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Archives: January 2010

Joan Rivers|No More News Corp. Deal With NYT|Zuckerman Weighs In On Local Journal Section|Bloomberg In A Reuters Ad|Salinger TK|NYTimes.com Pay Wall

Vanity Fair: Former late night host Joan Rivers: Jay Leno isn’t funny.

Editor & Publisher: News Corp. is no longer in talks with The New York Times over printing The Wall Street Journal.

Forbes: New York Daily News publisher Mortimer Zuckerman calls Rupert Murdoch‘s plan to launch a local New York section of The Wall Street Journal “a brilliant move”, but worries that there may not be enough advertising to go around for all of the local NY news outlets.

AgencySpy: Would you have been able to tell that there are Bloomberg screens in this ad for Thomson Reuters?

J. Alfred Proofreader: Oops, looks like The New York Times forgot to fill a TK in its obit of J.D. Salinger.

Time: Could the Times‘ pay wall plans imply an impending death for the newspaper? “The online-pay-wall plan is the Times saying things cannot continue at this rate. Something has to give, and the paper is hoping it will be its readers’ purse strings. And if not? What would its fans — and its critics — do without it?”

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Cablevision Exec Responds to Low Subscriber Numbers

cablevision_logo_med.gifThere has been much egg on the face of Cablevision after its pay wall plan for Newday.com was revealed earlier this week to have only 35 subscribers.

Tad Smith, Cablevision’s president for local media, reached out to Romenesko in an email declaring that the success of the pay wall initiative isn’t measured by the company in the number of people who subscribed to the $260-a-year service, but by “the change in unique visitors compared year over year in the New York metro area (our target audience).” And those unique visitors, according to Cablevision, have only decreased two percent in December 2009 compared to the same month last year. The slight decrease may be due in part to the fact that many of Newsday.com’s readers are Cablevision subscribers, and therefore get to read the site for free anyway.

Still, using a newspaper only to increase your subscriber sales isn’t anything to crow about, says Slate‘s Marion Maneker:

“Either way, Smith seems to be declaring that Cablevision’s $632 million acquisition of Newsday was simply to add another freebie to Cablevision’s subscription bundle. This was every analyst’s worst fear when it was announced that the Dolans had the winning bid for Newsday. Instead of expanding the subscription base for the newspaper and increasing advertising inventory for the cable business (buy a local ad on Cablevision and get a newspaper and Web ad as value-add), they paid a premium for some local content.”

So Cablevision is using Newsday not just as a newspaper, but as a way to sweeten the deal for Internet subscribers to choose their service. But that’s not to say that Newsday would be better off had Rupert Murdoch had purchased the paper in 2008. Whose to say the site wouldn’t be behind a pay wall in that scenario?

Read More: Newsday exec: We don’t measure success by how many people sign up to pay $260/year for our website –Romenesko

Cablevision Exec Defends Newsday Web Strategy –Slate

Previously: Newsday’s Pay Wall Experiment Yields Disappointing Results

Six Finalists Announced For Investigative Reporting Prize

twitter-logo22.jpgOn March 23, one group of intrepid reporters will be winning $25,000 for the 2010 Goldsmith Prize for Investigative Reporting. The six finalists announced today come from such varied locales and media as KHOU-TV in Houston, The Boston Globe, and ProPublica. Being a finalist carries a $10,000 award. Who says that journalism doesn’t pay?

According to the Harvard Kennedy School of Government’s Web site, the goal of the Goldsmith prize is to “recognize and encourage journalism which promotes more effective and ethical conduct of government, the making of public policy, or the practice of politics by disclosing excessive secrecy, impropriety and mismanagement, or instances of particularly commendable government performance.”

See the full list of winners after the jump.

Read More: Shorenstein Center Announces Book Prize Winners and Finalists for the 2010 Goldsmith Prize for Investigative Reporting — Harvard Kennedy School

Read more

Recovered ABC News Correspondent Bob Woodruff Celebrates ‘Alive Day’

Four years ago today, ABC News’ Bob Woodruff narrowly escaped death.

Reporting from Iraq, the World News Tonight co-anchor was in a convoy struck by a roadside bomb, injuring both Woodruff and cameraman Doug Vogt. But in the four years since, Woodruff has beaten the insurmountable odds to recover from his serious brain injury and work on camera again.

Today, our sister blog TVNewser reports, Woodruff is celebrating his ‘Alive Day’ with a father-daughter dance with his twin nine-year-old daughters, as well as a big interview with former John Edwards aide Andrew Young on 20/20 tonight. Woodruff promises some big news from his interview with Young — “revelations that you’ll hear from an aide who was witness to much of this incredible mess.”

And even bigger news for Woodruff — he has stopped going to speech and physical therapy. He told TVNewser:

“Most of my friends and family around me four years ago, would have never really thought that I would be able to do what I’m doing now. I’m very close to the way I was before.

There’s no way that you return to exactly the way you were, but there are parts of you that are better.”

Read more: Bob Woodruff’s Big Interview Just Part Of A Big Day –TVNewser

Previously: Once Seriously Injured In Iraq, Woodruff Returns

Atlantic Editor On Pay Walls: “Can’t Afford To Be Ideological”

atlantic-fiction-kindle-foil-top-9ac64f._V209599393_.gif

Last night The Atlantic hosted a discussion titled “Money, Media, and the Future of HBO” with network co-president Richard Plepler and the magazine’s Jeffrey Goldberg. Also on hand were Michael Hirschorn, Stephen Colvin of The Daily Beast, and Senator Michael Bennet.

Plepler discussed the success of HBOGo, which allows subscribers to view their favorite episodes of Entourage or True Blood from any computer, and eventually on portable devices like the iPad or Blackberry. The theme of the evening seemed to be, “Piracy will always be an issue, but people will always pay for quality.”

