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Posts Tagged ‘Amy Scattergood’

LA Weekly Adopting Five-Star Restaurant Rating Scale

This seems like a no-brainer. Especially for an alt-weekly always on the lookout for additional ways to get its hooks into a readership hungry for good eats, great events and the ease of quick-scan capsule reviews.

Starting in the new year, LA Weekly will adopt a zero-through-five-stars rating scale for restaurants. As Jonathan Gold‘s 2012 replacement Besha Rodell explains, the idea took root during her whirlwind LA spring job interview and city tour with food editor Amy Scattergood:

At one restaurant, we ran into one of the city’s best-known chefs. He had no idea who I was, of course, or why I was there. But he and Amy got to talking about the subject of star ratings. The LA Times had just abandoned its long-standing star system, and the chef bemoaned the loss.

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LA Weekly Adds Wine, Food Critics

The journalistic place setting of Jonathan Gold is a big one to fill. So it makes sense that several new hires have been tasked at LA Weekly with taking over the Pulitzer Prize winner’s culinary beat.

Editor-in-chief Sarah Fenske announced today that Amy Scattergood, the editor of Squid Ink, has been promoted to the position of LA Weekly food editor. Under her command will be new three employees, including food blogger Garrett Snyder. Per Fenske:

You may remember Snyder’s byline from that awesomely knowledgeable list of LA’s Best Sushi Places – or his thrilling description of an underground dinner thrown by the Vagrancy Project. Garret graduated from Loyola Marymount University just two years ago, but he’s already one of this city’s best food bloggers, and we’re thrilled to have him on staff.

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Stages of Grief Setting In at LA Weekly Over Jonathan Gold Exit

The reality of Jonathan Gold‘s impeding departure from the LA Weekly is starting to sting the paper’s staff. Especially since the reconstituted Weekly of the past few years has been built largely around food coverage. Squid Ink’s Amy Scattergood is going through her “5 Stages of Grief.” Denial, anger, bargaining, depression and acceptance: they’re all there. And they all seem to involve eating lots of spicy food and sausage.

Meanwhile, Weekly blogger Ali Trachta has taken a more New Orleans dirge-style approach to Gold’s loss–appropriate, given yesterday’s conclusion of the Mardi Gras season. Trachta dug up this hip-hop serenade of Gold and his annual 99 Essential Restaurants list by Conor Knighton.

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Slake Launch Party Draws Ginormous Crowd

Local literary journal Slake celebrated the publication on its second issue with a bash at the Track 16 art gallery in Santa Monica. Well over 700 partygoers showed for the shindig, which included readings by Slake contributors Rachel Resnick, James Greer, John Albert, Amy Scattergood, and FishbowlLA’s own Matthew Fleischer. We were bursting with pride over our little Matty, who drew laughs and hoots from the crowd with his reading of “Mushrooms to Mecca.” An excerpt:

In some countries they call pigeons squab and eat them as a delicacy. In America, we tend to let them feed on our scraps and then get pissed when they shit on our cars — a resource turned into a filthy, disease-ridden nuisance. You can learn a lot about a place by its birds.

And here’s our editor celebrating a reading well read. More pics after the jump.

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LA Times IMAGE Section Debut

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The newest LA Times section, Image, debuted today, and it’s a welcome addition to the other features, once the truly dreadful printing problems are fixed. (The photos in our home-delivery edition weren’t just blurry, they were surreally blurry. We actually thought it was a stylistic choice for about 15 seconds.)

Chloe Sevigny is profiled, and while there’s nothing much new about her clothes-horse qualities, Rose Apodaca makes it interesting. But an Inside the Closet sidebar needs photos of exactly what’s inside–which ankle boots, please.

David Keeps finds a new trend in men’s fashion, and takes a couple of hundred words to describe steampunk. Allegedly this combo of Victorian and hooligan pops up on Deadwood, the cancelled HBO series.

Just in time for summer in Southern California, Amy Scattergood has a how-to piece about that cutting edge trend, knitting. Next fall’s fashions might feature chunky scarves and sweaters, but a beach wear story might have been more helpful–the last line of the story suggests the look might be outdated by the time a knitter finishes a project.

There are a number of other sort of ho-hum pieces, including a really dense story on the science of skin creams that never came out and said which ones are worth the money.

Adam Tschorn, who’s married to fashion critic Booth Moore, wrote some of the liveliest pieces: one on Justin Timberlake’s stylist and a step-by step guide to growing a mustache. Both were fun to read–too bad Moore’s story about fashion gossip was so stale.

Image
is off to a good start. If the Times editors can resist using the same old pool of predictable writers and done-to-death ideas (no stories on couture for kids or little dogs, please), reading about fashion might be as much fun as shopping.