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Posts Tagged ‘Ad Age’

Harvey Weinstein, David Zinczenko and Peggy Siegal Throws Another Party

1003_mockup.gif‘Tis the season for power lunches disguised as holiday celebrations, and this afternoon at Michael’s it was SRO as the moguls (Harvey Weinstein, Tommy Mottola), a perennial party giver (Peggy Siegal and her indefatigable minions) and boldface names (Star Jones, Muffie Potter Aston) poured into the dining room for one head-spinning scene. While Bonnie Fuller and company shoe-horned 14 people comfortably into Table One, Peggy presided over a lunch for 34 in the Garden Room honoring “The Untouchables.” (Although I didn’t see them, I did spot — I think — Malcolm Gladwell and Stu Zakim in the crowd). The rest of the dining room was full of table hoppers and gladhanders — Harvey Weinstein works a room like nobody’s business — and I noticed there was plenty of glasses of red and white wine all around. Cheers!

I was joined today by Anne Fulenwider who has plenty to celebrate these days having  “come home” to Marie Claire in September. She was tapped for the top job after Joanna Coles departed for Cosmo when Kate White left to write her best sellers full-time. I know, you need a score card for all this, but do try to keep up. Anne’s extraordinary rise to the top of the masthead is a master class on how to succeed in publishing by being very smart, working hard and staying grounded amid all the glitz and glamour (yes, to civilians and the uninitiated this is a glamorous business). The Harvard graduate came to New York in the mid-nineties and landed her first job in magazines working for David Lauren at Swing. An internship at The Paris Review turned into a gig as research assistant to George Plimpton when he was working on his book on Truman Capote. Anne got quite an education diving into boxes of fascinating transcripts, fact checking scores of Plimpton’s interviews and, occasionally ”chopping carrots” at his home and pitching in whenever needed. All in a day’s work.

Diane Clehane and Anne Fulenwider

When the book was done, she went on to become senior editor, moved to Vanity Fair where she was editor of the magazine’s popular “Fanfare” section, and wound up editing the work of Leslie Bennetts, Buzz Bissinger and Dominick Dunne. Except for a brief sojourn to San Francisco, she spent a decade at the magazine where, she said, she “grew up” and was “inspired” by Vanity Fair’s great reporting and writing and learned that “maintaining quality” and upholding the highest journalistic standards (“There were armies of fact checkers and researchers!”) were critical to the vitality and relevance of a successful magazine.

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Ad Age Names Marie Claire Mag of The Year, Josh Tyrangiel Editor Of The Year

Ad Age has lavished praise on Marie Claire and Josh Tyrangielnaming them magazine of the year and editor of the year, respectively. Marie Claire was honored for record setting ad pages in four issues, and for expanding its reach with new products.

“With Chanel as a partner it launched the Backstage Beauty Trends iPad App and Marie Claire @Work, which debuted last year as a saddle-stitched supplement, came back in 2012 with bigger, perfect-bound issues this May and September,” explains Ad Age. Driving that success isNancy Berger CardoneMarie Claire’s publisher and Ad Age’publisher of the year.

While Marie Claire took home those honors, Tyrangiel — the editor-in-chief of Bloomberg Businessweek — has to be happy about being named editor of the year. Tyrangiel believes his writers make him and the magazine look good. “I like that we have journalists who really want to do stories that ask very difficult questions that are sometimes in conflict with the people that we cover,” said Tyrangiel.

Ad Age Revamps Print, Website

Advertising Age has given its print and online versions an update. The magazine is revamped to present a “look and feel that reflects the importance as well as the excitement of this industry,” writes Abbey Klaassen, Ad Age’s editor-in-chief.

To accomplish that goal, Ad Age has ditched jumps, and is presenting all of its content on one page, or on consecutive pages. The magazine also boasts a “companion app,” called Ad Age Interact. The app, created by Nellymoser, allows readers to simply scan articles they’re perusing to share them digitally with friends.

The new Adage.com is sleeker and cleaner, with updated fonts and easily-navigated subsections. The Opinion section has also been expanded, and there is now a Briefings section that provides all the news readers need in a quick hit format.

Ad Age Selects Vogue as 2011 Magazine of The Year

Vogue has been picked by Ad Age as its 2011 Magazine of The Year. Getting selected as the best magazine by a publication that has the eyes of a lot of advertisers is probably a good thing, so we’re betting the staffers at Vogue are celebrating. Hell, if we heard that Anna Wintour did a keg stand we wouldn’t be surprised.

The award is part of Ad Age’s annual “A List,” which celebrates titles that are, “meeting a challenge, turning things around, building new businesses or just setting a consistent editorial and business example.”

