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Posts Tagged ‘30 Rock’

Morning Media Newsfeed: Sawyer Steps Down | Broadcasters Beat Aereo

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Diane Sawyer Leaving ABC World News, David Muir Takes Over as Anchor And Managing Editor (TVNewser)
ABC’s Diane Sawyer is stepping down from anchoring World News and will focus on primetime specials, big interviews, and enterprise reporting for the network. David Muir, who has been sole anchor of the World News weekend editions since 2011, will take over as anchor and managing editor of the flagship broadcast on Sept. 2. FishbowlDC In his new role, Muir will no longer anchor World News on Saturdays and Sundays but will remain co-anchor of 20/20 with Elizabeth Vargas. In addition to the new roles for Sawyer and Muir, George Stephanopoulos, anchor of Good Morning America and This Week, has been promoted to chief anchor of ABC News. TVNewser Sawyer has been anchor since 2009. She came in following the retirement of Charles Gibson who, in 2006, succeeded the anchor team of Bob Woodruff and Elizabeth Vargas. Capital New York Late last year there were reports that Sawyer did not want Stephanopoulos to replace her as World News anchor, even though he was believed to have a clause in his contract assuring him the role should she step down. Stephanopoulos signed a new deal with ABC News earlier this year. Muir has long been rumored to be the favorite inside ABC to follow Sawyer. Deadline Hollywood World News won the May sweep in adults 25-54, the evening broadcast’s first sweeps victory in more than six years. Season to date, World News is up versus the same point last year in both total viewers and adults 25-54, delivering its most-watched season in five years and best news demo number in three years.

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Morning Media Newsfeed: Casey Kasem Dies at 82 | FCC to Investigate Netflix Dispute

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Casey Kasem, Wholesome Voice of Pop Radio, Dies at 82 (NYT)
Casey Kasem, a disc jockey who never claimed to love rock ’n’ roll but who built a long and lucrative career from it, creating and hosting one of radio’s most popular syndicated pop music shows, American Top 40, died on Sunday in a hospital in Gig Harbor, Wash. He was 82. Mashable Kasem had Parkinson’s disease and dementia. His children took him off life support in a Washington hospice this week. HuffPost Kasem will be remembered as the “the king of countdowns.” He was best known for his work on American Top 40, which he hosted from 1970 to 1988, and again from 1998 until 2004, when he passed the job on to Ryan Seacrest. Kasem was also a talented voice-over artist, most famously voicing Scooby-Doo’s pal, Shaggy. THR Kasem said he wanted to be the “voice of the guy next door,” and his style was to accent the positive, considering each one of the hits a major accomplishment for each act involved. He never focused on the negative, such as a big drop-off for a particular song, and remained family-friendly. His shows also tugged at the heartstrings with such elements as “Long Distance Dedications.” Variety Kemal Amin Kasem was born in Detroit to parents who were Lebanese Druze immigrants. He graduated from Wayne State University. Kasem got his start in radio during the Korean War, working for Armed Forces Radio. Kasem was inducted into the National Association of Broadcasters Hall of Fame in 1985 and the National Radio Hall of Fame in 1992.

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On The Menu: Taking A Look Back At The Year In Media Jobs

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The Primetime Emmys were the biggest news of the day on today’s media- bistro.com Morning Media Menu podcast, along with talk about the rapidly growing number of media jobs lost over the past year and the Google book settlement.

Hosts Jason Boog of GalleyCat and AgencySpy‘s Matt Van Hoven talked about last night’s award show and its biggest winners, “30 Rock” and “Mad Men,” two shows based in the media world of network television and advertising.

Matt and Jason also discussed today’s report in Editor & Publisher that revealed that journalists have been losing their jobs at three times the rate of the average worker. “It’s not just journalists,” who are affected by the recent recession, Matt pointed out. “It’s the entire print industry.”

According to the report, 35,885 news media jobs have been lost since September 15, 2008, with the majority — 24,511 — falling in newspaper and print journalism industry. But is this a new trend? Matt doesn’t think so. “I imagine if you look back to 2005 or 2004, you would see the trend beginning maybe back then,” he said. “Maybe on a smaller scale, but the writing is certainly on the wall for a lot of publications.”

Also discussed: why the FCC has asked a federal court judge to reject the Google books settlement and the implications of the settlement being approved or rejected.

You can listen to all the past podcasts at BlogTalkRadio.com/mediabistro and call in at 646-929-0321.

Page Six’s Paula Froelich On Her Novel’s Inspiration: “All Three Main Characters Are A Part Of Me”

mercury.pngLast night, we hit the ritzy party celebrating the launch of Page Six deputy editor Paula Froelich‘s first novel, “Mercury in Retrograde.” The party, hosted by Estee Lauder exec John Demsey in his sprawling Upper East Side townhouse, was filled with Froelich’s friends like Cosmopolitan editor Kate White, “Today” show host Hoda Kotb, actress Katrina Bowden from “30 Rock,” former Fishbowlers Rachel Sklar and Glynnis MacNicol and Froelich’s latest Page Six co-worker Neel Shah. We offered Paula congratulations amid the free-flowing rose and bacon and peanut butter hors d’ouevres but caught up with her today via email to get some insight on “Mercury.”

“I wrote a novel because — well, I’ve always been a good story teller and thought, if I can write the way I talk: it’ll be amazing!” she told FishbowlNY. “I just wanted to write about women in general.”

Read on for more insight on “Mercury” from the author

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