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Archives: December 2012

Hollywood’s Favorite Diner Gets Another Web Shout Out

In the summer of 2010, LA freelance video editor Matthew Freund put together a mash-up of the many different film and TV scenes shot at downtown LA’s Quality Cafe. The piece got some nice pick-up at Gawker, Huffington Post and elsewhere, educating a legion of readers about just how ubiquitous this shooting location had become.


A cracked.com contributor decided it was time for a refresher this past Friday and judging by the millions of page views registered for “6 Places You’ll Recognize from the Background of Every Movie,” it was a good call. The West 7th Street establishment once doubled as both a diner and shooting location, but in recent years it has been used exclusively for filming. It ranks sixth on the Cracked countdown of all-purpose filming locales, followed by Vasquez Rocks and more.

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Most Popular FishbowlNY Stories of 2012

Here are the most popular FishbowlNY stories of 2012. As you can see, you all were very interested in the White House, Osama Bin Laden, and people getting fired. Hey, we’re not judging, we’re just happy you’re reading.

Have a safe and happy New Year’s Eve. We’ll be back Wednesday.

1) The New York Times Adjusts Printing on The Fly
2) White House Adds New Position to Deal with Unfavorable Online Media
3) How Photos from Obama’s Speech on Bin Laden’s Death Were Staged
4) Disney Trademarks ‘Seal Team 6′
5) ‘Wasn’t a Surprise’ for Ousted Early Show Host Chris Wragge
6) Fred Imus, Brother of Don Imus, Dies at 69
7) Traffic Report Jill Nicolini Leaves WPIX, Heads for WYNW
8) Psychology Today Pulls Offensive Article on Black Women from Website
9) Steve Malzberg Out at WOR, Replaced By Former Governor David Paterson
10) Toni Braxton and Sisters Debut WEtv Reality Show

[Image via Flickr - Stockerre]

The Morning Time | Less Filters | App War

TVNewser: The “When will Robin Roberts return to GMA?” articles are increasing. One great thing to arise from all the coverage? We learned that Roberts was just reunited with her dog.

AppNewser: Instagram usage has declined which means… Nothing, really. Unless you work at Instagram.

AllFacebook: Mafia Wars was the top Facebook app in 2012, which is just another reason to use Facebook less in 2013.

Media Stocks Outperform Other Industries in 2012

We know that you come to FishbowlNY for investing advice, so please heed our words for next year: Buy low, sell high and never, ever, login to your Scottrade account after three scotches. With those 2013 pearls of wisdom aside, let’s take a look at how media stocks did this year.

MediaPost reports that the media industry did quite well. The Dow Jones U.S. Broadcasting and Entertainment Index was up 40 percent compared to last year, as a number of media companies saw gains. By comparison, the Dow Jones Industry Index was up only 6.7 percent.

Comcast, Time Warner and News Corp. all saw improvements over 2011, with jumps of 54, 52 and 47 percent, respectively.

From KTNQ-KLVE Receptionist to 2012 ‘Executive of the Year’

A rousing radio rags-to-riches story is being celebrated on the cover of the January 7 issue of Radio Ink magazine. Earning the trade publication’s 2012 “Executive of the Year” honors is Univision Radio president Jose Valle (pictured):

Valle, who started out as a receptionist at KTNQ [1020 AM] and KLVE [107.5 FM] in Los Angeles, is now responsible for 70 radio stations in 16 of the top U.S. Hispanic markets and five stations in Puerto Rico, leading 1,100 Univision employees. And among the stations Valle now runs are KTNQ and KLVE, where he once answered the phones.

Valle joined Univision in 2010 after serving as president and general manager of flagship Telemundo TV station KVEA and overseeing LA’s Spanish-language independent KWHY station. Prior to that, he was VP/GM with of KXTX-TV Dallas.

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Marking New Year’s Eve at Times Square Without Dick Clark

The world is poised to celebrate another New Year’s Eve in Times Square. But this one will be unlike any in the last forty years, as there will be no Dick Clark preceding over the all-important ball drop.

Clark died in April at the age of 82. He suffered a massive heart attack, and was dealing with the complications from a stroke since 2004.

For the majority of his decades in the business, Clark’s boyish looks kept his title “Oldest Living Teenager” intact. He was synonymous with New Year’s Eve since creating his Rockin’ Eve special to usher in 1973. He marked his 40th anniversary with the holiday program just months before his death.

The show must go on, as New Year’s Eve goes on without Clark, and his beloved show continues his legacy and to bear his name.

In recent years, tourists or anyone else venturing to the Times Square Visitors Center, or online, were asked to write notes to help ring in the New Year that would be used as confetti.

This year, people are encouraged to leave fond farewells to Clark.

Tim Tompkins, Times Square Alliance president, says approximately 400 messages were left for the broadcasting icon. Those hand-written notes came from people from as far as away as Fiji and Yemen. Overall, they receive thousands of well-wishers year-round on various topics.

Tompkins tells FishbowlNY that Clark played a major psychological role when New York needed it most.

“For many decades, this was one of the few positive images that went out to the rest of the country of New York City and Times Square, Tompkins says. “This is the time you had Midnight Cowboy, you had Taxi Driver.” Read more

Out of Bankruptcy, Tribune Company Plans to Sell Pretty Much Everything

Anyone want to buy a newspaper? How about a TV station? Or maybe you’re more of a web fan, in which case careerbuilder.com might interest you. Either way, if you’re a media mogul with deep pockets, The Tribune Company has something for you.

The company has just emerged from bankruptcy with a new board, and they’re planning a fire sale. According to the Chicago Tribune, the Tribune Company wants to sell its eight newspapers, 23 TV stations and various sites, like Career Builder.

The papers — which include heavyweights like the Tribune and The Los Angeles Times — are only valued at about $623 million total. The TV stations and web properties — including WPIX and national cable channel WGN — are worth much more; at about $2.85 billion.

Somewhere, Rupert Murdoch, Michael Bloomberg and Warren Buffett are counting up the change in their respective piggy banks.

News Corp. Buys Cleveland Sports Channel for $230 Million

We first heard about News Corp. purchasing SportsTime Ohio early this month, and now the deal is officially done. According to Reuters, News Corp. bought the regional sports network for about $230 million.

The network broadcasts Cleveland Indians and Cleveland Browns games, as well as local college and high school sports.

As part of a separate deal, News Corp. is going to pay the Indians $40 million per season for the next 10 seasons for the rights to broadcast their games. That’s a lot of money for a mediocre team. Sorry Clevelanders!

FishbowlNY Newsstand: Your Morning at a Glance

It’s Official: Tribune Company Emerges from Bankruptcy

Reuters reporters Ronald Grover and Liana B. Baker had the scoop last Friday about New Year’s Eve being the day LA Times parent company Tribune Co. would finally, officially emerge from a four-year bankruptcy. This morning at 4:42 a.m. PT, LAT reporters Walter Hamilton and Joe Flint added circumspect confirmation in the paper’s own pages:

The company sought Bankruptcy Court protection in December 2008 after an $8.2 billion leveraged buyout by real estate magnate Sam Zell saddled the company with $12.9 billion in total debt just as advertising revenue was collapsing…

Despite the financial travails of the newspaper industry, Tribune remained profitable throughout the bankruptcy. It built cash reserves of more than $2.5 billion as of November 18, according to a U.S. Bankruptcy Court filing this month.

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