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Posts Tagged ‘A.O. Scott’

A.O. Scott’s Uncle Eli Passes at Age 98

There’s a rather unusual video sitting towards to top of the New York Times obituary for actor Eli Wallach. Ahead of Wallach’s lifetime achievement Oscar in 2010, the actor – then 95 – welcomed grand nephew A.O. Scott to his Upper West Side apartment for a warm-hearted conversation. Wallach was Scott’s Great Uncle.

“I keep forgetting my lines,” Wallach jokes at the end of the video. “Just ad lib,” Scott replies.

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A.O. Scott Did Not Enjoy Adam Sandler’s New Movie

A.O. Scott, The New York Times’ film critic, was recently tasked with reviewing Adam Sandler’s new movie, Blended. Obviously, being that it was a Sandler film, Scott knew going in that it would be awful. Everything Sandler has ever done has been garbage (yes, that includes Happy Gilmore) and everything he ever will do will also likely be terrible. Yet Scott was blown away by how bad Blended was. Ready for some good ol’ fashioned hating? Below are some highlights from Scott’s piece.

Because life is short and I have other things to be upset about, I will not dwell on the offensive aspects of ‘Blended,’ the new Adam Sandler comedy: its retrograde gender politics; its delight in the humiliation of children; its sentimental hypocrisy about male behavior; its quasi-zoological depiction of Africans as servile, dancing, drum-playing simpletons…

That’s the opening paragraph!

…In my capacity as a film critic, I find myself more bothered by the sheer audience-insulting incompetence of the filmmaking and the writing.

Do go on.

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Hollywood Reporter Lists 35 ‘Most Powerful People in New York Media’

It’s list time! The Hollywood Reporter’s annual “most powerful people in New York media” list is out, and it features some staples (Roger Ailes) and some newcomers (Nick Denton). The list, now in its fourth year, honors “The men and women who shape the media message and interpret the sweep of the culture,” according to THR.

People love lists like this. It doesn’t really mean anything, yet everyone will be sure to humblebrag about being included. Media people love patting themselves on the back, and THR is giving them an open invitation to do so.

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HollywoodLife Aims Slingshot at New York Times, Vulture

ShutterstockPaulWalkerIt’s a  modest, unbylined attempt at Bonnie vs. media goliaths criticism. One that completely misses the mark.

HollywoodLife, four days later, is taking issue with a December 1 NYT article by Emma G. Fitzsimmons. The publication feels that no one should be chipping away, posthumously, at the Paul Walker film career.

The only problem is that neither New York Times excerpt highlighted by HL is anything close to “trashing.” The paper is simply and factually reporting on Walker’s professional trajectory, relying in part on an A.O. Scott film review.

HollywoodLife also mangles the meaning of a Vulture headline for Bilge Ebiri‘s article published Sunday. New York magazine is not reducing Walker to an “Everyman.” Rather, they were angling in on Walker’s charming and extremely rare post-Golden Age combination of an everyman’s personality with a Hollywood leading man’s good looks. They’re actually paying the late actor two separate compliments in that one, single headline.

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New York Times Magazine Original Video Series Showcases ‘Wide-Awake’ Actresses

Film critic A.O. Scott’s think piece in this Sunday’s Hollywood-focused issue of the New York Times magazine is already stirring debate. Some readers clearly do not agree with his contention that 2012 was a strong year for Hollywood movie heroines.

But what really separates the advance Web edition of this weekend’s issue from the advance print edition bundled into grocery stores and newsstands is a collection of 13 short original videos directed by photographer Tierney Gearon. Each vignette features an instantly recognizable cinematic siren engaging in some delightfully free-form artistic fancy.

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Attacking the Attacker | Pressed Down | Nice Try

Want to Cruise to the Mediterranean with NYT Journalists?

Have you ever thought: I want to go on vacation, and I want to do it with a reporter from The New York Times?

Yeah, we haven’t either.

But The New York Times is betting that someone has.

The paper, in partnership with Insight Cruises, has launched Times Journeys, an “educational travel program that connects readers and lifelong learners with Times journalists while they enjoy the pleasures of travel.”

The inaugural trip sounds like a pretty fabulous 12-night Eastern Mediterranean cruise, sailing round-trip from Venice, Italy, with stops in Montenegro, Greece, Turkey and Croatia.

And while you’re sailing the high seas:

Times journalists will engage participants in conversation and thought-provoking analysis on an expedition of seminars covering current events, film, science, music and technology.

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The New York Times Responds to Whoopi Goldberg’s Rant

Yesterday on The View, Whoopi Goldberg lost her mind when Barbara Walters brought up an article in the New York Times that seemingly left Goldberg out of a list of black actors who had won Oscars.

Goldberg lashed out at the paper, and co-host Elisabeth Hasselbeck canceled her subscription in protest. Goldberg claimed it was a travesty that the Times didn’t know she had won:

It’s hard not to take it personally. People in Somalia know; people in China know. You’re supposed to be better than this. This is not some newspaper from Hoochie-Coochie Land. Dammit, get your facts straight!

However, the piece in question, titled “Hollywood Whiteout,” by Manohla Dargis and A.O. Scott, seems to have been misread. This according to the Times, who issued a statement to Entertainment Weekly writer Ken Tucker, who covered the story early yesterday. The statement:

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