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How Elle’s Joe Zee Broke Into Fashion (and How You Can Too)


In his over 20 years in the fashion business, Elle creative director Joe Zee has worked for such titles as Details and Allure and styled advertising campaigns for companies like Gap and DKNY. And, in our Media Beat interview, the Toronto native and star of Sundance Channel’s All On the Line with Joe Zee was very clear about how he got to the top.

One: he worked for people he could learn from, namely legendary fashion stylist and editor Polly Mellen. (“She taught me what it was like to have a passion for something.”)

And, two, he worked his butt off. “I won’t put stock in people who tell me they wanna work in fashion, because they wanna be glamorous. They wanna be famous. They wanna be well known,” he said. “If you wanna be those things, wrong business.”

Part 1: Elle‘s Joe Zee Puts It All on the Line for Sundance Channel
Part 2: Elle‘s Joe Zee Reveals Exactly What a Magazine Creative Director Does

7 Tips for Hiring the Best Candidate for the Job

One benefit of today’s down economy is that those with the resources for new hires have even more talent to choose from.  Yet, as a manager, you have to know how to dig a little deeper to find the person who’s really the best fit for the position.

For starters, use the interview to glean info that isn’t on the resume. And an easy way to do this to ask about what happened between jobs. ”Find out why the person changed roles or employers. If a transition doesn’t make sense, then probe more deeply,” said Caroline McClure, principal at recruiting consultant ScoutRock. That information is sure to be more useful than a canned response about previous job duties.

Get six more tips for maximizing an interview in 7 Job Interview Tips for Employers. [subscription required]

5 Signs You Should Quit Your Job

With all the upheaval in the media industry as of late, companies are being forced to slim down and stretch further. Working at a leaner organization isn’t a bad thing, but sometimes there are signs that your talents would be better off elsewhere. How can you tell that the company is really in trouble, and not just experiencing some ups and downs that go along with the industry?

“If you’re worried about layoffs, it’s a good idea to begin on an exit strategy,” advised veteran HR consultant Mary Hladio in Mediabistro’s latest AvantGuild feature. If you see signs that the company is in trouble, like multiple restructures or missed financial projections, it might be a good idea to look for greener pastures.

To read more, check out 5 Signs It’s Time to Leave Your Job. [Mediabistro AvantGuild subscription required]

5 Traits Every Good Magazine Editor Has

For many journalism junkies, there are few things more honorable than landing a spot on the masthead. However, being an editor requires much more than just a love for media or a knack for grammar. For one, you need to be able to multitask and manage the various projects and personalities of the staff.

“When you’re a writer, it’s a very singular experience,” said Jayson Rodriguez, a writer-turned-editor of XXL. “But here, I’m in touch with the art team; I’m in touch with the research department; I’m trying to make sure things can align on the front end as fast as they can so they have appropriate time on the back end. I’m thinking in terms of the whole product instead of just one story. In a lot of ways, it’s like you’re an ambassador of the process.”

Read more in 5 Signs You’re Ready to Be an Editor. [subscription required]

Andrea Hackett

How to Tell If Your Company is Exploiting Its Interns

Sure, unpaid internships are the backbone of countless media and film companies in LA, but that doesn’t mean they’re all effective or even legal. Just look at Harper’s BazaarCharlie Rose and the movie Black Swan – all companies were hit with lawsuits over unpaid work by former interns.

So, avoid all the headaches by first re-evaluating your hiring process. ”Haphazardly hiring interns can be a huge waste of time for both the intern and the company,” said Marc Scoleri, co-founder and CEO of creativeinterns.com.

Instead, think of the internship as an investment and plan accordingly. “An interview and discussion about the candidates’ skills, future plans and career interests will help clarify if the candidate will be a good match — and possibly a future employee,” he said.

For more tips on developing a mutually beneficial program, check out 7 Things That Are Ruining Your Company’s Internship Program.

ag_logo_medium.gifThis article is exclusively available to mediabistro.com AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, you can register for as little as $55 a year and get access to these articles, discounts on seminars and workshops, and more.

 

June Ambrose on How to Become a Fashion Stylist

Follow the conversations @juneambrose has with her “style socials” (or Twitter followers to you and me), and one thing becomes clear: people either want to dress like her or be her. So, in the final installment of our Media Beat interview, we got the celebrity stylist and star of VH1′s Styled by June to tell us the biggest mistake aspiring stylists make on the job.

