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Scandalous

Janice Dickinson Says First Draft of 2002 Autobiography Included Cosby Assault Details

ShutterstockJaniceDickinsonThe latest woman to publicly accuse Bill Cosby of sexual assault is the most famous yet.

It started this week with a Vice article by Tracie Egan Morrissey, who excerpted passages about Cosby from former supermodel Janice Dickinson‘s 2002 autobiography No Lifeguard on Duty. It quickly escalated with Dickinson shockingly filling in the blanks in an exclusive interview with Entertainment Tonight co-host Kevin Frazier.

While the additional, shared details were immediately dismissed by Cosby attorney Marty Singer as “a defamatory fabrication,” some earlier legal wrangling with Cosby apparently kept these allegations from surfacing well before 2004 accuser Andrea Constand:

Dickinson says she tried to write about the assault in her 2002 autobiography, but claims that when she submitted a draft with her full story to HarperCollins, Cosby and his lawyers pressured her and the publisher to remove the details.

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Bill Cosby Accuser Restates Her Case

ShutterstockBillCosby2014The headline of today’s Washington Post first-person essay by Barbara Bowman dramatically sums up what is to follow: “Bill Cosby Raped Me. Why Did It Take 30 Years for People to Believe My Story?

Bowman writes that given the amount of attention she has been able to bring to her accusations over the past ten years, she is puzzled it took the fall 2014 cry of a male stand-up comedian for the world to finally take notice. Her allegations are damning:

Over the years, I’ve struggled to get people to take my story seriously. So last month, when reporter Lycia Naff contacted me for an interview for the Daily Mail, I gave her a detailed account. I told her how Cosby won my trust as a 17-year-old aspiring actress in 1985, brainwashed me into viewing him as a father figure and then assaulted me multiple times. In one case, I blacked out after having dinner and one glass of wine at his New York City brownstone, where he had offered to mentor me and discuss the entertainment industry.

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Amanda Knox Flies Under the Radar as Seattle Freelancer

The most astonishing thing about AOL breaking news and original content managing editor Ryan Gorman‘s scoop (with a Twitter assist from Ryan Chittum) isn’t so much that Amanda Knox is covering the arts for a hometown weekly newspaper. It’s that she has been doing so… for several months.

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From Gorman’s article:

The Westside Weekly publisher Ken Robinson confirmed to AOL News that Knox has been a freelance arts reporter at the publication since this summer…

Knox works mostly from home, Robinson said. He has never actually met her in person. “I only have contact with her through email,” he added.

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Fox News Gets the Zellweger Skinny

Once upon a time, Tom Cruise told Renée Zellweger: “You complete me.” But today, it’s all about Renee’s complete “new” me.

In the wake of Zellweger’s shockingly unfamiliar red carpet face, presented Monday at Elle magazine’s “Women in Hollywood” awards event in Los Angeles, Fox News did a little investigating. Our main takeaway? We’re a long way from Hollywood’s Golden Age:

“It looks like she had eyelid surgery, blepharoplasty, Botox, lip fillers and cheek fillers,” founder and partner of Fountain Medical Group Dr. Todd Schlifstein, who doesn’t treat Zellweger, told FOX 411. “It appears she changed the shape of eye and eyelid. She removed excess skin, tightened skin around the area.”

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Ahead of Guardian Expose, Whisper Rewrites Terms of Service

Want to read a most acute spark for a corporate PR crisis?

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Here it is, from an investigative report shared today by Guardian reporters Paul Lewis and Dominic Rushe:

Approached for comment last week, Whisper said it “does not follow or track users.” The company added that the suggestion it was monitoring people without their consent, in an apparent breach of its own terms of service, was “not true” and “false.”

But on Monday – four days after learning The Guardian intended to publish this story – Whisper rewrote its terms of service; they now explicitly permit the company to establish the broad location of people who have disabled the App’s geolocation feature.

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Shia LaBeouf Talks Whiskey, Cigarettes and Cabaret

This may be a small consolation for actor Shia LaBeouf, and certainly not what he was aiming for when he started out that day watching the FIFA World Cup at a Manhattan bar. But last night on Jimmy Kimmel Live, the actor – over the course of seven ribald, hilarious minutes – joined the ranks of all-time great late night talk show anecdotes.