Looking to expand this theory to print publications, FishbowlNY talked to Atlantic editor James Bennet. The magazine was one of the earliest users of a pay wall on its Web site, but like The New York Times, it eventually took it down in 2008 to allow readers to view the content for free. Now that the Times is planning on charging again, would Bennet’s magazine follow suit?

“It’s an idea we’re constantly revisiting,” Bennet told us. “But we can’t afford to be ideological about it. The New York Times‘ announcement does not affect our decision at all.” The magazine has no current plans to reinstate a pay system, he added.

When asked how The Atlantic plans to monetize in new media, Bennet pointed to The Atlantic Fiction For Kindle, created exclusively for the e-reader, which provides a series of never-before-published fiction for $3.99 a month. This is one of the few genuinely novel ideas we’ve heard about in terms of regulating content. Since it’s virtually impossible to copy and disseminate (unless you feel like all that retyping), and since it’s an original product (unlike news, which users can get from a variety of sources), it may be one of the few types of word-based media people will still shell out money for.

Previously: So What Do You Do James Bennet, Editor of The Atlantic?, The Atlantic Tears Down Their Paywall

Jimmy Kimmel Answers Jay Leno’s ‘Sucker Punched’ Allegation

Jimmy Kimmel explains his performance on Jay Leno‘s show. “What they didn’t understand is I like beating things to death.”

Apparently Jay went and whined to Oprah that Kimmel “sucker punched” him.

Now how did Kimmel get involved in this late night dramedy?

Via Huffpo

Previously on FBLA:

  • Jimmy Kimmel Does His Entire Show as Jay Leno
  • The 2004 Clip of Leno Explaining What Will Happen in Five Years
  • The Tri-Coastal Coco Protests
  • Reddit Alien: We Are All Conan
  • Conan: I Won’t Do the Tonight Show at 12:05
  • Conan Rants About Being Jerked Around
  • Leno Rants About Cancellation
  • Breaking on TMZ: Leno is Going Back to 11:30

  • FBLA’s Top 5 Stories Yesterday

    Times Appoints Execs To Oversee Pay Wall

    nytimescom.jpgIn advance of its introduction of a pay wall on its Web site next year, The New York Times has restructured the jobs of a handful of executives today. These vice presidents, which include Paul Smurl, Eliot Pierce and Nick Ascheim, will oversee the creation and implementation of the Times metered pay wall model, set to debut in 2011.

    Smurl, currently a VP of advertising, has been appointed to the newly created position of VP of NYTimes.com paid products. Pierce, VP of operations and strategy for NYTimes.com, has been named VP of advertising and digital strategy, business development and ad operations. And Ascheim, who’s currently the VP of product management for NYTimes.com is taking on the few role of VP of new ventures for the Web site. All three will be reporting to Denise Warren, senior VP and chief advertising officer of The New York Times Media Group and general manager of the NYTimes.com.

    In addition, Ira Silberstein, who currently overseeing classifieds, is being named VP of product management and classifieds for NYTimes.com and VP of digital production for the site Rob Larson is becoming VP of search products.

    Full release, explaining what all these new titles actually mean, after the jump

    Previously: NYTimes.com Pay Wall: Media CEOs, Editors And Bloggers Weigh In

    Read more

    Hip or Homeless? New Silver Lake Based ‘Reality’ Show?

    Above is a video by Emily Braken featuring comedian Robin Reiser trying to figure out who’s homeless and who’s just hip. But the always fun, Curbed LA caught this ad on Craigslist:

    A new Reality Show is casting Silver Lake’s rich, wealthy, hipster GUYS and GIRLS 21-30 whose personal style is homeless chic: Guys with beards, ratty hair and raggedy yet stylish clothing – and Girls dressed in fashionable, vintage hippie-type garb accessorized with large sunglasses and oversized tote bags. You must be incredibly involved in the Silver Lake social scene, enjoy a sensational nightlife Silver Lake style and be very outspoken with a vivacious personality. You must also hang with a racially diverse, intriguing group of friends who all live in Silver Lake.” The show sounds like it’ll be The Hills: Slightly Farther East, but we’re still crossing our fingers for a Jersey Shore: Way Farther West.

    Just what we want on our teevee more greasy hipster dandruff.

    Kudos to Reiser and Braken for calling it last year.

    East West Founder Mulls Future

    eastwest.jpgWhen we spoke with East West founder and editor-in-chief Anita Malik last year, she seemed excited about the prospect of relaunching her pan-Asian American magazine after a nearly two-year hiatus.

    But now, five months later, Malik is telling a new story. In a series of posts on her blog, Glossy On The Outside, Malik has revealed that she is seriously questioning whether there is a future for East West. “From the start, beginning back to 2003, this magazine — whether it was online, then print and online, then hiatus, and then back to test the financial landscape — has defined my identity,” she wrote last week. “But with this latest test run, our emergence from hiatus to gauge the economy, I feel differently.”

    She continued:

    “My heart isn’t in it like it used to be. In good times and in bad, this is a hard industry. It requires 150 percent, and in the case of East West, even more of me. We are extremely small and this time around even leaner. How much can one person or even two do? At what cost — financially, mentally and emotionally? These are the questions I’ve been asking myself of late. Questions without definite answers.”

    Malik is reaching out the magazine’s readers for their advice and thoughts on where East West should go. Should it go quarterly? Should it become online-only? Should it become reader-supported? Malik seems to be leaning towards scrapping the whole project or going the nonprofit route, writing yesterday, “We won’t go quarterly,” even though a majority of respondents to a poll said that’s what they would want.

    We asked Malik to explain a little of what she’s going through right now. Her answers, after the jump.

    Read more

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