“[A lack of] Osmosis. You know, sometimes, just sitting back and just sucking it all in, you learn so much,” Ambrose said. “When you’re new on the scene, I’ll definitely ask you trick questions just to kinda see where you are. Humility is your best aspect when you’re entering a new area, and I learned that. I would just sit around and just listen.”

But what about fashion courses — are they worth it? And how does a newbie afford the clothes necessary for editorial shoots? Watch the full video to find out.

Part 1: June Ambrose on Styling Diddy, Jay-Z and Hip-Hop’s Most Iconic Videos
Part 2: June Ambrose on Her New VH1 Show, Styled by June
Bonus! Stylist June Ambrose on Her Trademark Turban

Tista Games CEO Aunim Hossain: ‘We Need Writers’

Mediabistro’s Jason Boog is covering the Inside Social Apps conference in San Francisco, where he met up with Aunim Hossain, CEO of social gaming company Tista Games. Hossain argued that with the worldwide gaming audience of 500,000,000 people expected to triple in the next decade, the demand for writers who can craft compelling narratives will skyrocket.

“Storytelling is the best way of keeping people engaged and keeping them playing,” he argues.

For now, however, it looks like you need a solid programming background to work at Tista–narrative abilities or no. Still, we’ve already seen plenty of prominent Hollywood actors lend their talents to the gaming industry. How long before the best screenwriters start jumping ship?

Mikki Taylor’s Advice for Magazine Editors: ‘Take the Leap Forward’

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Mikki Taylor spent over 30 years at Essence, first in the mag’s fashion and sewing department in the early 80s and most recently as its cover and style director, and she says the key to longevity in publishing is a combination of good ideas, enthusiasm, and a pro-active attitude.

“First, you have to know the territory. You also have to know your gift,” she explained in our Media Beat interview. “Is there room for your gift at the magazine at which you currently work? And, if so, how will you play that forward? And how well are you selling yourself everyday not only in the things that you say but in your actions, in the ideas that you come to the table with. Are you asking yourself ‘what great things am I going to do today?’”

Watch the full video to find out how Taylor found the courage to leave Essence and start her own consultancy, Mikki Taylor Enterprises.

Part 1: Mikki Taylor on Her 30 Years at Essence
Part 2: Mikki Taylor: Michelle Obama Brings ‘Sophistication’ to American Style

How Brad Goreski Got an Internship at Vogue

Brad Goreski wasn’t always the beacon of style he is today. In our Media Beat interview, the star of It’s a Brad, Brad World revealed that he had to overcome a lack of access (he’s originally from a tiny town in Canada) and the doubts of others to climb to the top. One college career counselor, in particular, was quite taken aback by a young Goreski’s outsize ambition.

“She’s like, ‘Okay, so what do you wanna do?’ And I’m like, ‘I’m gonna get an internship at Vogue in New York.’ And she was like, ‘Excuse me?’ And I’m like, ‘I’m gonna get an internship at Vogue. Is that possible for me to get credit and go to New York?’ And she was like, ‘If you get the internship…’ And I was like, ‘Okay!’” Goreski told us. “And I came back later with all my paperwork, and she was like, ‘Are you really going to New York?’ I’m like, ‘Yeah! I’m going to work at Vogue!’”

Now, with a hit show on Bravo and Born to Be Brad: My Life in Style So Far due in bookstores in March, the taste maker credits those early work experiences for his success.

“Internships are so instrumental but, not only do you need to get them, you need to work at them,” he said.

Part 1: Breakout Styling Star Brad Goreski Takes Us Inside His Brad, Brad World
Part 2: Brad Goreski on His Falling Out with Rachel Zoe

‘Forbes Columnist’ Needs Willing Slave

This was sent to us by Howard Stier just before it was flagged for removal.

Let’s remember a “Forbes Columnist” is actually a former True/Slant blogger.

FORBES COLUMNIST SEEKS EDITORIAL INTERN (Hancock Park)

Date: 2011-07-05, 11:53PM PDT
Reply to: gigs-8afuw-2479386622@craigslist.org [Errors when replying to ads?]


I am seeking talented, well-trained, hard-working, and intrepid journalists, either in or fresh out of Journalism school, or equivalent, who know how to write and research on very tight deadlines. Knowledge of PhotoShop, HTML, Search Engine Optimization, WordPress, public policy issues and financial markets are all a plus, but these are not requirements. You can start immediately and will need to work at least 15 hours a week out of my Hancock Park office.

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