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On The Menu: Politico’s Calderone Talks About Terrorism Coverage

mmm_2-3.gifToday, Politico.com staff writer Michael Calderone joined hosts Jason Boog of GalleyCat and AgencySpy‘s Matt Van Hoven on the mediabistro.com Morning Media Menu to discuss the media’s recent coverage of terrorism.

Calderone discussed his coverage through Christmas of the attempted terrorism attack in Detroit and his blog post yesterday about The New York Times Magazine‘s decision to print its recent story on terrorism online two weeks before its scheduled print date.

“This is actually the longest stretch of time that the paper has ever published a magazine story online that’s going to end up in print. It’s still not going to be in the print edition for two more weeks,” he explained. “It shows something about how the Times thought that there was such an urgency to this story. And it also raises questions about the newspaper industry and whether you can sit on great material for a couple weeks or do you have to get it online as fast as possible.”

Also discussed: political memoirs to watch out for in 2010, including Karl Rove‘s upcoming book and what Calderone will be covering during the coming year.

You can listen to all the past podcasts at BlogTalkRadio.com/mediabistro and call in at 646-929-0321.

2010 Media Predictions: Year Of The Tablet?

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Today on the mediabistro.com Morning Media Menu podcast, hosts Jason Boog of GalleyCat and AgencySpy‘s Matt Van Hoven offered up some predictions for the New Year for advertising and publishing, pulled from experts around the Web.

Matt said creativity would abound in 2010, as agencies start to care a little less about polished end products and more about things like viral videos. Jason said he thought the same thing would be seen in publishing, causing the larger publishing houses — which are less nimble — to suffer.

Jason also said 2010 would be the year of the tablet. “The idea that we can have something the same size as a Kindle that has a color touch-screen and can be online all the time and can do the same things that my computer can do, that makes me very excited about reading,” he said. “I think it’s going to be a tremendous boon to the industry.”

Other predictions: brands will start acting more like people (“Very attractive people,” Jason added); a big year for angels; and, as the recession continues, more saving money online, from actual financial planning at Mint.com to using the Web to save money on everything from movies to engagement rings.

You can listen to all the past podcasts at BlogTalkRadio.com/mediabistro and call in at 646-929-0321.

What’s Your Biggest Media Moment Of The ’00s?

mmm_2-3.gifYesterday, on the mediabistro.com Morning Media Menu podcast, I had a chance to reflect on the most influential moment for me in the past decade — and one that has affected my career in the media. Menu hosts Jason Boog, the editor of GalleyCat and AgencySpy‘s Matt Van Hoven also weighed in on what they considered to be the biggest moments of the past ten years.

For me, the seminal moment of the decade was September 11. I was a freshman in college at the time, a week into studying Communications 101 at Boston University. The planes hit the World Trade Towers as I was getting ready to go to that very class that morning. When the next class rolled around two days later, my professor — also the dean of the communications school — put a picture of someone diving off one of the WTC buildings up in front of the class and asked us if we, the future of the media, would have published or broadcast the photo. My reaction to the photo, and my own personal answer to that question, have shaped my view of the media and my job ever since. Having looked upon that photo countless times throughout my first semester in college, I have yet to see it ever again.

Jason also picked a moment in the past ten years that has deeply affected me and so many others in this field — the toppling economy and the massive layoffs in the media industry that have followed. “It’s a rough environment to work in and I think it shakes us,” he explained. “And I think we are going to be a tougher generation for it.”

Matt said the biggest moment for him this decade was “the return of the American war machine.” “Just the change of the American culture globally has been very interesting to watch, and I really hope people get back to the place where they love us again, instead of hate us,” he added.

Now I’d like to crowdsource a little bit. What were the biggest moments for you in the ’00s? Share your thoughts in the comments below.

