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Posts Tagged ‘Al Goldstein’

Reporter Could Always Count on Al Goldstein for ‘Good Quote’

LukeAlpertTwitterProfilePicEven though, as a teen, Lukas I. Alpert (pictured) imagined that Al Goldstein “smelled a bit like the kitchen at the Second Avenue Deli,” a long, indelible partnership would follow his viewings of the Screw magazine publisher’s midnight public access show Midnight Blue.

Alpert, now a Dow Jones/Wall Street Journal reporter based in Moscow, interviewed Goldstein over the years for AP, the New York Daily News and the New York Post. Via a great little Forward Thinking remembrance, Alpert writes that Goldstein could always be counted on for a colorful interview:

Goldstein was one of those guys journalists liked to talk to because, as we say in the newspaper business, “he gave good quote.” I was pleasantly surprised that the prepared obituary I wrote for him at the AP about a decade ago ran all over the country virtually as I had written it.

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RIP: Al Goldstein

Four and a half decades ago, Screw magazine announced its arrival by means of a short manifesto. The publication’s purveyors promised to never ink out pubic hair and never apologize.

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This morning, at a hospice in Brooklyn, Al Goldstein, the co-founder and flamboyant publisher of that publication passed away at age 77. His death follows earlier, premature reports last year at this time. From this morning’s New York Times obit:

Mr. Goldstein did not invent the dirty magazine, but he was the first to present it to a wide audience without the slightest pretense of classiness or subtlety. Sex as depicted in Screw was seldom pretty, romantic or even particularly sexy. It was, primarily, a business, with consumers and suppliers like any other.

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