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Photojournalism

Honoring the First American Woman Correspondent Killed in Action

MilwaukeePressClubLogoAmong the journalists being inducted Friday into the Milwaukee Media Hall of Fame is the one and only Dickey Chapelle. The late photographer’s trailblazing run as a female war correspondent began during World War II in Iwo Jima, when she detoured away from a women’s magazine assignment, and ended with her death in Vietnam in 1965.

Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reporter Meg Jones put together a wonderful remembrance of Chapelle, born in Milwaukee as Georgette Meyer. Chapelle was very possibly the first female journalist to report from the Vietnam War front, and wanted no preferential treatment while doing it:

In 1962 an officer tried to deny her access to covering a field operation, arguing that there were no toilets for women in the jungle.

“According to my AP colleague Fred Waters,” recalled Peter Arnett, who met Chapelle, in an email interview, “Dickey, in her olive drab field gear, and her feet firmly planted on the ground, snarled at him, ‘Listen soldier don’t worry about me, and when I have to I can piss standing up straight just like you do!’ Of course, Dickey went on the patrol.”

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Mediabistro Course

Freelance Magazine Writing

Freelance Magazine WritingInstructor and journalist Jeryl Brunner has written for numerous publications including O, the Oprah Magazine, Travel + Leisure, VanityFair.com and more! Starting November 3, she'll teach you how to query specific publications, find resources for reporting, and create captivating stories that editors will want and readers will enjoy. Register now!

Vogue Photographer Patiently Awaits His Next Assignment

In Toronto for the opening of an exhibition of his photos at Yorkville’s Izzy Gallery, famed Vogue photographer Arthur Elgort took the time to chat with Canadian Press.

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Among other things, he came up with a job title that really should be the one printed on Anna Wintour‘s Condé Nast business cards:

Vogue are not using me at the moment. I don’t know why,” said the genial 74-year-old New York native, who suffered a stroke in 2011. “I’m going to wait and send (Wintour) a Christmas card and say, ‘I’m ready for you anytime you’re ready for me.’ But I think she’s so busy now because I think now she’s the head of everything, and that’s a lot of things to do.”

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Martin Schoeller’s Pivotal Career Boost

Martin Schoeller is an award-winning photographer who for many years was on staff with The New Yorker. And as he reminds this week, his ascension to that position owes a great deal to a certain Oscar-winning actress.

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In 1998, freelancer Schoeller counted just five assigned jobs – three of which were weddings. In 1999, the year he was hired by The New Yorker, that total would jump to 127.

Per Schoeller’s contribution to the Time Lightbox series “The Photo That Made Me,” it all changed for him after he was asked in 1998 to photograph Vanessa Redgrave for Time Out New York:

I had come across the Kino Fluorescent lighting system (a sort of fluorescent tube lighting) and started to incorporate it into my work. This started to change things: these lights really bring out a subject’s eyes. And because I had adopted the style of a super close-up portrait, my work started to stick out. Back then the mainstream thing to do was a more distanced shot with a perfect background and styling – and it was also a time when Photoshop was really becoming a big part of things.

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A Storied Photographer Turns 95

When you’ve lived for almost a century, traditional birthday celebrations can seem somewhat redundant. So in Phil Stern‘s case, he is marking his 95th turn around the make-a-wish corner by gifting someone else. Stern, who will officially mark his latest birthday in Los Angeles tomorrow, has donated prints of 95 of his iconic shots to the Veterans Home of California.

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From a report in Variety by Shelli Weinstein:

As a teen, Stern had worked as an apprentice in a New York photo studio and as a local police photographer, but got his baptism of fire, quite literally, at age 21, when he became a combat photographer in Darby’s Rangers during World War II, after convincing Colonel William O. Darby to allow him to join. Stern was decorated with a Purple Heart for his services…

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New Yorker Photo Editor: ‘It’s About More Than the Picture That Gets Published’

Seattle native Whitney C. Johnson is back in her hometown to give a lecture at the Seattle Art Museum.

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Ahead of the museum talk, she spoke via telephone with The Stranger visual arts writer Jen Graves about her seven years on the job as one of The New Yorker‘s team of photo editors. At one point during the informative Q&A, Johnson – now the director of photography – outlined her admirable big-picture M.O.:

“I try to assign photographers assignments that can contribute to a person’s body of work. Thomas Struth had a show in New York recently, and one of the images he shot on assignment for us. Moises Saman was recently showing me the book dummy for his work from the Middle East over the last five years or so, and I’d say about 20 percent of the pictures he’s shot on assignment for us.”

