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Posts Tagged ‘Amazon.com’

Condé Nast Partners with Amazon for New Subscription Service

Condé Nast, in an attempt to streamline its subscription service, has partnered with Amazon.com. The deal involves a new service called “All Access,” which will allow consumers to buy, manage and renew their print and digital Condé subscriptions, using their Amazon account.

VogueGlamourBon AppétitLuckyGolf DigestVanity Fair and Wired are the first titles available via All Access. The remaining glossies will be added by the end of the year. To entice new subscribers, Condé is offering an introductory deal, which includes All Access to magazines for $6 or less for six months worth of issues.

While financial terms weren’t disclosed, we imagine Amazon will take a cut of the subscriptions Condé gains from All Access. Still, this is a smart move for both companies. For Condé, it brings their brands into the homes of millions of people who might not already be readers; for Amazon, it gives users yet another reason to log in. All Access is definitely all good.

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New Kindle is Bestselling Product in Amazon History

Recession? Death of print media? Amazon.com isn’t worried. The e-tailer announced today that the 3G, Wi-Fi Kindle is the website’s bestselling product ever. More people turned on new Kindles for the first time on Christmas day than any other day in the product’s history.

Amazon doesn’t release sales figures, but they did reveal other interesting numbers: On the company’s peak sales day, November 29, more than 13.7 million items were purchased from the site. That breaks down to 158 items per second, a new record for the company. Not surprisingly, “The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo” by Stieg Larsson was the most purchased and most gifted Kindle book on Christmas day. Topselling movies for the holiday season were “Inception”; “The Blind Side”; and “Toy Story 3”

But by far our favorite figure from the release is this:

For the holiday time period alone, Amazon customers bought enough copies of “Eclipse” for Edward Cullen to watch the movie 1,000 times a day for all 109 years of his life.

Thomson Reuters, MTV Make Best Global Brands List

thomson reuters.jpgWe were encouraged to see that a few media brands crept their way onto Interbrand’s list of the 100 Best Global Brands of 2009, out today.

Of course, some of the world’s biggest brands rounded out the top five: Coca-Cola, IBM, Microsoft, General Electric (which owns media brand NBC Universal) and Nokia. Google came in at number seven and Disney ranked tenth.

Global newswire brand Thomson Reuters came in at number 40. Interbrand said the company is in a strong position for future growth:

“Thomson Reuters’ continued investment in the brand and strong portfolio of flagship brands is beginning to pay dividends as the company continues to drive towards becoming one unified firm.”

Online book shopping destination and Kindle creator Amazon.com came in shortly after Thomson Reuters at number 43, MTV ranked 54 and Yahoo! came in at 64.

In its overall assessment of the media industry landscape, Interbrand said new brands will soon take over the cache of more traditional media brands:

“The media sector landscape is being redefined by non-traditional players, and is facing pressure from all sides. Technology companies such as Google, Twitter, and Facebook are entering the content creation and delivery arenas and giving users the power to dictate their means of media formation and consumption, threatening to render the old media brands obsolete.”

After the jump, more of Interbrand’s take on the media industry and the future of its biggest brands.

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On The Menu: Erin Andrews, Zappos and Lou Dobbs

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Today on the media- bistro.com Morning Media Menu podcast, hosts Jason Boog of publishing blog GalleyCat and AgencySpy‘s Matt Van Hoven talked about the day’s big media headlines.

First they talked about the ongoing Erin Andrews peephole camera scandal, and the recent news that ESPN has banned New York Post reporters from appearing on its station after the paper published fuzzy photos of Andrews on its cover earlier this week. They also talked about Amazon.com‘s acquisition of online shoe purveyor Zappos.com yesterday.

“Amazon has been hit a few times [in recent months] because they are a huge target…it’s very easy for them to make a misstep and once they make a misstep people jump on them,” Jason said. “If they are able to bring that Zappos personality and that Zappos interaction with their users I think that would be very valuable to them. If that’s why they’re doing it, I’m all for it.”

Also discussed: CNN distancing itself from Lou Dobbs.

