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Newspaper Reporter Explains the Reasons for His Departure

KevinSabanKevin Sablan (pictured), one of the Orange County Register journalists who recently took a buyout, has blogged today about how that decision was reached. He devotes a great deal of his post to what were, for him, the better Register days:

During my first eight years at the paper, I worked on advancing our digital efforts. I started as a slightly glorified Web monkey, part of a team that got stories online and made sure the site’s many moving parts were updated throughout the day.

Freedom. It was a great time. There weren’t enough bosses to review everything that published online, and standards were still being set. I could experiment without fear of losing my job. I threw in some fancy CSS and JavaScript trickery. I did things like embed a tour of the Rose Parade (a Google Map that could be navigated with custom buttons) into an article. I made tables sortable. I never had to ask for permission…

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Kentucky Resident Responds to NYT ‘Persistent Poverty’ Coverage

NYTHelpMeKYDuring the last weekend of June, the New York Times Magazine asked: “What’s the Matter With Eastern Kentucky?” Today, via an op-ed in The Floyd County Times, Jonathan Gay answers with the equivalent of: “Less than you think.”

Gay is the director of the Kentucky Innovation Network office in Morehead, where he works with local entrepreneurs. He
argues that the piece by Annie Lowrey was a classic case of big-city myopia and explains how he, pro-actively, is moving forward:

Rather than wait on the New York Times to tell that [hopeful] story, we’ve decided to start telling it ourselves. Through words, photos, tweets, social media and video, we will soon be launching a Web effort to tell the tales of entrepreneurs living in eastern Kentucky. We’ll begin with one each from the six eastern Kentucky counties the Times reported as being in the bottom 10.

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Daily News Calls Mayor an ‘Ass’

NY_DN

The New York Daily News has had it with Mayor de Blasio. The paper — along with Liam Neeson — desperately (and sort of weirdly) wants the mayor to allow the carriage horses to continue their work in Central Park. De Blasio, meanwhile, wants to replace them with electric cars.

To prove how many people care about the horses, the Daily News dropped 40,000 signed petitions at the mayor’s office. When de Blasio sent an aide to pick them up instead of doing so himself, the staff at the Daily News lost their minds. The result? Today’s front page.

Hey, at least they called him “Mr. Mayor.” Could have been worse.

New York Observer Posts Slideshow to End All Slideshows

Like most people, your FishbowlNY editors are not fans of the slideshow. We want to see all the pictures and/or content on one page, thank you very much. But even we have to admit that The New York Observer’s slideshow of people reading The New York Observer is extremely strong work.

The title of the slideshow — Readers React: Cooling Off with the Hot Ethan Hawke Issue — doesn’t do it justice. This can never be topped. A paper publishing 19 pictures of people reading the same paper is pure genius.

In fact, the only downside to this is that the Observer might have set the bar for slideshows too high. But who among us will complain that a star shines too brightly?

Newspaper Reporter Listed as ‘Endangered Job’


Newspaper reporter — along with meter reader, travel agent, lumberjack (sorry Dexter!), flight attendant and more — has been named one of the most endangered jobs of 2014. Even the Dodo went out more gracefully than this.

According to CareerCast, there’s pretty much no hope for the newspaper reporter:

Declining subscription and dwindling advertising sales have negatively impacted the hiring power of some newspapers, while others have ceased operations altogether. Online outlets continue to replace traditional newspapers, and the long-term outlook for newspaper reporters reflects the change.

Well, that’s certainly depressing. Accurate, but depressing.

[Image: Shutterstock]

NY Times Adds Styles Columnist

The New York Times has added Katie Rosman as a Sunday Styles editor and columnist. Rosman comes to the paper from The Wall Street Journal, where she had worked since 2004. She most recently served as a features reporter for the Journal’s Personal Journal section.

“I have been incredibly fortunate to work for the @WSJ for ten years,” tweeted Rosman. “It is a fantastic publication and the home of my dearest friends.”

Rosman will join the Times later this summer.

George Clooney Blasts Daily Mail

George Clooney has had it with The Daily Mail. In a letter posted by USA Today, the actor blasted the Daily Mail for publishing a story (which originally appear on its site) about him, his fiancee Amal Alamuddin, and her mother. The Daily Mail article said that Alamuddin’s mother was against the two getting married based on religious beliefs.

Clooney explained that the article was completely false, and called out the Daily Mail for being reckless. ”The irresponsibility, in this day and age, to exploit religious differences where none exist, is at the very least negligent and more appropriately dangerous,” wrote Clooney. “We have family members all over the world, and the idea that someone would inflame any part of that world for the sole reason of selling papers should be criminal.”

When the Great Clooney speaks, the world listens. Or at least, a paper that published an erroneous article listens. Not long after Clooney’s article was published, the Daily Mail issued a statement apologizing for the incident:

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New Jersey Newspaper Employee’s Mental Illness Chronicle Strikes a Chord

AsburyParkPressLogoThere are certain assignments and topics that journalists cherish. For Asbury Park Press reporter Shannon Mullen, this week’s “Story Behind a Story” was surely one of those occasions.

Mullen’s article is about the response garnered by co-worker Kathy Maloney‘s very first piece for the paper. Published on May 11, “My Life With Joe” recounted the administrative assistant’s struggles with her late husband’s mental illness:

Since the story appeared, Maloney, an administrative assistant in the newspaper’s design studio, has been inundated with emails, notes and phone calls from as far away as Ireland, where she has relatives.

One of the emails came from a woman in Ireland who lost her son to suicide. “There are so many points in the article that I can relate to,” she wrote. “I think it is such a brave thing to share your experience, where I can’t approach it. I wish I could.”

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Happy 125th Birthday, WSJ

wall_street_journal_logo_01As we’ve already noted, today is The Wall Street Journal’s 125th anniversary. To help celebrate, we played around with some of the interactive features the Journal launched for the occasion.

Our favorite is the WSJ 125 Archive, which lets you pick from sections — like Scandals, How We Live, Titans, Tragedies and more — or from major moments, like The Great Depression, and scroll through items that show you how the paper covered the stories. It’s a must for any news junkie.

Another unique interactive allows readers to peruse notes on the Journal’s first front page, published July 8, 1889. What was making news then? Wheat! “The Kansas wheat crop of 1889 was, at roughly 30 million bushels, nearly double the crop of the previous year and the third largest on record, behind 1884 and 1882,” explained the Journal.

The Journal’s full slate of digital content celebrating its anniversary is available here.

Happy birthday, Journal. Don’t party too hard tonight.

WSJ to Celebrate 125th Anniversary

Tomorrow, The Wall Street Journal turns 125. On July 8, 1889, a few fellas named Charles Dow, Edward Jones and Charles Bergstresser launched the paper as a four-page newsletter that cost two cents an issue. The goal, according to the trio, was to “aim steadily at being a paper of news, and not a paper of opinions. It will give a good deal of news not found in other publications, and it will present in the market article, its news, its tables and its advertisements, a faithful picture of the rapidly evolving panorama of the Street.”

To celebrate making it 125 years and still retaining a full head of hair, the Journal will publish a special edition of the paper tomorrow along with several unique online features.

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