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Glimpses of New York City Subway Riders, Circa 1966

DannyLyonUnderground1966There’s no better place to exhibit a group of vintage photos of NYC subway riders than a New York City subway stop.

Per Fast Company staff writer Carey Dunne, the number of photos on display at the Atlantic Avenue-Barclays Center stop is relatively small (eight). But oh, what photos they are:

In 1966, photographer Danny Lyon returned to his hometown of New York City after spending years documenting the Civil Rights Movement in the South and motorcycle gangs in Chicago. Once back in the city, Lyon took his mother’s advice: “If you’re bored, just talk to someone on the subway.” Using a Rolleiflex camera and Kodak color transparency film, he started taking photographs of New York’s commuters and its dingy, fluorescent-lit train stations.

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A Superstar DJ and Five Tagline Winners

VictorCalderonePicTomorrow night and well into Sunday morning, DJ Victor Calderone will spin patrons through the second monthly installment of MATTER+. The initial edition of the event October 4 at Space Ibiza’s gargantuan New York outpost on West 50th Street went for seven hours.

To help spread the MATTER+ word, the club held a best-tagline contest. This morning on Facebook, five winners were announced, all of whom will be put on the guest list, given a T-shirt and – best of all – granted a booth visit. FishbowlNY’s favorite of the winning entries comes from Gabi Yitzhakov:

What’s the MATTER+? Can’t handle the bass? Then step away from the speaker.

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Chelsea Hotel Extends Blondie Exhibit

You’ve got a few more days to check out the “Blondie 40th Anniversary” show at the Chelsea Hotel, curated by band members Deborah Harry and Chris Stein with help from art dealer Jeffrey Deitch. The collection of photographs, T-shirts and concert memorabilia was scheduled to come down this past Monday, September 29. But due to popular demand, the exhibit has been extended through next Monday, October 6.

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The Daily Beast’s Tim Teeman recently checked out the show at the Storefront Gallery on West 23rd Street. He says a large part of the attraction is the crowd and people-watching:

The [Chelsea Hotel] staff have heard “countless” stories from gallery visitors of drug-taking, drinking and sexual relations back in the day “that don’t sound credible.” One lady claimed she had a “magical connection” to Harry after a video of Blondie played in a Swiss chalet she was staying in. Another lady pressed a gift into the staff member’s hands to pass on to Harry, saying she had promised to pass it on to her when they had a chat 14 years before.

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David Cronenberg Brings His Debut Novel to Brooklyn

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The advance reviews for David Cronenberg‘s debut novel Consumed are impressive. And befitting the pedigree of the author, they come from such folks as Stephen King, J.J. Abrams and Viggo Mortensen.

Cronenberg will be in town tomorrow night for a free book signing and reading at St. Francis College in Brooklyn. The event, which is being co-presented by Book Court, starts at 7 p.m at Founders Hall. The filmmaker’s latest protagonists are, per usual, of the moment:

The story of two journalists whose entanglement in a French philosopher’s death becomes a surreal journey into global conspiracy.

Stylish and camera-obsessed, Naomi and Nathan thrive on the yellow journalism of the social-media age. They are lovers and competitors — nomadic freelancers in pursuit of sensation and depravity, encountering each other only in airport hotels and browser windows…

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NYU Celebrates the Work of an Apartheid-Era Photojournalist

After fleeing South Africa in the mid-1960s, photographer Ernest Cole sadly wound up living homeless on the streets of New York City. He died in 1990, at age 49, just one week after the release of Nelson Mandela from prison.

But the memory of Cole’s robust art lives on this fall thanks to an exhibit running through December 6 at NYU’s Grey Art Gallery. The courageous photojournalist was also a topic of discussion today on WNYC’s The Leonard Lopate Show. Former New York Times executive editor Joseph Lelyveld, who befriended Cole in South Africa and wrote the introduction to the photographer’s seminal 1967 book House of Bondage, reminisced about Cole’s life and work.

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Neil Diamond Announces Surprise Brooklyn Concert

If you’re not doing anything this afternoon and have a special place in your musical heart for Neil Diamond, you might want to head on down to Flatbush.

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Per a couple of tweets earlier today, in this the new social age of music promotion, Diamond announced a surprise 6 p.m. concert tonight in Brooklyn at Erasmus Hall High School, where he was a student from 1954 to 1956. The performer is asking people not to line up before 3 p.m. for free tickets.

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New Jersey University Hosts Springsteen Symposium

shutterstockBruceSpringsteenToronto2012Bruce Springsteen was born to turn 65 on September 23, 2014. Ahead of the big day, New Jersey’s Monmouth University is hosting an all-day celebration and examination of the singer-songwriter’s catalog and influence.

The Saturday 9:30 a.m.-3:3:0 p.m. event is titled “Fifty Years of ‘Makin’ This Guitar Talk” and is being put on with help from The Friends of The Bruce Springsteen Special Collection. The impressive line-up of panelists includes:

- Jim Beviglia, author of Counting Down Bruce Springsteen: His 100 Finest Songs;
- Jonathan D. Cohen, managing editor of the University of Virginia’s BOSS: The Bi-Annual Online Journal of Springsteen Studies
;
- Stan Goldstein, co-author of Rock & Roll Tour of the Jersey Shore and blogger at NJ.com;
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Celebrating the Work of a 100-Year-Old Illustrator

It should be a grand old time tomorrow night at the Museum of the City of New York. That’s because among those expected for the McCauley “Mac” Conner exhibit opening night party is the man himself, age 100.

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From the exhibit notes:

Conner grew up admiring Norman Rockwell magazine covers in his father’s general store. He arrived in New York as a young man to work on wartime Navy publications and stayed on to make a career in the city’s vibrant publishing industry.

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Fifty Reasons to Love John Waters

JohnWatersLincolnCenterBeginning tonight with Female Trouble and ending September 14 with Cry-Baby, Film Society Lincoln Center is paying tribute to an American original via “Fifty Years of John Waters: How Much Can You Take?

If Waters so chooses, FishbowlNY can take 50 more years. Partly because it will mean that we are treated to many more interviews like this one, in the New York Times, by Melena Ryzik. Here’s the 68-year-old Waters on the halo of the Lincoln Center event:

The retrospective is “the first time I can say I’m really being honored without irony,” he said in a phone interview. “It’s like being alive at your funeral. I’m not going to get anything better.”

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Bronx Documentary Center to Host James Foley Fundraiser

The Bronx Documentary Center had a long history with the late James Foley. The slain journalist attended the organization’s Reporters Instructed in Saving Colleagues (RISC) class and became a good friend there to many.

He also, through the center, took an active role in helping the family of Anton Hammerl, a South African freelance photographer who was killed in Libya in 2011. From a blog post by center director Mike Kamber:

James took the initiative to raise money for Hammerl’s family. The result: $135,000 for Anton’s childrens’ education and care. Many lament terrible events; James took action to make the world a better place… James changed the world in positive ways and was an immeasurably braver and more decent man than those who took his life.

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