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Posts Tagged ‘Andy Rosenthal’

Carla Robbins, New York Times Deputy Editorial Page Editor, Steps Down

Politico is reporting that Carla Robbins, who has been with The New York Times since 2006, most recently as deputy editorial page editor, is stepping down.

Robbins is taking book leave, according to a memo Politico obtained from Andy Rosenthal, the Times’ editorial page editor.

“I’m sure you all join me in wishing her success,” wrote Rosenthal.

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Charlie Rose, Star Jones, Joe Kernan and Jack Welch Hold Court

1003_mockup.gifI could just tell the power lunch crowd was (mostly) all business today. The noise level was considerably lower than in past weeks — who needs your neighbor to learn about your next big move before it hits “Page Six”? — and the table hopping was kept to a minimum. It was a tasty mix of moguls (Tom Freston), talking heads (Joe Kernan, Star Jones) and EICs (Amy Astley, Jay Fielden) who kept things interesting.

Speaking of magazines on the move (onward and upward in this case), I was joined today by formidable foodies at the helm of Food Network Magazine, a joint venture of Hearst Magazines and Food Network. Editor Maile Carpenter and publisher/chief revenue officer Vicki Wellington have happened on a recipe for success: Give Food Network fans what they love in print form and — viola! — you’ve got a hit on your hands. Both women were part of the magazine’s launch in 2009 and have seen it rack up a string of accolades, including being named to Adweek’s ‘Hot List’  and Advertising Age’s ‘A List’ last year. “A lot of people told us we were crazy to launch a magazine when we did,” Vicki says of the 2008 prototype, but the numbers silenced the naysayers. The rate base rose from 400,000, to 600,00, to 900,000 in no time and hit 1 million in just four months. The magazine’s ad pages are up 14 percent year to date, and the July-August issue is their biggest ever, with 129 ad pages.

Vicki Wellington, Diane Clehane and Maile Carpenter
Vicki Wellington, Diane Clehane and Maile Carpenter

What’s the secret ingredient? “People watch Food Network 24/7,” Maile told me. “We found that we didn’t have to choose between being accessible and aspirational. The people who love the television shows told us, ‘Be everything!’ and we have. Every month, we have an incredible pool of talent to pull from, and we try to mix it up and give readers a lot of variety.”

Here’s an interesting tidbit lest you think all the pub has to do is call the network’s powers that be to access its squadron of stars: The talent “is not contractually obligated” to appear in the magazine, says Maile. But since its heavy hitters like Guy Fieri (the first Food Network A-lister to see the prototype), Sandra Lee and Alton Brown all love the book, there’s never any shortage of stars to grace its pages. It’s no surprise that recipes (all concocted in the network’s Manhattan kitchens) are a reader favorite. Because there’s such a hunger for them (sorry, that’s my last food pun!), the pub has a new book out, 1000 Easy Recipes: Super Fun Food for Every Day that’s sure to satisfy the busy cook. (There’s 44 different pancake recipes and 100 salads!)

The magazine also gives fans another way to connect with their favorite TV destination with its popular Food Network Lounges where readers meet on-air personalities and sample their cool concoctions in a chic setting. The line was out the door at the last event in Chicago where Anne Burrell met the masses at Jose Garces‘ restaurant. Another Lounge is planned for October in New York to kick off the Food & Wine Festival. And, since food is such a family affair these days, Maile and Vicki have cooked up (okay, last one) a special insert for the September issue, Food Network Kids, as a third cover to be filled with family-friendly recipes and activities for budding foodies to try with mom and dad. Get those cupcake pans ready now!

Here’s the rundown on today’s crowd:

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The New York Times’ ‘Sunday Review’ to Debut June 26th

The wait for the new look “Week in Review” section in the Sunday New York Times is over: It will debut June 26th. And like everyone thought, it’s going to be called “Sunday Review.” According to a memo received by Poynter, select members of the press will be getting a sneak preview of it the Wednesday prior to its launch. Here’s a look at the memo:

We’re holding an informal press breakfast next Thursday, June 23 where we will offer a sneak peak at our newest section, Sunday Review. Sunday Review will offer new features and a new way of presenting our finest analytical and opinion writing; it will debut on Sunday, June 26.

We’ll have a prototype of the section on hand and more information to share. Editorial page editor Andy Rosenthal, op-ed editor Trish Hall, executive editor Bill Keller and columnist Frank Bruni will all be there.

There you have it. We can all relax now and get on with our lives. Okay, we’re lying, FishbowlNY really wants to see what the new section looks like, so this is kind of exciting. What can we say? We’re simple people with simple pleasures.

 

Frank Bruni to be First Gay Op-Ed Columnist in The New York Times’ History

Frank Bruni – a writer for The New York Times since 1995 – has been named an Op-Ed columnist. The move was announced by Andy Rosenthal as part of the much discussed Week in Review section revamp.

According to Rosenthal, Bruni’s column will offer an “opinionated look at a big event of the last week, from a different or unexpected angle, or a small event that was really important but everyone seems to have missed.” Bruni will contribute work for the print section as well as an online column.

Bruni will be the Times’ first openly gay Op-Ed columnist, an honor we’re sure he’s extremely proud of.

Bruni said of joining the Opinion Pages:

I’m excited and really grateful. At The Times and beforehand, I’ve been lucky to be able to write about many different topics, and I’m eager to take on a job that will allow me to range across most or all of them in a reflective, analytical and sometimes — I hope — spirited way.