For a complete run down of the nine other magazines that made the A List and why, click the link above. The top five are after the jump.

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Bloomberg Names New Media Reporter

Edmund Lee, a Digital Media Reporter for Ad Age for the past year, is moving on to Bloomberg News. Lee tweeted that at Bloomberg he will be covering News Corporation, Time Warner and Viacom. Prior to Ad Age, Lee wrote features for WWD.

According to Lee, he starts at Bloomberg in a “a few weeks.”

Ad Age: Americans Spent 53 Million Minutes on Facebook in March

Ad Age has the stat of the week, or maybe year, today: In March, Americans spent 53 million minutes on Facebook. That adds up to about 100 years. 100 years! Reading about what people you don’t even like are doing!

Ad Age explains that this breaks down to about 12 minutes a day per user, and then puts that into context:

In 2009, according to Bureau of Labor Statistics, the average American spent 8.7 hours a night sleeping. Men spent just 16 minutes a day doing housework (women spent 36 minutes). Exercise? 18 minutes. Religious and spiritual activities? Nine minutes. You get the picture.

That is just sad. We live in a world where revolutions are erupting all – oh lord have mercy. Peggy just posted more pics of her in that damn bikini, like she’s something special. That girl has no shame.

Fortune Prepares Fortune500+ Web App

Fortune is taking a different route than most magazines: It’s launching a web app instead of a platform specific app. Called Fortune500+, the web app works across all Internet browsers, unlike apps that are built with something specific in mind, like an iPhone or a tablet.

Ad Age reports that Fortune500+ will launch tomorrow and offer users information on companies, such as where they rank in the 500 listing, and live headlines related to each business.

Who knows if people will actually use this, but maybe because it’s for something so specific, it will be a hit with Fortune readers. It’s worth a try.

Study: Magazine Readers Like Food

There are tons of ads in magazines, but which ones actually work? That is, which ads get consumers to go buy the stuff being advertised? Citing a study by a print advertising research firm, Ad Age says that above all, people respond the most to food ads.

The study took into account reader reaction to over 90,000 print ads, and logged which ones moved consumers to purchase the item after seeing the ad. Of course, the stats are a bit flawed because most people would take a chance at buying something that isn’t expensive, but no matter! Studies are fun.

The number one ad? This one on the right, for Kraft Natural Cheese. 86 percent of the people surveyed said that they’d get crazy and buy some cheese after seeing the ad. The rest of the top five involved either a food or a beverage, and they were all inexpensive.

Apparently we are a nation of hungry risk takers.

Entertainment Weekly’s Managing Editor Discusses iPad App

Jess Cagel, Managing Editor of Entertainment Weekly, says in an Ad Age interview that EW‘s Must List iPad app is a hit with readers because it allows them to engage in an immediate and meaningful way.

The app is a digital version of the popular Must List, which features pop culture picks from the magazine’s editors. Cagle says that magazine staffers figured out quickly that the list was the best way to go when creating their iPad app:

We felt it was really critical to leverage the capabilities of the iPad, and that’s a primary reason we decided to launch with the Must List app. It’s a popular print feature that translates extremely well to a digital platform, where users can act immediately on our recommendations with one tap. Plus, from a development perspective, it was a manageable concept for us to deliver a quality, useful experience in a very short production window.

Seems like a smart strategy for an app to us.

Cagel tells Ad Age that even though the app is in its infancy, updates are already on the way. He  also says that it’s not necessarily the biggest celebrity news that gets the most attention from readers, sometimes it’s an indie band or some obscure website.

So keep writing that blog about socks that look like presidents, you never know when your time to shine will come.

Popular Science iPad Edition Hits 10,000 Downloads

According to Ad Age, the iPad version of Popular Science is doing quite well. In February the magazine added Apple’s subscription system, and now it has over 10,000 downloads.

Gregg Hano, Vice President, Group Publisher at Bonnier Technology Group, says that no matter the numbers, the goal is always getting people to subscribe:

We’ve been averaging 10,000 to 12,000 unit sales per month almost since the beginning. Now we’re going to be above that in March. We’re inching up over that. And we look forward to continuing to see subscriptions grow. Hopefully people keep testing Popular Science on their tablets and then hopefully come back and subscribing.

As Ad Age notes, even if consumers do subscribe, Bonnier won’t know much about them. One of the issues publishers have with Apple’s system is that it doesn’t allow them to view any information about the consumers who purchase the titles. When you’re trying to sell advertising and sustain a business, this is obviously a problem.

But for now at least, it appears Apple’s system isn’t hurting. Another feather in Steve Jobs’ hat, should he ever decide to wear one.

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