Remembering The Year That Was: FishbowlNY Editor On The Menu

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FishbowlNY editor Amanda Ernst visited the mediabistro.com Morning Media Menu podcast today, joining hosts Jason Boog of GalleyCat and AgencySpy‘s Matt Van Hoven to discuss the biggest media stories of 2009.

On Amanda’s list: stories about layoffs and magazine closings, but good news of circulation revenues climbing at places like The New York Times. Also, announcements of new magazine launches, like Afar and new Web sites, including Atlantic Wire, Mediaite and HollywoodLife.

Also discussed: the biggest stories of the year covered by the media — Balloon Boy, Michael Jackson and Tiger Woods among them — and how the media’s coverage has changed.

You can listen to all the past podcasts at BlogTalkRadio.com/mediabistro and call in at 646-929-0321.

On The Menu: The Best Movies Of 2009

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Avatar was the topic du jour on the mediabistro.com Morning Media Menu podcast this morning, as hosts Jason Boog of GalleyCat and AgencySpy‘s Matt Van Hoven discussed the year’s best movies with Infrastructurist.com editor and movie buff Melissa Lafsky.

All three decided that Avatar was one of the year’s best films, although Jason had trouble with the movie’s story and Melissa criticized its swipes at former President George W. Bush. Still Avatar‘s plot, involving humans overpowering an alien race while one man betrays his own kind to save the natives, is “a constant theme in movies,” Melissa pointed out. “It’s a constant plot line for a reason. We all have these fantasies of…going back to nature.”

In addition to Avatar, Matt’s list of the top 12 movies of the year included Where The Wild Things Are, The Informant, The Hangover, Adventureland, I Love You Man and Inglorious Basterds. Jason named The Hurt Locker his favorite film of the year, and picked The Fantastic Mr. Fox and Where The Wild Things Are as two of the best adaptations of the year, in addition to critical fave Precious and the blockbuster Twilight sequel New Moon.

Melissa disagreed with Jason about Where The Wild Things Are but sided with him on The Hurt Locker. She also named Drag Me To Hell and Up as her picks of the year. “You don’t see to many movies about getting old,” she said of the poignant Pixar pic.

Also discussed: the biggest infrastructure stories of 2009 and the decade.

You can listen to all the past podcasts at BlogTalkRadio.com/mediabistro and call in at 646-929-0321.

On The Menu: The Year In Publishing and Advertising

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Today on the mediabistro.com Morning Media Menu podcast, hosts Jason Boog of GalleyCat and AgencySpy‘s Matt Van Hoven recapped the best and the worst of the year in the publishing and advertising industries.

Jason started out the morning with the best in publishing: Twitter book deals and the Twilight saga’s success. Then Matt discussed one of AgencySpy’s most-read stories of the year, how an ad employee used Facebook to track down her laptop after it was accidentally swiped at a bar.

Matt also talked about how thousands of layoffs in the ad industry may be a positive for the coming year: now that the industry has self-corrected through layoffs, there might be more hiring in 2010. “There was a time this year that I couldn’t go a day without posting a layoff story, but I haven’t done one for a few weeks,” he said. “It’s definitely trickling to an end.”

Some worst highlights of the year: Wal-Mart’s book price war with Amazon and other outlets and two big advertising agencies closing offices in Detroit and Chicago. “Contraction was the story” of the year, Matt said. Who’s looking forward to 2010?

You can listen to all the past podcasts at BlogTalkRadio.com/mediabistro and call in at 646-929-0321.

On The Menu: Mediabistro’s Holiday Gift Guide

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We hate the term “last-minute gifts,” because it makes us feel nervous about being unprepared for the rapidly approaching holiday, especially since we just started our Christmas shopping yesterday. But for those of you who still need some gift recommendations (like us) today’s mediabistro.com Morning Media Menu is one to catch.

This morning, hosts Jason Boog of GalleyCat and AgencySpy‘s Matt Van Hoven offered some gift ideas for every media loving person on you list.

