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Posts Tagged ‘Ad Age’

Ad Age Selects Vogue as 2011 Magazine of The Year

Vogue has been picked by Ad Age as its 2011 Magazine of The Year. Getting selected as the best magazine by a publication that has the eyes of a lot of advertisers is probably a good thing, so we’re betting the staffers at Vogue are celebrating. Hell, if we heard thatĀ Anna Wintour did a keg stand we wouldn’t be surprised.

The award is part of Ad Age’s annual “A List,” which celebrates titles that are, “meeting a challenge, turning things around, building new businesses or just setting a consistent editorial and business example.”

For a complete run down of the nine other magazines that made the A List and why, click the link above. The top five are after the jump.

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Bloomberg Names New Media Reporter

Edmund Lee, a Digital Media Reporter for Ad Age for the past year, is moving on to Bloomberg News. Lee tweeted that at Bloomberg he will be covering News Corporation, Time Warner and Viacom. Prior to Ad Age, Lee wrote features for WWD.

According to Lee, he starts at Bloomberg in a “a few weeks.”

Ad Age: Americans Spent 53 Million Minutes on Facebook in March

Ad Age has the stat of the week, or maybe year, today: In March, Americans spent 53 million minutes on Facebook. That adds up to about 100 years. 100 years! Reading about what people you don’t even like are doing!

Ad Age explains that this breaks down to about 12 minutes a day per user, and then puts that into context:

In 2009, according to Bureau of Labor Statistics, the average American spent 8.7 hours a night sleeping. Men spent just 16 minutes a day doing housework (women spent 36 minutes). Exercise? 18 minutes. Religious and spiritual activities? Nine minutes. You get the picture.

That is just sad. We live in a world where revolutions are erupting all – oh lord have mercy. Peggy just posted more pics of her in that damn bikini, like she’s something special. That girl has no shame.

Fortune Prepares Fortune500+ Web App

Fortune is taking a different route than most magazines: It’s launching a web app instead of a platform specific app. Called Fortune500+, the web app works across all Internet browsers, unlike apps that are built with something specific in mind, like an iPhone or a tablet.

Ad Age reports that Fortune500+ will launch tomorrow and offer users information on companies, such as where they rank in the 500 listing, and live headlines related to each business.

Who knows if people will actually use this, but maybe because it’s for something so specific, it will be a hit with Fortune readers. It’s worth a try.

Study: Magazine Readers Like Food

There are tons of ads in magazines, but which ones actually work? That is, which ads get consumers to go buy the stuff being advertised? Citing a study by a print advertising research firm, Ad Age says that above all, people respond the most to food ads.

The study took into account reader reaction to over 90,000 print ads, and logged which ones moved consumers to purchase the item after seeing the ad. Of course, the stats are a bit flawed because most people would take a chance at buying something that isn’t expensive, but no matter! Studies are fun.

The number one ad? This one on the right, for Kraft Natural Cheese. 86 percent of the people surveyed said that they’d get crazy and buy some cheese after seeing the ad. The rest of the top five involved either a food or a beverage, and they were all inexpensive.

Apparently we are a nation of hungry risk takers.

Entertainment Weekly’s Managing Editor Discusses iPad App

Jess Cagel, Managing Editor of Entertainment Weekly, says in an Ad Age interview that EW‘s Must List iPad app is a hit with readers because it allows them to engage in an immediate and meaningful way.

The app is a digital version of the popular Must List, which features pop culture picks from the magazine’s editors. Cagle says that magazine staffers figured out quickly that the list was the best way to go when creating their iPad app:

We felt it was really critical to leverage the capabilities of the iPad, and that’s a primary reason we decided to launch with the Must List app. It’s a popular print feature that translates extremely well to a digital platform, where users can act immediately on our recommendations with one tap. Plus, from a development perspective, it was a manageable concept for us to deliver a quality, useful experience in a very short production window.

Seems like a smart strategy for an app to us.

Cagel tells Ad Age that even though the app is in its infancy, updates are already on the way. HeĀ  also says that it’s not necessarily the biggest celebrity news that gets the most attention from readers, sometimes it’s an indie band or some obscure website.

So keep writing that blog about socks that look like presidents, you never know when your time to shine will come.

Popular Science iPad Edition Hits 10,000 Downloads

According to Ad Age, the iPad version of Popular Science is doing quite well. In February the magazine added Apple’s subscription system, and now it has over 10,000 downloads.

Gregg Hano, Vice President, Group Publisher at Bonnier Technology Group, says that no matter the numbers, the goal is always getting people to subscribe:

We’ve been averaging 10,000 to 12,000 unit sales per month almost since the beginning. Now we’re going to be above that in March. We’re inching up over that. And we look forward to continuing to see subscriptions grow. Hopefully people keep testing Popular Science on their tablets and then hopefully come back and subscribing.

As Ad Age notes, even if consumers do subscribe, Bonnier won’t know much about them. One of the issues publishers have with Apple’s system is that it doesn’t allow them to view any information about the consumers who purchase the titles. When you’re trying to sell advertising and sustain a business, this is obviously a problem.

But for now at least, it appears Apple’s system isn’t hurting. Another feather in Steve Jobs’ hat, should he ever decide to wear one.

The Daily Begins Charging Monday

FishbowlNY has always been in The Daily’s corner. We liked the hires it made and dammit, we enjoyed that story about the richest dog in South Dakota ($130 million probably buys a lot of biscuits). So we’re excited to see what happens Monday when it stops being free, and begins charging users one dollar a week to view its content.

The Daily’s Publisher, Greg Clayman, tells Ad Age that he expects it to be successful. He says that it’s the perfect app for people because it changes every day, and that its blend of serious stories with ones like the dog article are a strength:

It probably leans more toward the tabloid-y than broadsheet-y, but we want to be fun. We want to be funny. We want to be serious as well. You’re covering serious stories and breaking news and people come to you for that but they also come to you for your voice and your take on events.

Of course all this talk goes out the window Monday, when Clayman will get to find out if people really do like The Daily, or just like it now because it’s free. We’re guessing it will be fine. People pay one dollar for an app that turns an iPhone into a flashlight, and The Daily has got to be better than that.

Right?

People.com Reaches One Billion Page Views

The city looks like an ice rink thanks to the freezing rain it received overnight, and it basically snows every single day now, but the staffers at People are having a good winter.

Earlier we told you that People is the most followed magazine on Twitter, and now Ad Age is reporting that People.com reached one billion page views last month.

The site easily beat out other magazines that maintain a popular online presence, says Nat Ives of Ad Age:

Visitors to New York magazine’s site, one of magazines’ most successful digital operations, generated 69.9 million page views in January, New York said, citing Omniture. Us Weekly visitors generated 205 million page views in January, according to Us Weekly, which doesn’t use Omniture but cited Google Anlaytics data.

Prevention Names Pilates Expert Fitness Editor

B00005NIOO.01.LZZZZZZZ.jpgHere’s some early holiday cheer for the magazine industry: Rodale Inc., which holds such fitness titles as Men’s Health, Runner’s World and Bicycling magazine, has just hired one of its freelance contributors as fitness editor for Prevention magazine.

Jessica Cassity has recently worked as a freelance fitness writer for The New York Times, Fitness, Self, Shape and Weight Watchers, as well as Prevention. Previously, she was a contributing editor at Health magazine.

Cassity also co-created the Pilates instructor Web site www.pilates-pro.com and worked as Soho community leader for Lululemon, where she managed the apparel company’s community-based programs like free yoga in Bryant Park.

Full press release after the jump.

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