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Scientific American Introduces New Features And Look

Cover October 2010_9.22.10.jpgScientific American is introducing some changes both online and in the October print issue, which hits newsstands today. Readers can now browse new sections on the magazine’s site as well as make use of its enhanced navigation features.

Editor in chief Mariette DiChristina discusses the changes in her editor’s introduction to the October issue: “With this issue, Scientific American introduces the latest design and content adjustments in its 165-year history, ready to embrace the next 165.”

The changes were tested using both propriety research companies and its own audience panel made up of some 16,000 current and potential readers. The magazine learned that readers appreciated feature articles and collaborations with scientists. As such, Scientific American is introducing several in-depth and shorter pieces and new sections including “Forum” — which provides a platform for external experts to comment on science policy — and “Science Agenda,” where the board of editors can wax poetic on science issues.

Also new to the October issue are its “The Science of Health” and “TechnoFiles” columns. The former is edited by Time magazine’s former senior health and medicine writer, Christine Gorman, and the latter is written by David Pogue of The New York Times. “Graphic Science” will introduce monthly informational graphics and “Advances” provides a news roundup in print, while “Today’s Science Agenda” will act as its online equivalent, updated daily.

Design-wise, the print issue will feature a cleaner, more streamlined look courtesy of media designer Roger Black. Scientific American worked with Affinnova, using their extensive knowledge of algorithms to create a dynamic — and high-testing — cover design.

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