The tale of how LaBeouf wound up in a New York City police station holding cell, admitting that he was in for Cabaret, is more in line with the New York of Johnny, Ed and another one on the rocks. At one point in the story, LaBeouf doesn’t just joke that it could have been Allen Iverson instead of Alan Cumming up there on stage; he runs, hilariously, with that swap-out for the rest of his Great White WTF recollection.

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A Daily News Lede That Was Anything But Championship Caliber

BillMadden1954CoverAs a reminder of how much times and sportswriting have changed, let’s telescope back – courtesy of Bill Madden‘s recent book 1954 – to this date 60 years ago. On September 30, 1954, New York Daily News readers were treated to the following World Series Game One summary lede by famed sportswriter Dick Young:

The story of the Giants 5-2 victory over Cleveland in yesterday’s World Series opener should be written vertically from top to bottom in Chinese hieroglyphics. It was won on a 10th inning homer that was not only sudden death but pure murder… right out of a Charlie Chan yarn.

Ming Toy Rhodes, sometimes called Dusty by his Occidental friends, was the honorable person who, as pinch hitter, delivered a miserable bundle of wet wash to the first row in right field in Polo Grounds some 258 1/2 feet down the block from the laundry.

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Canned Forbes Contributor Stands By Column

In an email to iMediaEthics managing editor Sydney Smith, Bill Frezza admits that his quickly deleted Forbes blog post was not a good fit for the site and used a photo that was in poor taste.

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But otherwise, he is not apologizing:

“I stand by every word I wrote and it appears that I have kicked off a national conversation on this [college drinking] subject, which was my goal. Most people have no idea what is going on on college campuses these days due to the ill-advised raising of the drinking age from 18 to 21, forcing so much of it to go underground… Unless and until we begin holding individuals accountable for their own behavior, and not institutions, my headline says it all.”

Frezza was quickly axed from the Forbes contributors roster; online reaction to his final column has been swift and, in some cases, questionable. For example, The Frisky headlined him a “Frat Douche.” (Frezza is president of The Beta Foundation, house corporation for MIT’s Chi Phi fraternity.)

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Jezebel Editor Questions ‘Deliberately Misleading’ GMA Reporting

Newly crowned Miss America Kira Kazantsev was on Good Morning America today, rebutting the harshest elements of Jezebel’s Monday exclusive about her alleged involvement in some Hofstra University hazing.

MissAmericaGMA

Jezebel news editor Erin Gloria Ryan questioned, via Twitter, the soft handling of the controversy by a news show airing on the same network as the beauty pageant. She has followed with further accusations of lazy journalism:

It should also be noted that in “reporting” on this story, GMA did not reach out to me or anyone at Jezebel for comment or clarification; they just had Kazantsev on to deliver her talking points to a sympathetic anchor on the TV home of Miss America. If ABC had reached out, they would have known that since the story ran, we’ve learned more, and that things are still developing on our end. It would have been a tougher interview. But that’s clearly not what GMA wanted.

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Article Author, NYT Culture Editor Address Shonda Rhimes Outcry

Sometimes, it’s all about the article updates.

Adding to a post this morning about the furor surrounding New York Times TV critic Alessandra Stanley‘s weekend piece on Shonda Rhimes‘ new ABC-TV program How To  Get Away With Murder, public editor Margaret Sullivan has shared post-publication feedback from culture editor Danielle Mattoon and author Stanley.

AlessandraStanley_09_18

Let’s start with Mattoon’s remarks. Rhetorical is all fine and dandy, but next time, she and her fellow NYT editors may want to make sure a question mark (or some other equivalent indicator) punctuates this approach. As written, the first-paragraph intent was not clear enough:

“Alessandra used a rhetorical device to begin her essay,” Mattoon said, “and because the piece was so largely positive, we as editors weren’t sensitive enough to the language being used…”

She told me that multiple editors — at least three — read the article in advance but that none of them raised any objections or questioned the elements of the article that have been criticized.

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