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NYFCC Verdicts: Armond White Expelled; Lou Lumenick Suspended

ArmondWhiteTwitterAvatarThe craziest film-journalist group kerfuffle this side of a Hollywood Foreign Press Association rumble has been brought to a swift and resolute close.

At a special emergency meeting today of the New York Film Critics Circle (NYFCC), it was decided that Armond White is to be expelled for his miscreant behavior at the organization’s recent annual awards gala. White continues to adamantly deny the accusations, even though there is corroborating audio and no one else has come forward to take ownership of the muttered comments about the filmmaker who accepted last night’s Best Drama Golden Globe.

Here’s the NYFCC statement issued today, via THR:

“The New York Film Critics Circle deeply regrets any embarrassment caused its guests or honorees by any member’s recent actions,” said Stephen Whitty, critic for the Star-Ledger and the group’s new chair. “Sadly, disciplinary measures had to be taken, to prevent any re-occurrence. We apologize again to our guests and look forward to the rest of 2014 and our 80th anniversary.”

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No Happy Ending for Gannett Reporters Past or Present

We all know what would have happened if a BuzzFeed staffer had been the one purchasing a legal ounce of “Blue Dream” in Colorado. We would today be watching a split, comparative video contrasting the high effects of legal vs. illegal marijuana.

Instead, Trevor Hughes of the Fort Collins Coloradoan nonsensically purchases $27 worth of legal Colorado weed and then, as agreed with his reimbursing boss, takes it straight to a local sheriff’s office to be destroyed. That’s just Cheech and wrong.

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Armond White Embarrasses Himself at NYFCC Awards Gala… Again [Updated]

ArmondWhiteTwitterAvatarThe good news, for those who attended the latest New York Film Critics Circle awards celebration: Armond White‘s outburst from the back of the room could not be heard at the front. The bad news: In a roomful of reporters, anything said can be quickly and duly noted, casting a permanent pall on the proceedings:

From the back of the Edison Hotel Ballroom, White yelled at Steve McQueen, the NYFCC’s Best Director winner for 12 Years a Slave. “You’re an embarrassing doorman and garbage man. F— you. Kiss my ass,” according to a Variety reporter seated near him.

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How to Achieve Financial Security as a Freelancer

SixfigureFreelancerFreelance writing isn’t an obvious route to monetary success. Many people choose to freelance because they want to pursue their passion, and making boatloads of money isn’t really the goal. But what if you could do what you love — and make a killing at the same time?

Our latest Mediabistro feature discusses various tips and tricks on how to score major moolah on your next assignment. Seeking out new markets is a great way to expand your repertoire and make new connections:

“Writers think that if they want to make a lot of money they have to pitch the biggest magazines because they pay the most,” said [Linda Formichelli, author and co-founder of the Renegade Writer blog]. But, she warns, those are so difficult to break into that “not many people make a living writing only for the consumer magazines.” As a veteran freelancer, she has shifted her writing focus to include trade (business-to-business) and custom publications (like the ones you get from your credit card or insurance company). It’s a strategy she suggests for other writers who want to earn more cash, too.

To hear more tips on how to earn a major paycheck as freelancer, read: How to Become a Six-Figure Freelancer.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Harvard Crimson Editor Questions Nicholas Kristof D-cision

HarvardCrimsonLogoEverything about Nicole J. Levin‘s open letter to Class of 1981 grad Nicholas Kristof is spot-on. Right down to the way she signs her missive:

Sincerely,

Nicole J. Levin
Magazine Editor at Large, former Executive Editor, and
future Pulitzer Prize potential nominee.

Levin’s letter strikes just the right tone with respect to where Kristof’s recent decision to drop the “D.” middle-initial from his byline falls in the grand scheme of things:

I’m sorry, but you can’t just drop the D. It goes against everything in The Crimson’s Style Guide. Once you break one rule, what’s next? Maybe you will start writing “first-year’s dean’s office” instead of “Freshman Dean’s Office.” Worse, you might start writing “am” instead of “a.m.” If you set the precedent of no middle initial soon the Crimson Style Guide will have no authority; all 15 pages in our Google Drive will be completely meaningless and arbitrary.

