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Posts Tagged ‘Alissa Walker’

USC Annenberg Announces 2011 Getty Arts Journalism Fellows

USC’s Annenberg School of Journalism announced the recipients of this year’s Getty Arts Journalism Fellowhips this week. The winners are all fellowship alumni and will combine  efforts on a pop-up newsroom called Engine29. Fellows will publish work on Engine29.org during the week of Nov. 4 to 13–corresponding with the arrival of the Getty’s Pacific Standard Time: Art in L.A. 1945-1980 exhibit. Annenberg already experimented with the pop-up newsroom model earlier this year, with its Engine28 project to cover the blizzard of theater festivals that arrived in Los Angeles this summer.

Los Angeles freelancer Ariel Swartley and LA Times pop music critic Randall Roberts are LA’s representatives to the Engine29 team.

Update: Duh, GOOD’s Alissa Walker is from LA too. Sorry we missed you Alissa.

Full list of fellows after the jump.

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Mediabistro Course

Travel Writing

Travel WritingStarting September 23, learn how to turn your travel stories into published essays and articles! Taught by a former Vanity Fair staff writer, James Sturz will teach you how to report, interview, and find sources, discover story ideas and pitch them successfully, and understand what travel editors look for in a story. Register now! 

Daughter of Godfather Crooner Celebrates ‘Vintage Los Angeles’

GOOD Los Angeles editor Alissa Walker has a fun piece today about the Facebook efforts of Alison Martino, daughter of the actor (Al Martino) who played a crooner in The Godfather.

Thanks to her work on the 1998-2000 E! program Mysteries and Scandals with A.J. Benza, Martino is well-acquainted with the razed remnants of LA yesteryear. Now, she’s thrilled to be able to share that passion with the social community at large, via the Facebook page “Vintage Los Angeles.” Per the GOOD article:

She posted a photo of the infamously gaudy “Sheik’s House” in Beverly Hills, which burned down in a suspicious fire in the 1980s, and immediately got an even better photo (pictured) from a reader who spent the day sifting through his mother’s scrapbooks. “I’ve been looking for a photo of that for 20 years,” says Martino.

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Good Magazine to Launch LA-Focused ‘Local’ Project

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Yesterday, we broke the news about how Good is launching its own in-house advertising company to complement its media operations. Well, that isn’t all that folks are up to over there. During a lengthy visit to Good‘s offices last week, we spoke with LA-editor Alissa Walker and Mark Barker--who was just hired to manage yet another new company endeavor called “Good Local.”

Unlike a traditional media rollout, with a total reliance on editorial content, Good Local will combine reporting, event planning, social activism and philanthropy. “Good‘s mission has become more action-oriented,” says Walker. “We don’t just want to bring attention to problems through reporting. We want to actively encourage our community to become part of the solution.”

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Plagiarism at AOL’s West Hollywood Patch

When local blogger Alissa Walker of GelatoBaby.com discovered a portion of an obituary she had written for John Chase had been plagiarized by AOL-owned website West Hollywood Patch, she contacted the site’s editor. The Informer at LA Weekly has published the email response Walker received from Patch editor Nancy C. Rodriguez:

My calendar editor wrote the obit for me. I’ll have him update the obit … Would you mind sending me some information about John Chase…his significant role to West Hollywood, his character and any contributions to the city? It would be helpful information for our calendar editor.

Wow. The editor actually asked a writer her employee had just stolen from to do more of their work for them. No apology. No promise to correct or remove the stolen material. And apparently, no shame.

The obit was eventually taken down and the author fired. West Hollywood Patch appropriately issued an apology. But in light of new charges of plagiarism over at New Rochelle Patch, it makes us wonder if AOL made good on their promise to hire journalism professionals.

Related: Patch, the WalMart of News? by LA Weekly‘s Tibby Rothman

Sean Bonner: It’s All GOOD

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The always wonderful Alissa Walker profiles Metblogs founder Sean Bonner in the latest GOOD magazine.

Walker writes:

Bonner, along with fellow web conspirator Jason DeFillippo, hit upon the Metblogs concept five years ago, when the two men made the startling discovery that the internet offered hardly any useful local information about their hometown, Los Angeles. There was nothing to be found about the best restaurants, stores, or late-breaking local news. “The alt-weeklies and local papers were full of syndicated content,” says Bonner. “Even if it was local, there was not an actual opinion.”

Well, one of our tipsters has an opinion. The astute reader who alerted us to this profile notes the pic of Bonner:

“The photo is hilarious — hipster cred. Bike, check. Tats, check. Nerd glasses, check.”

Freelancia Implodes as Blogistan’s Borders Expand

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Recently, New York Observer ran a doom and gloom piece about the lack of freelance magazine writers. They’re all blogging. Doree Shafrir reports that it’s a harsh world out there:

For most established but not well-known writers, $2 per word at a major magazine is standard, though usually negotiable. So even if a fledgling magazine writer were to write one 1,500-word feature a month for a national magazine–which would in itself be a difficult feat to pull off–he or she would be pulling in $36,000 a year before taxes. That’s also assuming that none of the stories were killed or held and that everyone paid on time.

Luckily, Alissa Walker, former Unbeige editor, posted the perfect rejoiner:

Now, I don’t write one 1,500 feature a month. I write six or seven or eight stories a month, ranging from 300 to 2,000 words (and, ahem, I don’t always get $2 a word). Even when I was a fledgling–which, I guess, I still am–I was writing more than 1,500 words a month. That meant pitching a helluva lot more stories than I actually landed. And yes, at first, with smaller magazines, hounding people to pay me. But selling 1,500 words a month? More than do-able for a new freelancer.

Hell yes.

Jessica Wakeman, with a day job at the HuffPo, believes in web only.

Jay Busbee says no one reads magazines anyway.

Debbi Mack has our favorite Dr. Johnson witticism as her tagline.

And Daily Intelligencer points out that blogging is a stepping stone to greater things, as Ms. Shafrir knows all too well.

It only matters because the stakes are so small.

More GOOD Inside

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Jocelyn Nubel can get things done–no sooner had FBLA whined that we didn’t get a copy of GOOD, than she got someone in LA to burn precious fossil fuels to deliver one.

We’re grateful, even if the paper version off-gasses for hours. If the website was up to date, we’d have links for these selections.

Alissa Walker, of Unbeige, has a piece on Project M in rural Alabama.

Patrick James delivers a feel-good piece about Denise Cramsey, a co-EP of Extreme Makeover: Home Edition. Clearly, James bought into the “community volunteers coming together” line straight from the ABC press kit.

The best part of the mag is the back-of-the-book Provocations section. The worst part is the visual over kill in the Stimuli section–there’s so much going on, the eye just gazes right off the page and out the window.

Alissa Walker is Worth 1000 Words at Art Center

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Alissa Walker, co-editor of UnBeige, shares her expertise at a panel at ArtCenter College of DesignWorth 1000 Words: Writing About Design, Wednesday, June 27 at 7:30pm.

Watch in amazement as Walker, STEP editor Tom Biederbeck, and MIT Mediawork editorial Director Peter Lunenfeld, answer these and other questions:

What recent trends in design do you think are most relevant to design publications?

If a young graphic designer is interested in becoming a design writer or editor, what are the two most important things they should know?

We think that Jonathan Adler is the answer to that last question.