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New York Times Debates Pros and Cons of Comic-Con

What to make of the upcoming absence from Comic-Con 2011 in San Diego of Warner Bros., Disney, Dreamworks, The Weinstein Co., and possibly even Marvel Entertainment? That’s the question New York Times reporters Brooks Barnes and Michael Cieply tackled in a Sunday piece bound to be chewed over today by a thousand and one movie blogs.

Thanks to the ridiculously high expectations of attendees and this group’s ability to go ape on social media about any disappointment with previewed blockbuster and comic book movie elements, Comic-Con has become an extremely tricky PR proposition. The reporters wonder whether the absence of some of the big studios has anything to do with last year’s push-and-pull, which overwhelmed Sucker Punch, TRON: Legacy, Buried, and a certain Michael Cera flick:

Scott Pilgrim vs. the World was the big alarm. That Universal movie was the belle of last year’s convention, and the studio spent heavily to make it so, draping the entire side of a skyscraper with an ad, for instance. Released just three weeks after the convention, Scott Pilgrim fizzled and the $60 million movie sold just $32 million in tickets.

As a funny footnote to the very fan frenzy being reported on, many Twighlight-ers went tweet-happy about one particular paragraph towards the end of the article that mentioned there will be a Breaking Dawn panel at next month’s Comic-Con.

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