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Posts Tagged ‘A:’

JR Moehringer On FBLA, Dana Parsons And The Movies

champ3.jpgJR Moehringer, the former LAT reporter whose story is the basis of Resurrecting The Champ, took issue with one of our posts (Actually, he called it “wrong, dead wrong, and libelous”). The post in question took issue with Dana Parsons.

Since everyone has issues, we asked Moehringer to air some of his. Instead, he send us some thoughtful responses:

Q. Did you have any say in the how the film portrays the journalist character? And did you worry that people would mix you up with the fictional journalist?

A: I had no say in how the film portrays anyone. Zero. Which was fitting, because this film isn’t my story. It uses my story as a starting point, a framework, to tell a very different story, about a very different kind of reporter.

Of course I initially hoped to have lots of say. When I first sold the story 10 years ago, I asked to write the screenplay. Studio execs said no. They already had a screenwriter in mind. Also, they knew I’d be wedded to the facts, which they felt were not conducive to high drama. Maybe they were right. Reporter on the phone for five hours? Reporter reading a book about boxing? Such scenes might please journalists, but for a movie, I guess, you need a little more pizazz. The studio felt the reporter character needed to be juiced up, and I sympathize. Ask my friends. I’m boring.

I never worried about a mix-up, because whenever I watch a film I know that “based on a true story” can mean anything. Not long ago I saw that Adam Sandler comedy, I Now Pronounce You Chuck and Larry. Someone told me it was based on a true story. I thought that claim was the funniest thing about the movie.

Also, so much about Resurrecting the Champ is obviously fictionalized. It’s based on a story by J.R. Moehringer—but the protagonist isn’t named J.R. Moehringer. I trust that sends a loud and clear message to audiences right off the bat: License has been taken, facts have been altered. Also, the newspaper where I worked, the names of my bosses and coworkers, the essentials of my bio (I don’t have a wife and son), the location of the story, even the real name of the homeless boxer —- it’s all changed. So I assume audiences understand: Hollywood equals fiction.

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“Never Say Macbeth” To Haunt Valley Film Festival

Still_18.jpgFrom the mind behind Fartman comes Never Say Macbeth, a decidedly different film about the superstitions surrounding the Bard’s Scottish play, scheduled to screen at the Valley Film Festival on 4 p.m. on Sept. 16 at the El
Portal Theatre
.

“In Never Say Macbeth, a science teacher says the word “Macbeth” in a theater and unleashes mayhem upon a Los Angeles acting troupe. This film is a cross between Waiting for Guffman and Beetlejuice,” says producer Tammy Caplan.

Caplan gives FBLA a little taste of Banquo’s feast.

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Pedro And The Watcher: Is The OC Register The Only Paper That “Gets” Blogging?

testpedro3.jpg

Maybe we’re biased (actually, we’re definitely biased), but we think the brand-spanking-new Pedro and the Watcher blog may be one of the few examples of a newspaper getting a blog right.

We love the LAT’s Homicide Report because we’re kinda ghoulish that way. And Gold Derby is often indispensable.

But we feel like a good newspaper blog should be filled with the kind of Web-only flotsam you can’t get in print.

Enter Pedro and the Watcher, the brainchild of Peter Larsen (Pedro) and TV critic Michael Hewitt (The Watcher).

The site is as fun to read as, say, Big Action!, but it’s slightly more focused — only slightly.

We’ll let Pedro explain:

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