You can listen to all the past podcasts at BlogTalkRadio.com/mediabistro and call in at 646-929-0321.

Amazon Buys Zappos|Editor: James Murdoch Approved Settlements In Cell-Tapping Scandal|How 3 Papers Handle Online Commenting|Page Six Seeks Reporter|It’s Not Too Soon To Joke About McKinsey & Conde Nast

WebNewser: Amazon.com has bought Zappos. Here’s hoping they don’t change the way the shoe purveyor does business. We really do need shoes that fast.

New York Times: An update on the News of the World cell phone hacking scandal: the tabloid’s editor told a parliamentary committee that Rupert Murdoch‘s son James approved a $1.1 million payment to settle the allegations against the paper.

MinnPost: A look at how three newspapers – the Fargo Forum, the Star Tribune in Minneapolis and the St. Paul Pioneer Press approach commenting policies for their Web sites. Interestingly, the Strib blocks comments on eight kinds of articles.

Gawker: Looks like Page Six’s Richard Johnson hasn’t found a new reporter to replace Paula Froelich yet. Any takers?

The Atlantic: Want a laugh? Have a look at some thoughts that McKinsey may have about Condé Nast, including “Is ‘A. Leibovitz’ the accounting code for a corporate jet?”

Trying To Find A Business Model That Works

IMG_1821 - Version 2.jpgLast night’s panel produced by Mediabistro.com and sponsored by Demand Studios focused on finding a business model for news on the Web but — like most panels of its kind — no real conclusions were reached.

The panel was moderated by BusinessWeek columnist Jon Fine, and featured (in photo from left to right) “rogue girl blogger” Maegan Carberry, NYU professor Jay Rosen, Mediaite.com Editor at Large Rachel Sklar and NewJerseyNewsroom.com‘s Matt Romanoski.

Moderator Fine started the panel off with some scary statics — comparing the amount of ad sales money generated by the New York Times versus the Huffington Post. The Times made over $1 billion in ad revenue last year. he said. How can an online media company compete with that?

Some suggestions were tossed around, including asking readers to pay for content. Sklar suggested that media companies should make it easy for readers to purchase access to information, replicating the “buy” button on Amazon.com or iTunes that is connected to saved credit card information. She also suggested charging for “freemium” or extra content, and said she wouldn’t mind paying a few dollars a month to use Twitter, Flickr or YouTube.

“I wouldn’t mind paying for Twitter because they I would own my Tweets if anything ever went wrong,” she said.

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FishbowlNY Poll Results: Kindle’s Too Pricey For You

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Yesterday, we asked you to tell us if you would buy a new Kindle DX. There’s been a lot of buzz about this product in the past few days (most recently the fact that it can’t correctly pronounce Barack Obama‘s name) but everyone is mostly complaining about its price and its release being so soon after the latest Kindle version, the Kindle 2. Here’s the results of our poll:

61% of you said that you would not buy a Kindle DX, although only 16% of you said you wouldn’t be buying the new version because you already have a Kindle of some kind.
29% of you said you would buy a Kindle DX.
And of the 10% that answered “other,” many of you were simply undecided and pointed to price as a major drawback. At least two people said they would consider buying a Kindle DX if the price drops.

As one respondent said, “If it was less expensive, I would buy a Kindle for books…not necessarily news.”

Is iTunes In Trouble?

jos.jpegFirst Vivendi shifted its weight away from Mr. Jobs, and now NBC is following suit. Rivals from MTV and Amazon.com, EMI and Wal-Mart are also nipping at the digital music titan’s heels.

Per Reuters: NBC decided not to renew its contract with iTunes, pulling Battlestar Gallactica and Heroes from the teeny-tiny screen and becoming the second major media company to challenge Apple.

Per the The New York Times: MTV last week said it was going to fold its digital music service into a venture with the owners of the Rhapsody, “as part of a renewed challenge to Apple’s market-leading iTunes store.”

Per the Financial Times: “NBC appears to be embracing a rival. The media group, owned by General Electric, has begun to sell digital downloads through Amazon.com, the online retailer that is gearing up to challenge iTunes.”