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NY Times Refuses to Endorse Cuomo

Andrew Cuomo GThe New York Times doesn’t care for either candidate in next month’s Democratic primary. The Times’ editorial board explained that it wasn’t endorsing a candidate because Andrew Cuomo hadn’t done enough to stop corruption, and his rival, Zephyr Teachout, doesn’t have the experience required.

As for Cuomo, the Times said that his first campaign promise was to “clean up Albany,” and he failed miserably:

Mr. Cuomo became governor on that platform and recorded several impressive achievements, but he failed to perform Job 1. The state government remains as subservient to big money as ever, and Mr. Cuomo resisted and even shut down opportunities to fix it. Because he broke his most important promise, we have decided not to make an endorsement for the Democratic primary on Sept. 9.

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So What Do You Do, Rina Stone, Creative Director at InStyle?

Rina-StoneAs creative director of InStyle since 2007, Rina Stone has seen her purview expand from the pages of a magazine to an entire brand universe that now encompasses everything from apps to stilettos (created as part of an ongoing collaboration with Nine West). And the hot-off-the-presses September issue is an even bigger deal than usual this year, as its 700+ pages celebrate not only fall fashion but 20 years of InStyle‘s signature inspirational yet attainable approach. As for how she balances multiple projects and tasks, Stone is quick to credit her fellow InStylers. “None of this work would be possible without the huge contribution of the many talented art directors, designers and photo editors on my team,” says Stone. “They can switch gears in an instant from a magazine feature to a digital mini book to — believe it or not — a behind-the-scenes video. They rock!” Fashionably speaking, agility is the new black. Read more

FishbowlNY Newsstand: Your Morning at a Glance

Morning Media Newsfeed: Emmys Post Strong Ratings | Pew Reports on ‘Spiral of Silence’

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NBC’s Emmys Drop From Last Year But Dominate on New Night (LA Times / Company Town)
Held on a Monday for the first time since 1976, the 66th Annual Primetime Emmy Awards won the night in viewers, according to Nielsen ratings. Down in total viewership from last year, the three-hour ceremony drew in 15.6 million viewers. Deadline Hollywood It was behind only last year’s 17.8 million, which had benefited from a Sunday scheduling, a September airdate and a high-rated NFL lead-in. On the other hand, that CBS Emmycast had to compete against a highly rated NBC Sunday Night Football game (Chicago/Pittsburgh), which averaged 20.5 million viewers and a 7.7 rating in the demo. AllFacebook Roughly 6.2 million Facebook users weighed in on the Emmy Awards Monday night, leading to 10.9 million interactions on the social network, according to Facebook data analyst Betsy Williams. Lost Remote For the past week, the social conversation has centered on the VMAs and Emmys, which aired on back-to-back nights. But which awards show captured the attention (and engagement) of Facebook users? Sunday night’s VMAs saw 13 million people with more than 30 million interactions; 6.2 million people had 10.9 million interactions related to the Emmy Awards Monday night. GalleyCat Grammy Award winner Weird Al Yankovic requested that author George R.R. Martin “type as fast as you can.” Yankovic reasoned that “we need more script.” Yankovic performed a medley of TV theme music at the Emmy Awards. As he was singing the Game of Thrones portion, comedian Andy Samberg (donning a costume of character Joffrey Baratheon) handed Martin a typewriter.

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Bronx Documentary Center to Host James Foley Fundraiser

The Bronx Documentary Center had a long history with the late James Foley. The slain journalist attended the organization’s Reporters Instructed in Saving Colleagues (RISC) class and became a good friend there to many.

He also, through the center, took an active role in helping the family of Anton Hammerl, a South African freelance photographer who was killed in Libya in 2011. From a blog post by center director Mike Kamber:

James took the initiative to raise money for Hammerl’s family. The result: $135,000 for Anton’s childrens’ education and care. Many lament terrible events; James took action to make the world a better place… James changed the world in positive ways and was an immeasurably braver and more decent man than those who took his life.

