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Posts Tagged ‘Ann Shoket’

Freelancers, Pitch Your Features to Seventeen

seventeenjune12 (1).jpgThough it is a long-standing leader in the teen category, the renowned Seventeen provides fashion, beauty and feature articles that are anything but old-fashioned. And what do its editors most need freelancers for? Surprisingly, it’s not the front of the book.

“I think that freelancers are best to do the big, juicy, heavy-lifting, exciting, extravaganza stories,” said editor-in-chief Ann Shoket.

Although the mag doesn’t use a lot of outside contributors, the mag is open as long as you can nail the Seventeen voice, which Shoket describes as “crazy, insanely fun, delicious, weird, and unique.”

Get email addresses for all editors accepting pitches in How To Pitch: Seventeen. [subscription required]

If an actual job is what you want, watch our 2011 Media Beat interview where Shoket explains what she looks for in new hires after the jump.

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Freelancers, Pitch Your Features to Seventeen

seventeenjune12 (1).jpgThough it is a long-standing leader in the teen category, the renowned Seventeen provides fashion, beauty and feature articles that are anything but old-fashioned. And what do its editors most need freelancers for? Surprisingly, it’s not the front of the book.

“I think that freelancers are best to do the big, juicy, heavy-lifting, exciting, extravaganza stories,” said editor-in-chief Ann Shoket.

Although the mag doesn’t use a lot of outside contributors, the mag is open as long as you can nail the Seventeen voice, which Shoket describes as “crazy, insanely fun, delicious, weird, and unique.”

Get email addresses for all editors accepting pitches in How To Pitch: Seventeen. [subscription required]

If an actual job is what you want, watch our 2011 Media Beat interview where Shoket explains what she looks for in new hires after the jump.

Read more

The A-List Returns! Barbara Walters, Charlie Rose, Barry Diller Hold Court at Michael’s

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As Januarys go, this one has been a bit of a snoozer, but things are finally picking up now that the boldface names have returned to their regular perches at Michael’s. The joint was jumping today as morning talkers (Charlie Rose, Barbara Walters), media moguls (Barry Diller) and fashionistas (Marie Claire‘s Joanna Coles) were all in full power lunch mode. It’s about time!

I was joined today by Seventeen editor-in-chief Ann Shoket and Hearst executive director of public relations Alexandra Carlin. It’s been a while since Seventeen was required reading in my house (I still remember begging my father to drive me to the stationary store,  so I could be the first to get the magazine’s coveted September back to school issue). Back then, I’d devour every oversize page, finding tons of inspiration and validation about surviving the treacherous teenage years in one piece — and in style.

Well, the more things change, the more they stay the same. Ann, who celebrated her fifth anniversary with the magazine last week, says she feels a “huge responsibility” to readers, which means addressing the issues they care most about (a tall order to say the least). Between dealing with ‘sextortion’ (boyfriends threatening to dump girls if they don’t submit sexually) and the barrage of unrealistic images of physical perfection all around them, today’s teenage girls, says Ann, are under “huge pressure” all while dealing with the requisite drama that comes with being a high school girl.  Seventeen‘s mission is to empower teenage girls (the average reader is 16), often by reporting on celebrities who can be a source of inspiration.  For next month’s cover, the magazine scored the first interview with a post-rehab Demi Lovato who opens up about how she battled back from anorexia, bulimia, bipolar disorder and cutting. “Demi was amazing. It’s so refreshing to have a celebrity be honest about their struggles. It’s great for girls to read about someone like that.”

Diane Clehane, Ann Shoket and Alexandra Carlin
Diane Clehane, Ann Shoket and Alexandra Carlin

Seventeen, says Ann, is also a resource for girls about subjects they might want to talk about with their parents, but can’t. Topic A: ‘Digital Drama’ – the magazine’s clever moniker for ‘cyber bullying’ which “sounds so nineties.” Seventeen is so committed to wiping out the epidemic that Ann created the ‘Delete Digital Drama’ campaign for the magazine. “We only had to deal with the mean girl phone calls, but today social media has created so many more outlets for bullying to happen. It’s a serious problem.”

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Seventeen Pushes Luxury Message

Adweek is reporting that the April style guide for Hearst’s Seventeen will feature more high-end products than usual for the magazine. The issue will include items like a pair of $400 Marc Jacob shoes, something that sounds a bit out of reach for most teens.

Ann Shoket, Editor-in-Chief of Seventeen, tells Adweek that the expensive items are merely showing readers options:

We 100 percent do not want to alienate our readers who want to shop at accessible price points. We always want to be at reach for our readers…But there’s something to be said for delicious designer splurges. This style guide was a real reaction to that.

Shoket is right, there’s plenty to be said about delicious designer splurges. FishbowlNY would start with “Maybe Seventeen can leave out the splurges since most of America’s teens aren’t able to afford them, much less their parents, which makes parents’ jobs tougher than it already is because now the shoes the teens can afford are suddenly uncool” and go from there.

Seventeen‘s Ann Shoket on Her Role in the Launch of Mediabistro

Ann Shoket is no stranger to this thing called the Internet. Before becoming editor-in-chief of Seventeen, she published her own e-zine, launched CosmoGirl! online, and suggested to mediabistro.com founder Laurel Touby that she launch a media community web site.

Although she calls her time as an entrepreneur “fun and interesting,” Shoket says the Web actually hasn’t changed much since 1996. “We didn’t make a dime, and we spent an incredible amount of time in all sorts of silly pursuits.”

