TVNewser FishbowlDC AgencySpy TVSpy LostRemote PRNewser SocialTimes AllFacebook 10,000 Words GalleyCat UnBeige MediaJobsDaily

Posts Tagged ‘Ad Age’

Morning Media Newsfeed: Zakaria Joins The Atlantic | The Hill Names Cusack Editor-in-Chief

Click here to receive Mediabistro’s Morning Media Newsfeed via email.

Fareed Zakaria to Join Atlantic Media as Contributing Editor (FishbowlDC)
Atlantic Media announced Monday that Fareed Zakaria will join The Atlantic and Quartz as a contributing editor in September. In this role, he will write for The Atlantic and participate in AtlanticLIVE and Quartz events. FishbowlNY Zakaria will continue his current roles as host for CNN and a columnist for The Washington Post. HuffPost “I have read The Atlantic with pleasure for three decades,” Zakaria said. “It is the best forum for ideas in the world and I’m delighted to be a part of it and Quartz.” Poynter / MediaWire Zakaria will cover “pressing world matters and culture”, and his work will appear both in the magazine and on TheAtlantic.com, according to Atlantic Media. Politico / Dylan Byers on Media Zakaria’s first event with the company will be Quartz’s The Next Billion: A Connected World conference in New York in November.

Read more

Mediabistro Course

Magazine Writing

Magazine WritingStarting September 4, learn how to get your work in top publications! You'll learn how to create captivating stories editors will want and readers will love, understand which magazines are right for your stories, craft compelling pitch letters, and more! You'll leave this class with two polished articles and corresponding pitch letters. Register now! 

Cover Battle: Bloomberg Pursuits or Ad Age

Welcome back to another edition of FishbowlNY’s weekly Cover Battle. This week features Bloomberg Pursuits taking on Ad Age. Pursuits went with a cover featuring a guy kicking around a soccer ball. Remarkably, the man doesn’t look like he’s about to fall over and feign an injury, which is usually how soccer is played.

Read more

Morning Media Newsfeed: MSNBC Disputes Report | Mashable Expands | Ad Age Cuts Issues

Click here to receive Mediabistro’s Morning Media Newsfeed via email.

MSNBC Disputes Report Rachel Maddow Influences Management, Personnel Decisions (TVNewser)
MSNBC is disputing a National Review Online report that suggests Rachel Maddow holds significant power in both network editorial vision and personnel decisions. “This is categorically false,” Rachel Maddow said. “I have never had any role in any management decision at MSNBC. Any source who says otherwise is wrong.” National Review Online Sources say it is Maddow rather than Phil Griffin who provides MSNBC’s editorial direction, and that she also holds considerable sway over personnel decisions. “I know I’m never going to get freakin’ talking points from Phil,” Maddow told The New Yorker last year. “Can you imagine? Like, what would they be?” Behind her back, colleagues call her “the queen,” a not so subtle suggestion that Maddow gets what Maddow wants. Politico / Dylan Byers on Media “The NRO story is absurd and full of inaccuracies from beginning to end,” MSNBC spokesperson Lauren Skowronski told us. The Washington Post / Erik Wemple This is awkward. You can blame Bashir for Bashir’s outrageous comments; you can blame MSNBC’s left-leaning culture; you can even blame cable television. But a more exacting review of the scripts on that November afternoon would have saved Bashir’s job as well as averted a massive credibility crisis for MSNBC. Yet here is MSNBC fighting off a report that it has acted… like a rational and responsible news organization.

Read more

Ad Age Cuts Publishing Frequency

Ad Age logo GAdvertising Age is cutting back on its publishing frequency. It’s not all bad news though. The magazine said that while it was cutting back to 25 issues per year, the minimum pages found in those issues will increase by 50 percent, as new content gets added.

“The reality is that Ad Age is now a 24-hour news service online, around the world, and so we want to evolve the magazine with content better suited for the print medium,” explained Allison Arden, Ad Age’s publisher, in a statement.

Ad Age is also revamping its website and adding a membership program that promises access to “exclusive content and events.”

In related news, Ad Age has promoted its editor, Abbey Klaassen, to associate publisher, editorial and audience.

GLAAD Takes Issue with Duck Dynasty Star’s GQ Remarks

PhilRobertsonThe PR blitz for A&E’s reality TV juggernaut continues. While things went swimmingly for this week’s Hollywood Reporter cover story, such is not the case with a GQ feature.

Per Ad Age‘s Jeanine Poggi, GLAAD is already on the case, asking A&E if it stands by Phil Robertson‘s comments in the January GQ article. Robertson damns homosexuals and other groups with a quote from Corinthians. He later makes some reprehensible remarks that bring to mind Toronto mayor Rob Ford‘s “plenty at home” statement:

“It seems like, to me, a vagina – as a man – would be more desirable than a man’s anus. That’s just me. I’m just thinking: There’s more there! She’s got more to offer. I mean, come on, dudes! You know what I’m saying? But hey, sin: It’s not logical, my man. It’s just not logical.”

Read more

Outgoing Time Inc. EIC Martha Nelson Gives Managing Editors Her Blessing

martha nelsonThere is no longer a Time Inc. editor-in-chief successor to receive the company’s symbolic, tongue-in-cheek heirloom. But that didn’t stop recently departed EIC Martha Nelson.

