FishbowlDC TVNewser TVSpy LostRemote AgencySpy PRNewser GalleyCat SocialTimes

Posts Tagged ‘Al Goldstein’

Reporter Could Always Count on Al Goldstein for ‘Good Quote’

LukeAlpertTwitterProfilePicEven though, as a teen, Lukas I. Alpert (pictured) imagined that Al Goldstein “smelled a bit like the kitchen at the Second Avenue Deli,” a long, indelible partnership would follow his viewings of the Screw magazine publisher’s midnight public access show Midnight Blue.

Alpert, now a Dow Jones/Wall Street Journal reporter based in Moscow, interviewed Goldstein over the years for AP, the New York Daily News and the New York Post. Via a great little Forward Thinking remembrance, Alpert writes that Goldstein could always be counted on for a colorful interview:

Goldstein was one of those guys journalists liked to talk to because, as we say in the newspaper business, “he gave good quote.” I was pleasantly surprised that the prepared obituary I wrote for him at the AP about a decade ago ran all over the country virtually as I had written it.

Read more

Mediabistro Course

Middle Grade Novel Writing

Middle Grade Novel WritingStarting January 15, work with a literary agent to write your middle-grade novel! In this course, you'll learn how to develop strong characters, write compelling dialogue, master the art of revision, and market your work to publishing houses and agents. Register now!

RIP: Al Goldstein

Four and a half decades ago, Screw magazine announced its arrival by means of a short manifesto. The publication’s purveyors promised to never ink out pubic hair and never apologize.

ScrewBanner

This morning, at a hospice in Brooklyn, Al Goldstein, the co-founder and flamboyant publisher of that publication passed away at age 77. His death follows earlier, premature reports last year at this time. From this morning’s New York Times obit:

Mr. Goldstein did not invent the dirty magazine, but he was the first to present it to a wide audience without the slightest pretense of classiness or subtlety. Sex as depicted in Screw was seldom pretty, romantic or even particularly sexy. It was, primarily, a business, with consumers and suppliers like any other.

Read more