Uh, yeah. Pretty much sounds like today.

Part 1: Media Beat: Ann Shoket Says ‘The Web is Not Eating Our Lunch’

Part 2: Media Beat: Ann Shoket Says Editors Need to Think Beyond the Page

Media Beat is mediabistro.com’s interview series with the movers and shakers of the media world. View all past episodes at MediaBeat.com.

Seventeen‘s Ann Shoket: Editors Need to Think Beyond the Page

If the thought of working for Seventeen conjures images of attending VIP events for “research,” being able to expense your lipstick addiction, and generally basking in the glow of crazy, insane, delicious, wonderful, fun on a daily basis, you’re right.

Seriously, editor-in-chief Ann Shoket says the biggest thing she looks for in new hires is an “ability to think surround” by considering social media outreach, advertising partners, and possible Web content for all articles. “A magazine story doesn’t resonate if it’s just on the page,” she says.

Part 1: Media Beat: Ann Shoket Says “The Web is Not Eating Our Lunch”

Part 3: Media Beat: Ann Shoket’s Role in the Launch of mediabistro.com

Media Beat is mediabistro.com’s interview series with the movers and shakers of the media world. View all past episodes at MediaBeat.com.

Seventeen‘s Ann Shoket: ‘The Web is Not Eating Our Lunch’

Know of any young people who get their news from the daily paper or monthly magazine? Nah, me neither. So you’d think that, out of all the publications folding left and right, those in the teen category would be suffering more than most.

Not true, says Ann Shoket, editor-in-chief of Seventeen. Not only does she refuse to buy into the print-is-dying belief, she says the 66-year-old publication actually gained readers in the coveted under-21 set during the recession. “The Web is not eating our lunch. We don’t have a readership problem. We are not losing our readership to the Web,” says Shoket. “Girls love the Internet, absolutely, but the Internet brings us readers.”

Watch the first installment of our interview for more details on the “Seventeen everywhere” philosophy and Shoket’s take on the current fashion-magazine-as-reality-show trend.

Part 2: Media Beat: Ann Shoket Says Editors Need to Think Beyond the Page

Part 3: Media Beat: Ann Shoket’s Role in the Launch of mediabistro.com

Media Beat is mediabistro.com’s interview series with the movers and shakers of the media world. View all past episodes at MediaBeat.com.

Seventeen EIC Ann Shoket: Recession Is Chance To Be As “Creative As Possible”

mmm_2-3.gifUp next for “Decision-Maker Week” is Seventeen magazine editor-in-chief Ann Shoket.

We talk to Shoket about how the economy is affecting her publication — and the industry as a whole. But she also has a way to combat the negativity. “Nobody wants to read a magazine that’s a downer,” she says. “Our whole mission is to help girls have fun and celebrate that exuberant, crazy hyper caffeinated fun of being a teenager.”

Shoket says the recession is a time to be creative. “We are working to be as creative as possible to generate interesting fun cool edit programs that our advertisers can get excited about,” she says.

Also discussed: how she stays “deeply in touch” with her inner 16-year-old, the benefit of her America’s Next Top Model appearances and the story of how a coffee between Shoket and Laurel Touby helped launch mediabistro.com.

You can listen to all the past podcasts at BlogTalkRadio.com/mediabistro and call in at 646-929-0321.

MSNBC Pres. Phil Griffin Kicks Off “Decision-Maker Week” on the Menu

mmm_2-3.gifOn the mediabistro.com Morning Media Menu podcast we’ve had anchors and reporters, authors and bloggers. But this week we’re doing something different — talking to some big names in the media world who shape what that world looks like.

We’re kicking off “Decision-Maker Week” with MSNBC President Phil Griffin.

From record ratings to big upcoming programming changes (and questions about a continued shift left), there is no shortage of material to talk about.

“I think cable news is in a good position,” says Griffin. “In the middle of that is really our success. Not only did people think that cable news would lose much of its audience after the election, but they thought MSNBC would. That we had huge growth and it would go away, and in fact, that did not happen.”

Griffin previewed what’s happening on June 29, which includes new daytime shows and the launch of an HD channel. “I want personalities vested in the programming,” he says. “That’s what works in prime, that’s what works in the morning. And that’s what’s going to work during the day.” (As for other changes, Griffin says “stay tuned.”)

Also discussed: the genesis of “The Place For Politics” (it involved Tim Russert), his take on Fox News’ recent ratings success and his cautious support of Twitter.

You can listen to all the past podcasts at BlogTalkRadio.com/mediabistro and call in at 646-929-0321. Tomorrow on the Menu: Seventeen Magazine EIC Ann Shoket.

Video: Exclusive Interviews Live at the Matrix Awards

touby_4-28.jpgDanyLevyVideo.jpg mediabistro.com was on the scene at Monday’s 39th annual Matrix Awards honoring women’s achievements in the communications industry. Today co-anchor Meredith Vieira, a past winner and this year’s emcee, told TVNewser before the ceremony began, “This is a room full of such accomplished women, it’s a little mind-boggling.”

mediabistro.com founder and senior vice president Laurel Touby caught up with Daily Candy founder and editorial director Dany Levy (who sold her company for $125 million in August 2008), ProPublica editor-in-chief Paul Steiger, Seventeen editor-in-chief Ann Shoket, and Studio 360 anchor Kurt Andersen to discuss the future of the media industry, with the news of Portfolio‘s closure as a catalyst for conversation.

Watch the videos to find out what they had to say about Portfolio‘s demise and more, after the jump…

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