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Fifty Years Later, Bob Dylan Assignment Still Reverberates

ForeverYoungCoverAlthough Look magazine killed a planned 1964 feature story on Bob Dylan, deeming the cresting singer “too scruffy for a family magazine,” the photographs from the spiked assignment continue to be appreciated today. The shots were taken over a span of several weeks in New York City, Woodstock and at the Newport Folk Festival.

Photographer Douglas Gilbert was able to reclaim the pics after Look ceased publication, turning them into the 2005 book Forever Young, lending them to Martin Scorsese for a PBS documentary and sharing them via an ongoing, traveling gallery show. With the exhibit currently at Michigan’s South Haven Center for the Arts, area native Gilbert took time to share a few anecdotes with Kalamazoo Gazette entertainment writer John Liberty. Starting with this one:

Gilbert steered through a small town in New York when his passenger, a 23-year-old Bob Dylan, shouted, “Stop the car! Stop the car!”

Gilbert, a relatively green 21-year-old photographer from Michigan, obliged as the curly-haired musician ran to a newspaper stand on the side of the road. Gilbert said Dylan was drawn to a magazine with news about aliens on the cover.

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NYT Archived Photos Blog Remains Lively

TheLivelyMorgueLogoMany of you are likely already familiar with The Lively Morgue, the Tumblr of archival New York Times pictures curated by photo editor Darcy Eveleigh. The stream is a wonderful walk down NYC memory lane, updated several times each week.

In an interview with Cult of Mac’s David Pierini, Eveleigh recalls how it all started:

Eveleigh became fascinated with the Times [photo] morgue on her very first trip shortly after she started in 2004. While working as a “floating” picture editor, she would take trips to the morgue during down time between assignments.

“One day very early on in the process I went down at around 11 a.m.,” she said. “Somewhere around 8 that night, my cellphone rang and it was my husband wondering where I was. I completely lost track of time, I was so wrapped up.”

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For This Photographer, ‘Grease’ Was the Career Word

Sometimes, the best part of an article is the author footnote.

2014OuterCriticsCircleAwardsBelow the broadwayworld.com photo gallery of Andrea Martin, Mare Winningham, Bryan Cranston and others who attended last night’s 64th Annual Outer Critics Circle Awards at Sardi’s, there is this mini-bio for photojournalist Walter McBride:

As a 14-year-old youth, Walter was transfixed by his first Broadway show, the original production of Grease. His journey to celebrity photojournalism began that fateful night.

Meeting, photographing and getting to know the cast inspired him to spend his professional life doing what he loved… Recently, he made his Broadway debut sharing the stage with Hugh Jackman in Hugh Jackman on Broadway as well as receiving the Actors’ Equity Association Gypsy Spirit Award.

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Exhibit, Book Pay Tribute to ‘Father of Canadian Photojournalism’

TedGrantCoverPreviewing Thursday and opening Friday at the Leica Gallery (607 Broadway), “Ted Grant: Sixty Years of Legendary Photojournalism” showcases a photographer known for, among other things, a shot of Canadian Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau sliding down a staircase banister at the 1968 Liberal party convention.

Over the years, Grant also taught students at Carleton University in Ottawa and later, in British Columbia, where he is now based. One former student, Carol Goar, recalls in a recent Toronto Star column how another student, Thelma Fayle, played a critical role in the exhibit coming together:

Twenty-five years after she took his course, Fayle sent a letter to Grant asking for advice on a magazine profile she’d been assigned. Not only did he respond to her letter, he came to her house with his wife Irene. They chatted at her kitchen table for three hours. Without being asked, he accompanied her to the interview, stayed in the background and took some of the most evocative photos she’d ever seen.

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Swedish Photographer Wins Getty Images Portrait Prize

Ten thousand dollars; an exhibit at Polka Galerie in Paris. That’s the enviable combo recently awarded to photographer Maja Daniels.

The Swedish-born Daniels is the winner of the first Contour by Getty Images Portrait Prize. She beat out 720 entrants from a total of 68 countries.

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