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Photojournalism

NYT Archived Photos Blog Remains Lively

TheLivelyMorgueLogoMany of you are likely already familiar with The Lively Morgue, the Tumblr of archival New York Times pictures curated by photo editor Darcy Eveleigh. The stream is a wonderful walk down NYC memory lane, updated several times each week.

In an interview with Cult of Mac’s David Pierini, Eveleigh recalls how it all started:

Eveleigh became fascinated with the Times [photo] morgue on her very first trip shortly after she started in 2004. While working as a “floating” picture editor, she would take trips to the morgue during down time between assignments.

“One day very early on in the process I went down at around 11 a.m.,” she said. “Somewhere around 8 that night, my cellphone rang and it was my husband wondering where I was. I completely lost track of time, I was so wrapped up.”

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For This Photographer, ‘Grease’ Was the Career Word

Sometimes, the best part of an article is the author footnote.

2014OuterCriticsCircleAwardsBelow the broadwayworld.com photo gallery of Andrea Martin, Mare Winningham, Bryan Cranston and others who attended last night’s 64th Annual Outer Critics Circle Awards at Sardi’s, there is this mini-bio for photojournalist Walter McBride:

As a 14-year-old youth, Walter was transfixed by his first Broadway show, the original production of Grease. His journey to celebrity photojournalism began that fateful night.

Meeting, photographing and getting to know the cast inspired him to spend his professional life doing what he loved… Recently, he made his Broadway debut sharing the stage with Hugh Jackman in Hugh Jackman on Broadway as well as receiving the Actors’ Equity Association Gypsy Spirit Award.

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Exhibit, Book Pay Tribute to ‘Father of Canadian Photojournalism’

TedGrantCoverPreviewing Thursday and opening Friday at the Leica Gallery (607 Broadway), “Ted Grant: Sixty Years of Legendary Photojournalism” showcases a photographer known for, among other things, a shot of Canadian Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau sliding down a staircase banister at the 1968 Liberal party convention.

Over the years, Grant also taught students at Carleton University in Ottawa and later, in British Columbia, where he is now based. One former student, Carol Goar, recalls in a recent Toronto Star column how another student, Thelma Fayle, played a critical role in the exhibit coming together:

Twenty-five years after she took his course, Fayle sent a letter to Grant asking for advice on a magazine profile she’d been assigned. Not only did he respond to her letter, he came to her house with his wife Irene. They chatted at her kitchen table for three hours. Without being asked, he accompanied her to the interview, stayed in the background and took some of the most evocative photos she’d ever seen.

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Swedish Photographer Wins Getty Images Portrait Prize

Ten thousand dollars; an exhibit at Polka Galerie in Paris. That’s the enviable combo recently awarded to photographer Maja Daniels.

The Swedish-born Daniels is the winner of the first Contour by Getty Images Portrait Prize. She beat out 720 entrants from a total of 68 countries.

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Jamie McCarthy, Celebrity Photographer: ‘It’s All About Trust’

Jamie-McCarthy_crop

Jamie McCarthy has a job that many people (photographers and non-photographers alike) would kill for: He gets to rub elbows with celebrities and take pictures of them. McCarthy’s been in the industry for 17 years, snapping hundreds of celebrities and getting to know them on a personal level, too.

The photographer was mentored by his uncle, the legendary celebrity and nightlife photographer Patrick McMullan. They worked together for eight (somewhat tumultuous) years before McCarthy decided to give his solo career a shot. He now works for both WireImage and Getty Images.

McCarthy recently spoke with FishbowlNY editor Richard Horgan about his favorite clients, surprising reactions to his work, the ubiquitous TMZ and why building trust with celebrities is essential. Here’s an excerpt:

Has the rise of TMZ affected the way you do your job?
Not really. My team of photographers at Getty, we’re kind of like the anti-TMZ. We’re the guys that are pretty much on the inside. So we’re the guys who want to do the nice photos and make them look good, whereas TMZ and those guys I feel like they’re looking more for the dirt on celebrities. My clients hire me because they know they can trust me and I’m not going to give up secrets about them and I make them look good. I want people who see the photos to say, ‘Wow, she looks beautiful’ or ‘He’s great-looking.’ Also, I only shoot at events where people are expecting photographs to be taken. I’ve never tried to shoot people in their personal lives. That’s not my style.

To learn more about McCarthy and his work, read So What Do You Do, Jamie McCarthy, Celebrity Photographer?

Aneya Fernando

Bearing Witness to the Impact of Wartime Digital Photography

Among those in attendance Wednesday night for a book event at the Brooklyn Brewery, an establishment owned and operated by former AP war correspondent Steve Hindy, was Abraham Moussako. Today, via the Columbia Journalism Review, he offers a good summary of the conversation that took place about covering the Iraq War.

Joining Hindy was Pulitzer Prize-nominated photojournalist Michael Kamber and two Pulitzer winners featured in his new book Photojournalists on War: The Untold Stories from IraqTodd Heisler (New York Times, Rocky Mountain News) and Carolyn Cole (LA Times). Moussako lists the pertinent takeaways, including this truism likely taken for granted by many readers today:

Unlike wars in the past, when photographers were sometimes long gone from the front-line by the time the photos appeared in print, soldiers and their commanders were able to react to photos taken in the morning by that very afternoon. Oftentimes they would criticize the pictures. In some cases, they even used them to target insurgents.

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