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Posts Tagged ‘AdAge’

The Flip Side Of Newstand Losses: Accentuate The Positive!

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Yesterday was all doom and gloom for the future of print over at The New York Times, which reported an average newsstand loss in the magazine industry of 9.1 percent and an overall circulation decline of 2.2 percent from the previous year. While we floated the idea that some of the publishers that actually showed gains (Rodale and Meredith) operated in a niche market for customers, there might be even better news over at AdAge, where Nat Ives pointed out that the individual sale losses have actually slowed down in the past year. Big sellers like Cosmopolitan and Us Weekly either slowed down their decline to the single digits, or actually improved their single-copy sales, according to the Audit Bureau of Circulations. So what’s the logic behind the market? Why did Us Weekly gain 1 percent in sales while In Touch plummeted over 10 percent? And what can cause a magazine to do fare better in subscription form than single-issue, like Woman’s Day?

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Lauren Berger Writes New Book for Young People Entering "Real World"

Lauren Berger Welcome to the Real WorldCareer Expert, Lauren Berger, releases her second book, Welcome to the Real World: Finding Your Place, Perfecting Your Work, and Turning Your Job Into Your Dream Career (Harper Business), on April 22nd. In this book, Berger shares everything she wishes someone told her after graduation. Her book is the essential guide to anyone starting their first, second, or third job. She encourages readers to be fearless, step outside of their comfort zones, and go after what they want.

Palin Teabags | AP Gets New News Editor | Let Them Read ‘Papes | McCain V Palin

HuffPost Looks To Twitter Feed For New Ad Options

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Our colleagues at FishbowlLA picked up on this story via Advertising Age: The Huffington Post is offering marketers the chance to pay to post comments in the readers’ comment section of the site as well as its Twitter feed.

Although no marketers have signed on yet, this seems to signify one new way that HuffPost is seeking to make money. Does that mean writers who produce content for the site — for free — will finally get paid? As FishbowlLA said, “Yeah, start holding your breath.”

And here’s another question: if it works, will other publications follow suit? Where will ads pop up next?

HuffPo Offers Their Tweets For Sale –FishbowlLA

Huffington Post’s New Ad Revenue Stream: Twitter FeedsAdAge

Vibe Relaunches With Maybe Not The Best Cover Celebrity

VIBE_ChrisBrown_Preview.jpg When Vibe magazine shuttered back in June, there was little hope that the publication would be revived, considering the state of the magazine industry. But revived it was, acquired by a trio that included equity firm InterMedia Partners, Uptown Media Group and Blackrock Digital that together formed the new Vibe Lifestyle Network.

In late August Jermaine Hall was named editor-in-chief, a circle completed as Hall’s first job was working for the original Vibe. And he’s certainly set on making his mark: His decision to put Chris Brown on the cover for the relaunched magazine’s December issue (the new Vibe.com has already been up and running since August) is bound to stir up controversy. Brown’s ex-girlfriend Rihanna is currently doing the talk-show circuit on the physical altercation between her and Brown before the Grammys this February, and putting the convicted R&B star on the cover of Vibe can either be seen as tone-deaf and offensive, or provocative and challenging.

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Men’s Health Tries A New Way To Earn Revenue

mens health app.jpgWith ad revenues slipping in the past year, magazines have been trying to find new ways to earn money and keep their publications afloat. With its latest idea, Men’s Health might be on to something.

Using new technology only made possible with Apple Inc.’s iPhone operating system upgrade this week, the magazine has launched an iPhone application that sells additional content through the app itself.

The “Men’s Health Workouts” app, which is available for $1.99, “comes with photos, instructions and the ability to track one’s progress for 18 workouts and more than 125 exercises,” explains AdAge.com‘s Nat Ives. However, users can purchase additional workouts and other info — for as little as 99 cents.

According to Apple, this approach to apps is revolutionary, but its probably not the last time we’ll see a magazine use this new technology to sell additional content to readers and iPhone users.

Earlier this week, we spoke exclusively with Wired Editor-in-Chief Chris Anderson about new ways magazines and newspapers can monetize content. Something tells us Anderson would be very intrigued by Men’s Health‘s new model.

“It’s not about charging more for the same products, but releasing different products,” Anderson told FBNY. “[Those products] are not for everybody, but for enough people that we can charge a higher price.”

Update: In a press release today, the magazine said the app “includes 18 exclusive workouts and 125+ exercises from the world’s top strength coaches, athletes, and fitness experts. Each workout features step-by-step instructions, high-quality photos, advanced logging functions, and is powered by a one-of-kind circuit training interface.” The additional content available for purchase will be workout “expansion packs” including additional groups of workouts directly within the application itself. Available expansion packs at launch include, “The Ultimate Abs Pack,” “Build a Beach Ready Body,” and “Huge Arms in a Hurry.”