The New York Times on Why It Still Pays Writers Who Would Write for Free

In light of the current lawsuit by unpaid bloggers against AOL-Huffington Post, HuffPo defenders have made the argument that people knowingly, willingly wrote for the digital news outlet for free, to get broad exposure for their writing, which was worth more than money.

Well, many people would be more than happy to have an op-ed featured in The New York Times even sans payment. We would! But the Times op-ed page pays writers — with some exceptions. “Public figures, politicians and the like, get nothing,” a Times spokeswoman said, as Jeff Bercovici at Forbes reports.

So why does the Times pay, and Huffington Post does not?

It’s a matter of principle, said Andy Rosenthal, the Times’ editorial page editor. “The basic concept is that we think writers should be paid for their work.”

Agreed! But it’s a bit more complicated than that, as the Times only publishes a few op-ed pieces a day. Even if Huffington Post adopted the principle that it’s a good use of money to pay writers, paying every single HuffPo blogger would add up costs for the outlet very quickly. But it’s certainly something to aspire to.

Columnist Bob Herbert Is Leaving The New York Times After Almost 20 Years

After nearly 20 years with the New York Times, columnist Bob Herbert has resigned, editorial page editor Andy Rosenthal announced in a staff memo Friday. His last column will appear in the paper on Saturday.

“He was often called ‘the conscience of The Times,’” Rosenthal wrote. “We will miss him and wish him the best in his new endeavors.”

In a message accompanying the announcement, Herbert explained his decision:

The deadlines and demands were a useful discipline, but for some time now I have grown eager to move beyond the constriction of the column format, with its rigid 800-word limit, in favor of broader and more versatile efforts.

It may be difficult to imagine the Times Op-Ed page without Herbert’s voice, and Rosenthal said it was too soon to know who might replace Herbert, and whether it would be one person or possibly more.

This is only the latest in a series of shakeups at the Times Op-Ed page, including Frank Rich, who left earlier this month for New York magazine, David Shipley, who left for Bloomberg’s new opinion venture, and editor Mark Lotto, who is leaving for GQ.

More Changes at The New York Times Opinion Section

As Frank Rich departs, Joe Nocera arrives. Michael Calderone at The Cutline is reporting that Nocera is moving from the Business section of the New York Times to its Op-Ed pages, beginning April 1st.

Andy Rosenthal said the following in a memo to Times staffers, regarding Nocera’s new digs:

Our readers have come to rely on his sharp insights into the often opaque world of business and finance. We’re certain he will find a new audience on Op-Ed, where we know he will continue to illuminate difficult issues and expose bad behavior by business and government.

Trish Hall Named Op-Ed Editor for New York Times

Trish Hall has just been named the new Op-Ed Editor for the New York Times. Hall most recently worked as Assistant Managing Editor for the paper, where she was responsible for the Dining, Home, Thursday Styles, Travel, Real Estate and Sunday Style sections.

The move will be effective Febuary 7th. Andy Rosenthal had this to say in a memo to staffers:

I can’t think of anyone better suited for a job that has always been hard, requiring a broad range of knowledge and interests, as well as editing, managing and diplomatic skills. It is going to be an even bigger, more fun, and harder job now, as we seek to expand and develop our Opinion report.

Keller: Times Staffers Lax In Ethics Compliance

friedman.pngEver since New York Times columnist Thomas Friedman (left) publicly returned a $75,000 speakers’ fee earlier this month, Los Angeles Times columnist James Rainey has been hounding the NYT about their ethics guidelines pertaining to speaking fees.

In today’s column, Rainey published a memo sent to NYT staffers by executive editor Bill Keller and editorial page editor Andy Rosenthal, which instructed staffers who had earned more than $5,000 last year from speaking engagements to report the earnings to supervisors by June 15.

“We have been reviewing the newspaper’s policy on outside speaking engagements,” the memo said. “We believe that you are all adhering to the spirit of the guidelines, both for speaking on behalf of the Times and to promote books. But we have all become lax in complying with the parts of the ethics guidelines that require annual accounting of income from speaking engagements.”

According to the memo, any fees earned by NYT reporters are supposed to be accounted for by January 31 of the following year. Staffers are also required to ask for special permission if they are offered any one speakers’ fee over $5,000 and, if they are promoting a book, they must get proposed appearances pre-approved. And, as Rainey points out, the paper’s ethical rules also prohibit reporters from accepting fees from any group other than non-profit and educational organizations, which is why Friedman had to return his fee from the Bay Area Air Quality Management District.

These guidelines are imposed in order to make sure reporters and columnists maintain an unbiased perspective. But if that is the case, perhaps the Times should consider revealing what organizations are paying staff to speak.

Why Doesn’t the NYT Have a ‘Serious’ Female Columnist?

s-GAIL-COLLINS-MAUREEN-DOWD-large.jpgYou may have noticed New York Times editor Andy Rosenthal is in the ‘Talk to the Times’ hot seat this week. Romenesko picked up this little gem of a question from Paul Bilsky who asked: “I find it a bit peculiar that the two women columnists, Maureen Dowd and Gail Collins, are satirical and humorous. I adore their writing, and generally think they are spot on, but it is almost like you cannot get a “serious” woman columnist. Do you agree?” Says Rosenthal:

O.K., so I admit. I’m answering this because it’s a slow, hanging ball…I would be the last person alive to suggest that Maureen Dowd and Gail Collins are not serious columnists. They are indeed, very serious.

Slow hanging ball? Our opinion of Modo (questionable) and Gail Collins (unquestionable) is no secret around these parts, but what say you readers, does he have a point?

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