Per a great little item from Ad Age‘s Michael Sebastian, Nelson redirected to Time Inc. managing editors the gift of company tradition. A pair of recipients told Sebastian the framed papal memento comes with the following note:

‘This fragment comes from the ‘Pope’s Miter,’ which resided in the office of the editor in chief of Time Inc. While the miter was passed on in jest, it symbolized the earnest belief in editorial independence, truth and integrity. Now that responsibility rests in your hands.’

Read more

Ad Age Names Bon Appétit Magazine of The Year

Bon Appétit has been named Ad Age’s Magazine of The Year. Ad Age ties the magazine’s dominance directly to editor-in-chief Adam Rapoport and Pamela Drucker Mann, Bon Appétit’s VP/publisher:

This year, the magazine’s ad pages through October have increased 21% from the period a year earlier, according to the Media Information Newsletter, with much of its new business coming from non-endemic clients such as Chanel, BMW and Chase. That has helped the magazine turn in some of its thickest issues in the last six years.

Rapoport said that the secret to success wasn’t just his and Drucker Mann’s leadership. In fact, creating a good magazine was simple. ”It’s about working your tail off and producing great content,” said Rapoport.

Drucker Mann was a bit less humble than Rapoport when describing Bon Appétit. ”We’re not just following the food trends,” she told Ad Age. “We’re making the food trends.”

As Drake would say, oh you fancy huh.

Ad Age Takes a Gander at the Website That ‘Ate the News’

You’ve got to love a list that starts off with gloves-off comments from executives at a pair of very recognizable media brands. Crowning Michael Sebastian‘s compilation of ten surprising things about UK behemoth Mail Online is the relayed observation that the UK/U.S. operation considers itself the antithesis of BuzzFeed:

BuzzFeed is about viral content, something MailOnline certainly appreciates, said Martin Clarke, publisher of MailOnline.”But really what we’re about is the big homepage,” he said. “We do stories that we think are going to work on our home page, which is why we don’t do ’31 Things To Do Before Breakfast.’”

(BuzzFeed editor-in-chief Ben Smith defended the site’s emphasis on social media. “He’s right that we’re doing opposite things: we’re trying to create great content that people are proud, not embarrassed, to share,” he said in a statement.)

Read more

Harvey Weinstein, David Zinczenko and Peggy Siegal Throws Another Party

1003_mockup.gif‘Tis the season for power lunches disguised as holiday celebrations, and this afternoon at Michael’s it was SRO as the moguls (Harvey Weinstein, Tommy Mottola), a perennial party giver (Peggy Siegal and her indefatigable minions) and boldface names (Star Jones, Muffie Potter Aston) poured into the dining room for one head-spinning scene. While Bonnie Fuller and company shoe-horned 14 people comfortably into Table One, Peggy presided over a lunch for 34 in the Garden Room honoring “The Untouchables.” (Although I didn’t see them, I did spot — I think — Malcolm Gladwell and Stu Zakim in the crowd). The rest of the dining room was full of table hoppers and gladhanders — Harvey Weinstein works a room like nobody’s business — and I noticed there was plenty of glasses of red and white wine all around. Cheers!

I was joined today by Anne Fulenwider who has plenty to celebrate these days having  “come home” to Marie Claire in September. She was tapped for the top job after Joanna Coles departed for Cosmo when Kate White left to write her best sellers full-time. I know, you need a score card for all this, but do try to keep up. Anne’s extraordinary rise to the top of the masthead is a master class on how to succeed in publishing by being very smart, working hard and staying grounded amid all the glitz and glamour (yes, to civilians and the uninitiated this is a glamorous business). The Harvard graduate came to New York in the mid-nineties and landed her first job in magazines working for David Lauren at Swing. An internship at The Paris Review turned into a gig as research assistant to George Plimpton when he was working on his book on Truman Capote. Anne got quite an education diving into boxes of fascinating transcripts, fact checking scores of Plimpton’s interviews and, occasionally ”chopping carrots” at his home and pitching in whenever needed. All in a day’s work.

Diane Clehane and Anne Fulenwider

When the book was done, she went on to become senior editor, moved to Vanity Fair where she was editor of the magazine’s popular “Fanfare” section, and wound up editing the work of Leslie Bennetts, Buzz Bissinger and Dominick Dunne. Except for a brief sojourn to San Francisco, she spent a decade at the magazine where, she said, she “grew up” and was “inspired” by Vanity Fair’s great reporting and writing and learned that “maintaining quality” and upholding the highest journalistic standards (“There were armies of fact checkers and researchers!”) were critical to the vitality and relevance of a successful magazine.

Read more

Ad Age Names Marie Claire Mag of The Year, Josh Tyrangiel Editor Of The Year

Ad Age has lavished praise on Marie Claire and Josh Tyrangielnaming them magazine of the year and editor of the year, respectively. Marie Claire was honored for record setting ad pages in four issues, and for expanding its reach with new products.

“With Chanel as a partner it launched the Backstage Beauty Trends iPad App and Marie Claire @Work, which debuted last year as a saddle-stitched supplement, came back in 2012 with bigger, perfect-bound issues this May and September,” explains Ad Age. Driving that success isNancy Berger CardoneMarie Claire’s publisher and Ad Age’publisher of the year.

While Marie Claire took home those honors, Tyrangiel — the editor-in-chief of Bloomberg Businessweek — has to be happy about being named editor of the year. Tyrangiel believes his writers make him and the magazine look good. “I like that we have journalists who really want to do stories that ask very difficult questions that are sometimes in conflict with the people that we cover,” said Tyrangiel.

NEXT PAGE >>