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Newspaper Vet Moves On from Patch Conference Call Layoff

RalphEllisThumbFrom August 2011 until August 2013, former Atlanta Journal Constitution reporter Ralph Ellis was the editor of Decatur/Avondale Estates Patch. Looking back this week on a tumultuous journalism-year-that-was, he still finds room on his list of “My Top Five Journalism Jobs of 2013” for the AOL hyper-local network. Even though he was rudely dumped via conference call and still to this day doesn’t understand how his bosses determined who got to stay and who had to go.

Intriguingly, Ellis’ list can be found on decaturish.com, a Patch competitor launched in the spring by Dan Whisenhunt that counts Ellis as a contributor. So what else does a grizzled newspaper guy who still loves to write do, post-Patch? In Ellis’ case, he has been freelancing for the New York Times, CNN.com and anyone else who will have him:

I write newsletters for WebMD on dogs, cats, gastrointestinal disorders and cold & flu, thus allowing me to pen headlines such as “Myths, Facts About Snot,” “Why Dogs Hump, Mount” and “The Scoop on Poop.”

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Robin Leach Celebrates 50 Years in Journalism

VegasDeluxeLogoThe great American adventure started for Leach on November 23, 1963. That’s when the British-born journalist and future, celebrated bon vivant arrived in Manhattan and found himself, like so many others before and since, a very long way from anything rich or famous:

I sailed into Manhattan Harbor onboard the Queen Mary and landed with no job and contacts and just $135 in my pocket. My first lodging was in a rundown hotel for $27 a week with the bathroom down the end of a corridor of beds.

It took me two days to get a job and, after selling shoes at a New York City department store, landed back in journalism at the Daily News of New York.

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Two Reporters Bound by Fleeting Oswald Memories

MauriceCarrollBookCoverThe first journalist is Maurice C. Caroll. As Capital New York’s Jimmy Vielkind recounts, on November 22, 1963 he was in Dallas for the New York Herald-Tribune:

When Oswald was shot, editors asked Carroll to write a first-person piece recounting his on-the-scene experience. Later, Carroll recalled, they realized they had forgotten to assign another writer to draft a main article. The result was a front-page report with Carroll’s byline that starts as hard news (cleanly written through by colleague Larry Shapiro, Carroll recalled) and then turns to Carroll’s personal observations.

“The prisoner, hands cuffed in front of him, was led into the cavernous garage under the station. Seconds before the shot, I shouted, ‘How about it, Lee?’

Those were very likely the last clear words Oswald heard before being shot, moments later, by Jack Ruby. The other journalist on this sad anniversary date is Pierce Allman. His encounter happened a little earlier.

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Vice’s Correspondent Confidential Reveals Journalists’ Untold Stories

There are two distinct narratives for journalists covering the same story for a long time: the story they publish, and the story they tell themselves or their friends over a beer. Producer Carrie Ching wants to reveal those untold personal stories with her new Vice web series, Correspondent Confidential, which screened last night at the Explorer’s Club on the Upper East Side. Every episode is a brief, animated tale told by a reporter, and a different artist illustrates each one.

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Pulitzer Prize-Winning Editor Pays Tribute to His Pulitzer Prize-Winning Role Model

SergeSchmemannPicDaily Princetonian writer Loully Saney took advantage of this week’s visit to campus by Pulitzer Prize-winning International New York Times editorial page editor Serge Schmemann (pictured) to ask the esteemed journalist some solid questions.

Alumni of Princeton and Harvard will definitely want to read the interviewee’s take on the differences between those two universities. When Saney asked which journalist Schmemann admires most, he got this wonderful bygone-era answer:

“Well, I had a lot of models, actually. Okay, I’ll say John Darnton. We were in Africa together — he was Times, I was AP. We spent some time together, then he went to Poland. I think he was one of the cleanest writers I have ever met.”

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