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Posts Tagged ‘Adweek’

Most Popular FishbowlNY Stories for the Week

Here’s a look at what FishbowlNY stories made the most buzz this week.

  1. The New York Times‘ New iPad Website Could Mean End of Apple App, October 3
  2. Deadspin Criticizes Bleacher Report for Being Like Deadspin, October 3
  3. Bill Carey Stepping Down as WPIX News Director, Likely for Internet Startup, October 3
  4. Gawker Grabs $2 Million in Revenue in One Day, October 27
  5. Cover Battle: Time or Adweek, September 27
  6. Surprise! Deborah Needleman (left) Joins T: The New York Times Style Magazine, September 27

Keep up-to-date with the latest FishbowlNY news. Click here to sign-up for the FishbowlNY daily newsletter, bringing you our articles each afternoon directly to your inbox.

Cover Battle: Time or Adweek

Welcome back to FishbowlNY’s weekly Cover Battle. This week we have Time versus Adweek. Time’s cover, featuring a stained-glass Mitt Romney window that was created specifically for the magazine, might make Time our first repeat winner. Also, we give Romney two days before he buys that window and puts it up above his bed. Yeah, you’re right, make that one day.

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Former Village Voice Cartoonist, Stan Mack Re-Releases American Revolution Book

Before following someone on Twitter, it was all about the “hard copy.” For twenty years, Stan Mack was the cartoonist at The Village Voice with his popular comic strip, “Stan Mack’s Real Life Funnies.”

In 1994, Mack started branching out into the literary world. After dabbling in children’s books, his first major publication was born. Now 18 years later, and after writing and illustrating several books, Mack is ready to re-release that publication.

This selection is entitled Taxes, Tea Party, and Those Revolting Rebels: A History in Comics of the American Revolution. In the 1950s, Arthur Miller used the backdrop of McCarthyism as an allegory to write The Crucible about the 17th Century witchhunt.

In the same way, Mack was inspired to explore our country’s founding based on what he saw covering the riots at Tompkins Square Park in the 1980s for The Voice.

“There was something about that experience, watching the clash between the various groups and it kind of just got a little bit out of control,” Mack tells FishbowlNY. “What came out it was the beginning of a study of rights of freedom, starting at the beginning of the country.”

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Adweek’s Women’s Issue

In advance of Women’s History month in March, Adweek’s February 27 issue will focus on the spending, technological, and media habits of American women and how brands are breaking through to reach them. It’s the first in the publication’s new Demographic Series of special reports.

The issue features a handful of first-time contributors including Nancy Dubuc, president/GM of History and Lifetime Networks, Real Simple publisher Sally Preston, and Lisa BelkinHuffington Post senior columnist. They will serve as guest columnists who will riff on the dynamic of the women’s demographic as seen through their professional experiences.

Forthcoming demographic special reports are Kids (March), Tweens (June), and Men (September).

Most Popular FishbowlNY Stories for the Week

Here’s a look at what FishbowlNY stories made the most buzz this week.

  1. Anchor Jim Watkins (left) Officially Ends Association With WPIX, October 28
  2. Nick Kristof Easily Wins Twitter Spat, November 1
  3. Columbia Journalism Review Names New Editor-in-Chief, November 2
  4. Exclusive: No One Cares About Your Exclusive, November 1
  5. Rodale Splits Into Three New Groups, October 28
  6. WEMP Covers October Snowstorm in Haphazard Fashion, October 30
  7. Mark Teixeira Loves Patch, October 28
  8. Adweek Names Lisa Granatstein Managing Editor, November 2

Keep up-to-date with the latest FishbowlNY news. Click here to sign-up for the FishbowlNY daily newsletter, bringing you our articles each afternoon directly to your inbox.

Adweek Names Lisa Granatstein Managing Editor

Adweek has named Lisa Granatsein as its new Managing Editor. Granatstein comes to Adweek from Mochila, a content syndication network and platform, where she had been since 2008.

The move actually marks a return to home of sorts for Granatstein; she previously worked for Adweek’s sister title Mediaweek for over a decade.

Jim Cooper, Adweek’s Executive Editor, was happy to announce the hire. “Few in this business have Lisa’s editorial instincts and breadth of knowledge,” said Cooper. “Her wealth of experience in the media, and across platforms, will be a significant component to our commitment to top-level, comprehensive industry analysis.”

Guess What? Michael Wolff is Out at Adweek

That’s right. After all the rumors and the denying of rumors, it is now official: Michael Wolff is out at Adweek. The magazine is reporting that Jim Cooper, the Executive Editor, will oversee operations effective immediately. It appears that Wolff decided to leave, judging from his tweet (“Long goodbye done“) and his comment:

I’ve had a fantastic time at Adweek. It’s been my privilege to be part of the brilliant transformation of the magazine and site. I can’t rave enough about Adweek’s remarkable staff. I am sad to leave but sure the talent here will continue to do great things. I’m grateful to everybody at Prometheus for giving me this opportunity and this wonderful year.

In a letter to readers, Cooper said that Adweek will remain largely the same, though the overt mention of “the industry” does make us wonder if the magazine is headed back to its roots:

Now, six months into its re-launch, as media, advertising and marketing continue to experience rapid and exciting transformation, Adweek is well positioned to continue to be the leading news brand in the space. We will continue to be fast to break news, analyze that news with authority and allow the industry’s voice to be heard through the magazine’s pages and Adweek.com.

When One Michael Wolff Rumor Dies, Another is Born

Last Friday we told you that Adweek’s Michael Wolff wasn’t getting fired even though there were lots of rumors swirling that he was. Well now that the “Wolff is dead” gossip has dissipated, WWD has started a new one: Wolff isn’t being fired, but now he might quit!

An “insider” told WWD, “Michael talked to Jimmy [Finkelstein]. Jimmy said he is not firing Michael and is confident they can work out their differences. Michael seems less confident.” Dun dun dun!

The story — that Finkelstein wants Adweek to go back to its roots and Wolff wants the title to explore more — remains the same, and Wolff has never mentioned wanting to leave, but hell, why not start up another rumor? It’s certainly more exciting than the truth.

The Magazine Nominees for Adweek’s Hot List

Adweek is going to announce the winners of its annual Hot List — which celebrates the best in a variety of media — on December 5, but we got a look at some of the nominees for the magazine category early, so we thought we’d share them with you.

Yeah, it’s not a sneak peek at the winners, but it’s still sort of exciting, right? In any case, below are most of the magazines that made the cut. Head to Adweek on Monday to see what other media received nominations.

General Interest:
Time, Newsweek, Wired, Vanity Fair, The Atlantic, National Geographic, The New Yorker, New York, Reader’s Digest, Smithsonian, Harper’s, Ebony, Popular Science, PopularScience, The Week.

Travel:
Condé Nast Traveler, Nat Geo Traveler, Travel + Leisure, Departures, Budget Travel, Afar.

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Michael Wolff is Not Being Fired After All

It turns out that the rumors of Michael Wolffs demise have been greatly exaggerated. PaidContent reports that Jimmy Finkelstein, the Chairman of Adweek’s parent company, Prometheus — and supposedly the main guy behind the push to fire Wolff — supports the controversial editor.

“Michael’s name is still on the masthead,” said Finkelstein. “He’s not being fired. If I were going to fire someone, it would not be in the pages of the magazine or a news site. We do have differences, but we’re working through them to continue to build Adweek.” Finkelstein even praised Wolff for helping boost Adweek.com’s traffic since the redesign.

So basically everything that was rumored to have happened ended up not being true. And Wolff had to sit through all of it. There really is no rest for the weary.

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