

The Atlantic Wire decided to venture into iPad web apps because its audience increasingly comes via iPads and other tablets. According to internal stats, from 2011 to 2012, the number of readers visiting The Atlantic Wire via a tablet increased by 210 percent.

“As we see increased tablet adoption rates among our readers, we are actively experimenting with technologies that help us create great experiences in a media landscape with more and more choice,” said Kimberly Lau, vice president and general manager for Atlantic Digital, in a statement. “We believe the future of digital publishing will require a multiple-platform, multiple-product strategy where users can access Atlantic content whenever and however they want it.”

If you’re an iPad user, give the new app a try. When the New York Times launched their HTML5 based web app for the iPad, we loved it. It provides a slicker experience than the typical app.

Condé Kills Gourmet Live App

Gourmet the magazine has been dead since 2009, and now, the Gourmet Live app is joining it. The New York Post reports that Condé Nast has decided to kill Gourmet Live because — after some initial enthusiasm for the app — no one was using it.

The app was launched in 2010, and at the time was heralded as a unique way to increase Gourmet’s brand presence. But as many media companies find out, getting people to stay interested in apps is harder than it seems. Just ask anyone who downloaded Angry Birds.

Condé spun the death of Gourmet Live by telling the Post that it wasn’t needed anymore because Gourmet.com was doing so great. “Gourmet Live, while the absolute right move for its time, no longer helps fuel the brand’s evolution as the growth around the brand’s Web presence on Gourmet.com has greatly exceeded that of the Gourmet Live app,” said a spokesperson.

The Hollywood Reporter Updates iPad App

Everyone likes new things, right? Well, at least for the first couple days. Then new things become old and we’re bored with them again. For those who enjoy The Hollywood Reporter on their iPad, they have something new to enjoy. For now!

The magazine has revamped their app to include “all of the print magazine’s leading coverage of the entertainment industry in addition to app-only features such as a breaking news feed and user engagement on almost every page.”

THR has also made the app enticing to advertisers. ”Advertisers in the magazine who run 1/3 of a page or more will automatically have their ads run on the iPad platform for free,” Lynne Segall, publisher and senior vice president of THR, explained.

THR’s app is free through January 9, and new issues show up every Thursday via Apple’s subscription system.

 

Adweek Launches iPad App

Adweek has come to the iPad. The magazine’s app is powered by Adobe and comes equipped with all the content found in the print version, plus interactive features, expanded photo galleries, the “Ad of The Week,” and more.

Robert Newman, a creative director who oversaw the launch of Reader’s Digest’s iPad app, lent a helping hand to Nick Mrozowski and Lisa Granatstein, Adweek’s creative director and managing director, respectively.

“We had a top notch team working to seamlessly extend and enhance the experience of Adweek onto the iPad.” said Jim Cooper, executive editor of Adweek, in a statement. “This reinvention allows us to evolve at pace with the media we cover.”

The app is slick, but costly. Non-subscribers can enjoy it for $79.99 per year, $7.99 per month, or $4.99 per individual issue. You can also drop $99.99 per year for a print subscription, which includes access to the app.

David Ho on The Daily and Creating WSJ‘s iPad App

“Technology is easy. Journalism is hard,” says the Wall Street Journal‘s mobile and tablets editor David Ho. The Journal was one of the first major newspapers to develop an iPad app, the process of which was the toughest professional challenge Ho has undertaken. “It was more than a news-journalism-tech challenge. It felt like some crazy endurance race,” he said.

And, having gone through that process of creating a news app from scratch, Ho said he empathizes with the pressure his peers at News Corp.’s The Daily likely face.

“I think everyone involved in tablet and mobile news watches The Daily. It’s this bold experiment: a brand new news organization created from scratch. How often do you see that these days? The Daily pioneered a lot of ways to deliver news on tablets,” Ho said in Mediabistro’s latest So What Do You Do? interview.

“It does look like The Daily is trying to make their production process easier,” he continued. “They dropped their landscape view not long ago. That I get. Supporting two tablet rotations all the time is a lot of work. It’s tough to put out a tablet issue every day.”

Read more in So What Do You Do, David Ho, Mobile and Tablets Editor at The Wall Street Journal?

The New York Times’ New iPad Website Could Mean End of Apple App

The New York Times has launched an HTML 5 web app (app.nytimes.com) for the iPad. The app is available to subscribers and organizes content in four ways: Times Wire, a live feed of the latest news and media; All Sections, which is pretty self-explanatory; Trending, a collection of the hottest Times articles on Twitter; and Today’s Paper, an assortment of the day’s offerings, just like they appear in print.

By providing a way to get the Times on the iPad other than the Times’ app, it’s worth wondering if this is step one in the paper’s plan to abandon its iOS app completely. The Times has to pay Apple a whopping 30 percent of its app earnings for using Apple’s subscription service, so directing readers to a web app would cut that cost out.

Denise Warren, senior vice president and chief advertising officer for The New York Times Media Group, said in a statement that “We are working constantly to develop new products that distribute our content in innovative ways, and this web-based app is just one example of that.”

We’ll see if it’s also an example of the Times dodging Apple’s fees.

Fortune Changes iPad App, Shifts Plan

Fortune’s iPad app used to open up to a storefront image, asking users to pay before viewing any content. That’s the way plenty of magazine apps function, but Fortune has now shifted gears. The new Fortune iPad app weaves both free and pay-to-view content together in order to keep readers browsing, and maybe even lure some non-subscribers to pay up.

“Beginning with the current issue, iPad users can experience Fortune soup-to-nuts on their tablets,” said Fortune.com’s managing editor, Megan Barnettin a statement. “The magazine content is interspersed with daily news and analysis in an easy-to-swipe news app. It’s the best of Fortune in a mix of free and paid content.”

Mixing the content is a smart move by Fortune. There are plenty of people who have a magazine app, but for whatever reason, have decided not to become a subscriber. By offering free items along with the tempting subscriber-only content, Fortune is getting those people to give the app another try.

New subscribers to Fortune magazine receive one month free on the iPad app. Otherwise the pricing is one month for $2.99, one year for $19.99 or a single issue for $4.99.

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