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Posts Tagged ‘Andrew Sullivan’

The Two-Pronged Approach Responsible for The Week’s Record Traffic

StevenKotkoHeadshotThe Web stats are all going in the right direction.

In May, per comScore, theweek.com registered 7.7 million unique visitors across all platforms. The Google Analytics numbers were even higher (ten million uniques). Meanwhile, for the first half of 2014, The Week will be reporting at the end of the month to the Alliance for Audited Media (AAM) its highest-ever circulation total. Those stats will be publicly released August 7.

So how did they do it? “It’s really two-fold,” explains The Week and Mental Floss CEO Steven Kotok (pictured) during a recent phone conversation with FishbowlNY. “We’ve completely remade the content of the site in the last six to nine months, and there were two prongs to that.”

“On the one prong, we just went on a hiring spree and really wanted to hire the best, young opinion writers in the country,” he adds. “People we love to read and also, people with more ability on social media. Most of these people were brought on full-time; a couple have permanent freelance arrangements.”

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Travel Writing

Travel WritingStarting September 23, learn how to turn your travel stories into published essays and articles! Taught by a former Vanity Fair staff writer, James Sturz will teach you how to report, interview, and find sources, discover story ideas and pitch them successfully, and understand what travel editors look for in a story. Register now! 

Morning Media Newsfeed: García Márquez Dead at 87 | Whoopi Gets New Gig | Wallace Re-Signs

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Gabriel García Márquez, Nobel Laureate, Dies at 87 (GalleyCat)
Colombian author Gabriel García Márquez passed away Thursday. He was 87 years old. Time The Nobel Prize-winning author was hospitalized for nine days in late March for an infection in his lungs and urinary tract. He had been recovering in his home in Mexico City since April 8. NYT His death was confirmed by Cristóbal Pera, his former editor at Random House. García Márquez, who received the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1982, wrote fiction rooted in a mythical Latin American landscape of his own creation, but his appeal was universal. His books were translated into dozens of languages. He was among a select roster of canonical writers — Dickens, Tolstoy and Hemingway among them — who were embraced both by critics and a mass audience. The Guardian Journalists gathered outside García Márquez’s house in Mexico City in the hope that one of the family members who was reportedly at his side would emerge. Mexican president Enrique Peña Nieto expressed sadness at the death of “one of the greatest writers of our time,” in the name of Mexico, the novelist’s adopted home. Chilean writer Luis Sepúlveda was quoted by the Mexican newspaper Reforma as saying that he was “the most important writer in Spanish of the 20th century.” WSJ Born in the sleepy town of Aracataca, Colombia, García Márquez was best known for his 1967 masterpiece, One Hundred Years of Solitude. In a career spanning more than 60 years, García Márquez wrote some of the Spanish language’s most revered books, many of which became best sellers in the U.S. They included Autumn of The Patriarch, Chronicle of A Death Foretold, Love in The Time of Cholera and The General in His Labyrinth. García Márquez was also an accomplished journalist, whose lyrical, deeply reported stories first caught the eye of readers in Colombia’s capital, Bogotá, in the early 1950s. He later became renowned not only his profiles of presidents and despots but for the real-life close ties he cultivated with leaders ranging from Fidel Castro to Bill Clinton to François Mitterrand.

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Has Arthur Yorinks Lost His Marbles? Acclaimed Author Launches Short Story Subscription Service

We kid Arthur Yorinks, because the name of his new Web venture is in fact, indeed – Lost Marbles.

LostMarblesLogoNevertheless, there remains at our end a healthy dose of skepticism. It’s one thing to launch a content-subscription portal when your name is Andrew Sullivan. Quite another when it’s Arthur Yorinks. From today’s announcement:

Entirely Web-based and dependent on subscribers, Lost Marbles provides a weekly short story or essay written or curated by Yorinks. There are separate sections for kids and for adults.

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Andrew Sullivan at Six Months: 27,349 Subscribers

We’ve been following Andrew Sullivan and his attempt to run The Dish via subscriber support only, and now that it has been six months since the site launched, he has provided a status update. According to Sullivan, The Dish has 27,349 subscribers and revenue is at $715,000 – not too short of his goal of $900,000 by the end of the year.

Conversion rate for the site is also at 2.5 percent, which is pretty good. However, as Sullivan notes, most of the revenue came within the first few days after The Dish debuted, and things could get hairy if all those people who signed up in the beginning don’t re-up when their year subscription is done.