Jason provided some options for publishing related gifts, like a subscription to the New York Review of Books or a copy of one of the biggest books of the year, Pride, Prejudice and Zombies. Matt had some ideas for the advertising professional in your life, like The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Marketing Basics in paperback. Why paperback you might ask? “Because it’s only $4.39 on Amazon.com,” Matt said.

List in for more gift ideas, as well as a discussion about the 50 biggest Twitter trending topics of 2009. You can listen to all the past podcasts at BlogTalkRadio.com/mediabistro and call in at 646-929-0321.

FishbowlNY Editor On The Menu: The Feud Between NYT and WSJ Goes On

mmm_2-3.gif FishbowlNY editor Amanda Ernst joined host Jason Boog on the mediabistro.com Morning Media Menu podcast this morning to talk quickly about the biggest New York media story this week: the ongoing rivalry and back-and-forth spat between The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal.

“The Journal is planning to launch a New York section that is going to compete very directly with the Times, and [Journal owner] Rupert Murdoch over the years has shown no love…for the Times,” Amanda said. “So any chance they have to take a dig at them, they’re going to take it.”

Amanda and Jason also spoke with Robin F. Whitten, editor and publisher of AudioFile magazine, a publication about audiobooks, who made some great suggestions for holiday gifts.

You can listen to all the past podcasts at BlogTalkRadio.com/mediabistro and call in at 646-929-0321.

FishbowlNY Editor On The Menu: E&P Closure and Books Reviews After Kirkus

mmm_2-3.gifThis morning, host Jason Boog of GalleyCat was joined by special co-host Amanda Ernst, editor of FishbowlNY, on the mediabistro.com Morning Media Menu. The two welcomed Kat Meyer, chief content wrangler for Next Chapter Communications, moderator for the #followreader Twitter chat and a blogger at Follow The Reader.

The biggest news of the day was Nielsen Co.‘s decision to shutter book review journal Kirkus Reviews and newspaper industry trade Editor & Publisher. All three lamented the closings, but Amanda pointed out that E&P might have had a chance to be saved. Kat talked about what might possibly replace the reviews that Kirkus provided. Social media might provide a solution.

Also discussed: Kat’s optimistic wrap-up of 2009 and predictions about 2010, including a future with new e-readers like the much anticipated tablet.

You can listen to all the past podcasts at BlogTalkRadio.com/mediabistro and call in at 646-929-0321.

Peter Kafka Talks “Hulu For Magazines” On The Menu

mmm_2-3.gifTechnology and the media converged today on the mediabistro.com Morning Media Menu podcast, when host Jason Boog of GalleyCat and Joe Ciarallo of PRNewser welcomed Peter Kafka, tech and media writer for the blog AllThingsD.com.

Jason and Joe picked Pete’s brain about a few of the things he’s been covering closely, including the joint venture between the biggest magazine publishers that he’s been calling “Hulu for Magazines.” Joe asked Pete for his thoughts on the recent press release officially announcing the project.

“They haven’t launched a thing,” Pete said. “All they’ve really done is said, ‘We have an idea, which we’ve agreed to, which is that we’re going to band together and work on distribution and sales of these products that don’t exist yet.’…But really the most important idea really is the fact that they are going to try to control distribution prior to ever building anything.”

“Right now when a magazine actually sells you a subscription they know who you are, they know what your credit card number is, they want all of that,” he went on. “And they want to be able to go to Amazon, Apple and Google for that matter and say, ‘Look, if you want to sell these magazines, you’re going to need to work through us and we’re going to set prices and we’re going to control that relationship.’ That is the most important thing right now.”

Also discussed: Vevo, Boxee, Google and the dueling Wall Street Journal op-eds from Rupert Murdoch and Google CEO Eric Schmidt. Read more of Peter’s thoughts every day at AllThingsD.

You can listen to all the past podcasts at BlogTalkRadio.com/mediabistro and call in at 646-929-0321.

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