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Rough Times | Long Video | Nice Try

TVNewser: The news for Turner employees just keeps getting worse. The company is offering buyouts and says that “additional reductions in staffing” are coming.

InsideFacebook: Instagram has launched a time lapse video app titled Hyperlapse. Yes, you can shoot yourself eating lunch with it.

PRNewser: Pamela Anderson is trying her best to ruin the ALS ice bucket challenge.

NYT USTA Investigation Continues to Reverberate

In case you missed it, there was a very good bit of U.S. Open-timed investigative journalism published Saturday in the New York Times.

USTALogo

Article authors Mary Pilon and Andrew W. Lehren found much evidence to support the headline “A Tennis Board Woven with Conflicts.” Starting with the fact that Jeff Williams, publisher of Tennis Media Company (Tennis magazine, tennis.com), sits on the United States Tennis Association (USTA) board and boasts, through his firm, the organization’s largest outside-contractor relationship.

In the article comments, Mark in Albuquerque, Raymond in Washington, D.C. and a number of other readers congratulate the paper for this investigative piece. Others bring up related USTA experiences and issues.

Today, it is the turn of Nonprofit Quaterly to chime in. Columnist Rick Cohen confirms the observation in the NYT article that non-profit USTA has not exactly been forthright about all this:

We examined the USTA’s 2012 Form 990 to note that that the conflicts of interest described in the New York Times article are generally not indicated on the form, the non-employee board members are all paid for their board service (between $6,000 and $26,000), and the executive director, Gordon Smith, pulled in compensation of $1,136,722 plus an additional $140,773 for service to related organizations).

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New York Review of Books Issues Retraction

MartinFillerNYRBHedA defamation lawsuit filed last week by world-renowned London-based architect Zaha Hadid certainly got the defendants’ attention. On Monday, the New York Review of Books posted a letter from article author Martin Filler. It reads:

In my review of Rowan Moore’s Why We Build: Power and Desire in Architecture [NYRB, June 5], I quoted comments by the architect Zaha Hadid, who designed the Al Wakrah stadium in Qatar, when she was asked in London in February 2014 about revelations a week earlier in The Guardian that hundreds of migrant laborers had died while working on construction projects in Qatar. I wrote that an “estimated one thousand laborers… have perished while constructing her project thus far.”

However, work did not begin on the site for the Al Wakrah stadium until two months after Ms. Hadid made those comments; and construction is not scheduled to begin until 2015. There have been no worker deaths on the Al Wakrah project and Ms. Hadid’s comments about Qatar that I quoted in the review had nothing to do with the Al Wakrah site or any of her projects.

I regret the error.

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A Scientific Journal Goes Down the Tubes

ExperimentalClinicalCardiologyCoverNew York-based magazine The Scientist has brought to our attention a reminder of just how widespread the corrosion of the print world has become.

Per their pick-up of a recent Ottawa Citizen investigation, Toronto-born publication Experimental & Clinical Cardiology was sold in 2013 by Pulsus Publishing Group to some individuals based in NYC. Those buyers apparently quickly flipped the magazine to new proprietors and the rest is sordid history:

The new owners claim to be in Switzerland, but according to the Citizen, contributor payments are routed to a bank in Turks and Caicos. “We don’t have a clue who these people are,” [former publisher Robert] Kalina told the paper. “It is very sad.”

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The 2014 Online Journalism Award Finalists

The Online News Association has announced the 2014 finalists for its Online Journalism Awards. The awards honor a variety of categories, including investigative journalism, data journalism, visual digital storytelling, general excellence, public service and more.

The winners will be announced at a ceremony on Saturday, Sept. 27, in Chicago. Congrats to everyone. Below are just a few of the nominees. Click through for the entire list.

FEATURE, LARGE

GENERAL EXCELLENCE IN ONLINE JOURNALISM, MEDIUM

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