Men’s Health is leading the industry by adapting our print products to emerging digital platforms,” said David Zinczenko, the magazine’s editor-in-chief. “While other magazines have offered iPhone applications before, we are the first to embrace Apple’s In-App purchase function, and in doing so, we are the first to deviate from these traditional marketing methods. In essence, we are creating a distribution channel within the iPhone for our content.”

Fake News Of The Week

ONN2.jpgIts been a big week in fake news. First, there were rumors that The Onion was planning cut its print edition, which were quickly refuted, although the satiric pub did eventually admit that they were shutting down print operations in San Francisco and Los Angeles.

That blow to the fake news industry was counteracted by NBC’s announcement that it was planning to place half-hour “Weekend Update” shows on its fall schedule, a trick they pulled off last year by positioning it as extra election coverage. The show will be anchored by “Saturday Night Live” head writer Seth Meyers and will fill out the network’s Thursday night line-up, NBC said.

In further celebration of fake news, AdAge.com has a Q&A with Onion president and CEO Steve Hannah, who reveals that the paper’s digital side is now bringing in more than half of the company’s revenue.

“Digital is becoming a bigger chunk of our revenue than print,” Hannah said. “Print is still very strong for us. Digital, it’s not much more than half, but it’s more than half.”

Hannah also said he is looking to move the popular Onion News Network to television. With the success of fake news on TV, its possible we could see an ONN on prime time up against “Weekend Update” some time soon.

MSM Wants Google Recognition/Results

googlerithm.pngPerhaps those newspaper folks currently directing their ire at Arianna Huffington may want to reconsider their target in the hopes that she will divulge her company’s “mostly secretGoogle search-engine optimization tactics. AdAge is reporting that major media companies are pressuring Google to elevate their “expensive online content” to the top sphere of Google’s search results.

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Conde Facing Another Round of Cuts

d4de9a14b6e7a42045c1300df45d21eb.jpgLooks like the “difficult decisions” Conde Nast CEO Chuck Townsend warned about in a memo a few weeks back may be coming to pass, a number of outlets are reporting. Here’s the round-up:

AdAge is reporting that the company is planning cuts, maybe as early as this week, to the Conde Nast Media Group, which apparently handles more than 80% of the company’s revenue. The group takes “the lead on big corporate marketing programs and contracts with advertisers that buy across three or more Conde titles.”

Meanwhile the Observer quotes an insider as saying the cuts Conde made last October were “half-assed.” Furthermore, “Conde Nast publishers and editors have been told by the chairman, Si Newhouse, and the CEO, Chuck Townsend, in the past two weeks to cut yet again, the majority being told to cut 10 percent from their non-salary, discretionary budgets, according to five Conde Nast sources with direct knowledge of the budget cuts.” This to take place by the end of the month.

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Has Conde Nast Finally Seen the Internet Light?

voguenet.pngIs Conde Nast finally ready to set foot in the land called Internet? You will recall the company had a rough ride last November, all but shuttering Men’s Vogue and laying off more than three dozen staffers from CondeNet, its online division — a move which caused observers to ponder Conde’s “tortured relationship” with the Internet and habit of using its sites merely as a portal to sell more magazines. Well looks like this attitude may be getting an overhaul (and not a minute too soon!).

AdAge reports (full press release after the jump) that CondeNet is set to be eliminated altogether and that its functions (the aforementioned selling of ad space) will be consolidated, along with the rest of the company’s digital operations, under Conde Nast Digital, to be run by Sarah Chubb former president of CondeNet. Says one media buyer: “For the advertiser, this will help streamline the conversation to get the deals done in a more timely basis — one-stop shopping vs. multiple contact points.”

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More Companies Embrace the Slippery Slope of ‘Consulting’

1-Ladies-011209.jpgDan Abrams caused a bit of a stir last month when he announced he was starting the media consulting firm Abrams Research, but lately it’s beginning to look as though he might just be at the forefront of a new trend. First off is a story from AdAge about the formation by NBC of a women’s “panel” comprised of such luminaries as Maria Bartiromo, Meredith Vieira, Tori Spelling, and Susan Lyne who have been brought together to offer “marketing and general business advice to NBC Universal and its clients on how to reach women.”

The group will also blog, write and appear on air for the media company’s women-oriented properties and contribute to a quarterly newsletter, “Power of the Purse,” covering marketing to the demographic and the latest female trends. The panel will convene for the first time Feb. 10. In effect, it could become the most powerful female-focused agency in the country.

The article goes on to note that members will be able to “recuse themselves if necessary to avoid conflicts.” Meanwhile, some folks attending the CES out in Las Vegas (where our own Chris Ariens is at), appear to be taking “consulting” to an extreme.

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