If you’re one of the many people who hit the metered paywall limit — Sullivan says there are now 28,000 of you — why not subscribe? It’s only $1.99 per month or $19.99 per year. We keep bringing this up because if Sullivan succeeds it’s a positive step for digital journalism, so don’t expect us to stop nagging you anytime soon.

Andrew Sullivan Offers $2 Subscription Deal

Andrew Sullivan is having a tough time keeping his subscription-backed site, The Dish, going. In an effort to spur cheap bastards to pay up, he recently announced he was changing the site’s metered paywall. Now he has taken things a step farther.

Sullivan writes that there is a new $1.99 per month subscription, which will give readers another payment option in addition to the original plan:

Like the $19.99-a-year option, we’re also leaving it up to you if you’d like to pay more – even if that’s only $2 or as much as $5. The point of course is to make this available to as many people at as many price points as you want and need, above a minimum baseline.

Sullivan adds that the site’s gross income is currently at $653,000, not too far from the goal of getting $900,000 by January 1, 2014. However, he explains, “Almost all the likeliest subscribers have joined already. It gets tougher from here on out.”

Most Popular FishbowlNY Stories for the Week

Here’s a look at what FishbowlNY stories made the most buzz this week.

1. Maxim is Up for Sale, March 15

2. Andrew Sullivan Tightens Paywall Because People are Cheap, March 19

3. Judge Grants Rob Morrison Modified Protective Order for Sake of His Son, March 14

4. Hearst Allegedly Cuts Scott Sassa Because He Sexts, March 14

5. Esquire Editor is Cool with Objectifying Women, March 20

 

Keep up-to-date with the latest FishbowlNY news. Click here to sign-up for the FishbowlNY daily newsletter, bringing you our articles each afternoon directly to your inbox.

Andrew Sullivan Tightens Paywall Because People are Cheap

Andrew Sullivan and his experiment in ad-free, completely subscriber based content got off to a great start, but things have since fizzled. In a post, Sullivan wrote that while traffic to The Dish was strong with one million visitors last month, it was time to tighten his metered paywall. From now on, visitors will be allowed only 5 free “read-on” stories (longer features) per 60 days, instead of the previous seven free stories per 30 days.

The two main factors that made Sullivan decrease the free stories was people accessing the site from different platforms and sales that “flat-lined once the meter reset for most people.”

Since Sullivan is diplomatic and happy about all of his readers, we’ll say what he won’t: Pay the man. If you enjoy The Dish, pay for it. It’s only $20 a year. Buy one less Snickers per week or something.

Andrew Sullivan Has Over $500,000 in Pre-Subscriptions

Andrew Sullivans new site — ad free and completely reader-supported — arrives Monday. Since announcing he was setting off on his own earlier this month, Sullivan reports that has already raised over half a million dollars in pre-subscriptions:

The meter and new ad-free site arrives Monday; we migrate (I seriously have no idea what that means) from the Beast over the weekend. But we just passed $500K in pre-subscriptions. Which is to say: holy shit. Seriously: this is still a little hard to absorb. But thank you so much.

Not a bad way to start things off.

GLAAD Announces Media Award Finalists

The finalists for the Gay and Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation (GLAAD) Media Awards have just been announced. The awards are given annually to “recognize and honor media for their fair, accurate and inclusive representations of the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community and the issues that affect their lives.”

While none of our local newspapers were nominated, Frank Bruni of the New York Times is up for Outstanding Newspaper Columnist. Below are the New York based magazine finalists, but congrats to all those who received recognition.

The New York award ceremony will be held March 16, at the Marriott Marquis.

Outstanding Magazine, Overall Coverage:

New York
People
Seventeen
The Advocate/Out
The New Yorker

Outstanding Magazine, Article:

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The Atlantic is Exploring Pay Models

The Atlantic just wrapped up a great year. The magazine was profitable for the third consecutive year, and for the first time, digital ad revenue took up the majority (59 percent) of overall ad revenue. That success has its execs thinking about taking readers back in time.

According to Forbes, The Atlantic will experiment with online pay models this year. Scott Havens, president of The Atlantic, admitted that paid content was going to be “a big area of focus for us,” but then did his best to be as vague as humanly possible by telling Forbes, “It’s not definitely happening, but it’s definitely part of the mix.”

One payment method allegedly being discussed is the trusted metered wall, like the New York Times and Andrew Sullivan are using.

If The Atlantic does launch a pay model it will be a bit of a throwback to the old days. It was only in 2008 that its site became completely free.

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