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Posts Tagged ‘Aaron Sorkin’

Aaron Sorkin’s Newsroom Trailer Is Out

The trailer for Aaron Sorkin‘s new HBO show The Newsroom is making its way across the Interwebz. Based on the two minutes above, The Atlantic calls it “Network with a Blackberry,” Gawker says Sorkin “loathes the Internet, youth” and Big Hollywood inexplicably defends the notion that gay marriage causes hurricanes.

Aaron Sorkin’s Fictional Cable Network Gets a Name: Atlantis Cable News

Our cousins over at TVNewser dug up some interesting details today on Aaron Sorkin‘s new HBO show The Newsroom–about the cable news biz. Turns out a new name has been given to the fictional network at the heart of the show: Atlantis Cable News. Sorkin’s script originally called the channel UBS in honor of the great film Network.  But for branding reasons, the change was made.

HBO has commisioned a fake news website back the new name: www.atlantiscablenews.com. The page is blank now, but TVNewser has a mock-up of the site-to-be.

The Newsroom will make its debut sometime this summer, possibly on Sunday, June 24th after the season premiere of True Blood.

Australian Politician Lifts Lines from a Michael Douglas American President Speech

Australian House of Representatives leader Anthony Albanese was just busted lifting lines from the 1995 film The American President, written by Aaron Sorkin, in a speech to the National Press Club of Australia.

Here is the part of Albanese’s speech in question:

“In Australia we have serious challenges to solve and we need serious people to solve them. Unfortunately, Tony Abbott is not the least bit interested in fixing anything. He is only interested in two things: making Australians afraid of it and telling them who’s to blame for it.”

And here’s are Sorkin’s lines delivered by Michael Douglas in the film:

“We have serious problems to solve, and we need serious people to solve them. And whatever your particular problem is, I promise you, Bob Rumson is not the least bit interested in solving it. He is interested in two things and two things only: making you afraid of it and telling you who’s to blame for it.”

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EXCLUSIVE: Getting to Know an LA Times ‘Gossip’ Queen

Our report last week about the record-breaking August numbers for LATimes.com included the rather remarkable stat of 3.5 million page views registered by the relatively new blog “Ministry of Gossip.” So we thought we’d check in with Christie D’Zurilla (pictured), the USC print journalism and chemistry major (!) who runs the site. She began her career at the Orange County Register before landing at the Times feature-entertainment copy desk in 2003.

“When we started the blog from scratch, the idea of hitting a million monthly page views seemed outrageous,” D’Zurilla tells FishbowlLA via email, “until we did it the first full month out of the gate (thanks, Tiger Woods and Adam Lambert). One of the coolest things about our August numbers and what they represent is that our readers came for a variety of stories across the board, rather than spiking on some huge scandal that broke on a holiday weekend.”

D’Zurilla, who shares the Ministry page with fellow blogger Matt Donnelly, references one of his recent items as an example of the fringe benefits that come with increased traffic. “I was the first person to hunt down and interview the Old Spice Guy, Isaiah Mustafa, in February 2010. Back then, it took eight days before anyone found the story and picked it up–even counting our LAT compadres.”

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Aaron Sorkin Whacks Web Journalism

For its latest “Media Diet” column, The Atlantic Wire caught up with Aaron Sorkin. The main takeaway is that this guy is very secure in his old school media choices.

The writer of The Social Network is famously not on Facebook and stays away from Twitter. He also abhors catch-all phrases such as “citizen journalist” and “media elite,” and has a problem with the Internet’s lack of entry barriers:

When I read the New York Times or Wall Street Journal, I know those reporters had to have cleared a very high bar to get the jobs they have. When I read a blog piece from BobsThoughts.com, Bob could be the most qualified guy in the world but I have no way of knowing that because all he had to do to get his job was set up a website–something my 10-year-old daughter has been doing for three years.

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Live from the Oscars Press Room…

Thanks to this year’s nifty Oscars.com “All Access” app (pictured), it was possible to watch winners visit the backstage press room without actually having to be in the press room, suited up in journalist formal wear. So bravo to the Academy for giving FishbowlLA the ability – from the comfort of home – to track the various reporter tactics attempted deep in the bowels of the Kodak Theater.

NPR’s Amy Walters tried to get Best Adapted Screenplay winner Aaron Sorkin to bite on a Mark Zuckerberg tease, wondering how the writer felt about his subject now. But Sorkin expertly dodged the Q-trap, commending Zuckerberg for his Saturday Night Live appearance and suggesting that no one would want to have a film made about their behavior at age 19.

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The National Society of Film Critics Tabs Social Network Best Picture

The Road to the Oscars went through Manhattan over the weekend. New York-based National Society of Film Critics chose The Social Network, the movie that chronicles the genesis of Facebook, as best picture.  

The assembled 61 critics from across the country met at Sardi’s Restaurant for their 45th annual meeting.

The group “liked” The Social Network enough to give best actor honors to Jesse Eisenberg (above). He played the emotionless Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg. The motion picture was also handed directing (David Fincher) and screenplay (Aaron Sorkin) accolades.

Italian actress Giovanna Mezzogiorno won as best actress for her role as Mussolini’s secret lover in the little known (at least in the U.S.) Vincere.

Named as supporting actor, Geoffrey Rush was honored for his turn as a speech therapist in The King’s Speech, while Olivia Williams was victorious as supporting actress for The Ghost Writer.  

True Grit was named best cinematography.

The Social Media View from Down Under

West coast freelancer Gerard Wright, via a Saturday, December 18th piece in the Sydney Morning Herald, tees off Time Magazine‘s selection of Mark Zuckerberg as Person the Year to relay some critical job seeking advice to all twentysomething non-billionaires. This holiday season and beyond, DON’T drink and status update.

Howard Rheingold, who teaches a social media class at Stanford University, has begun to notice [a resistance to sharing private life moments on social media] among his former students, now in their 20s, passed over for post-graduate positions or jobs. The reason for those failures? “Their drunken Facebook pictures,” he said in a radio interview.

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Aaron Sorkin Misses The Mark On Animal Rights

So Sarah Palin shot a caribou on her lousy reality show. Killed it, butchered it, and stuck it in her freezer. This is one of the least offensive things Palin has done during the course of her political career. And yet it has Hollywood screenwriter Aaron Sorkin up in arms. In a hilarious and widely read rant on Huffington Post, he tears into Palin for making a critter snuff film:

Like 95% of the people I know, I don’t have a visceral (look it up) problem eating meat or wearing a belt. But like absolutely everybody I know, I don’t relish the idea of torturing animals. I don’t enjoy the fact that they’re dead and I certainly don’t want to volunteer to be the one to kill them and if I were picked to be the one to kill them in some kind of Lottery-from-Hell, I wouldn’t do a little dance of joy while I was slicing the animal apart.

Well, bully for you, Mr. Sorkin. But it doesn’t much matter to a dead animal how you felt about butchering it. It’s just as dead.

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The Social Network Wins Big at The National Board of Review Awards

The Social Network is cleaning up in the early awards season. The film just won Best Film, Best Director for David Fincher, Best Screenplay for Aaron Sorkin and Best Actor for Jesse Eisenberg at The National Board of Review of Motion Pictures.

That said, despite sweeping most of the major categories, indieWIRE‘s Anne Thompson cautions against reading too much into the results as a predictor of Oscar gold.

The NBR is not always a forecaster of things to come, but rather a bellwether of where the momentum is at this moment in time. It also tends to be a bit New York-centric, and always does well by Sony Pictures Classics, which is releasing Mike Leigh’s Another Year and foreign winner Of Gods and Men.

Thompson has the rest of the winners at indieWire.

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