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Sunday Calendar Scoreboard

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FBLA was eagerly awaiting the new features in the LA Times Sunday Calendar section. We’d had a little fun when these goodies were announced, and now, we’re checking to see how close we came.

The Performance
We predicted: inky tongue bath.
Nice piece on Hiro Nakamura.
FBLA = 0, LAT = 1

The Monitor
We predicted: imitation TWOP recap.
Dull, over-long analysis of The O.C.
FBLA = 1, LAT = 1


The Smart List
We predicted: really obscure stuff.
No fair! Richard Rushfield wrote it.
FBLA = 1, LAT = 2

The Party Page
We sarcastically predicted: as good as a gossip column.
Parade has a better gossip section.
FBLA = 2, LAT = 2

Heard on the Blogs
We predicted: writing about writing
WTF?–urls in the print edition, no active links on-line.
FBLA = 3, LAT = 2

Drive By
We predicted: praise for ugly buildings
Should be a photo essay, but isn’t. No story, lots of facts.
FBLA = 4, LAT = 2

We win. And considering how lame Heard on the Blogs is, we really deserve another point.

We didn’t forecast anything for the new How’d They Do That? section, and maybe it’s just as well. Sheila Crabtree, who left the Hollywood Reporter, explains a 15 minute long tracking shot in the new film Children of Men. She describes it pretty well, but writing about a film sequence that few, if any, readers have ever seen and thus, can’t easily visualize, is like doing magic tricks on the radio. And to make things worse, the LAT on-line version didn’t even link to the trailer of the film.
And while it is a great sequence, the steadicam shot in Goodfellas is still the champ.

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