TVNewser FishbowlDC AgencySpy TVSpy LostRemote PRNewser SocialTimes AllFacebook 10,000 Words GalleyCat UnBeige MediaJobsDaily

Posts Tagged ‘AOL’

Hello! And Welcome to the End of Moviefone!

Although Moviefone was launched in 1989, it wasn’t until Thanksgiving 1995 that the service was officially embedded to the pop culture lexicon. On November 19 of that year, a subplot of Seinfeld episode “Pool Guy” had Kramer forced to take over 777-FILM auto-attendant duties.

And now, as noted by New York Times reporter Brooks Barnes, the service is about to be wholly transitioned from voice to Web:

Over the weekend, callers were told that the automated service would soon go silent, overtaken by new technology and shifting consumer habits.

“The 777-FILM numbers will no longer be in service in the near future,” intones a man with a voice decidedly scrawnier in timbre than Mr. Moviefone’s. “To buy tickets and for all of your showtime information please download the free Moviefone app on your smartphone or iPad.”

Read more

Morning Media Newsfeed: Keller Departs NYT | Armstrong Apologizes | Intercept Launched

Click here to receive Mediabistro’s Morning Media Newsfeed via email.

Bill Keller, Former Editor of The New York Times, Is Leaving for News Nonprofit (NYT)
Bill Keller, a columnist at The New York Times and its former executive editor, will leave the paper to become editor in chief of The Marshall Project, a nonprofit journalism start-up focused on the American criminal justice system. “It’s a chance to build something from scratch, which I’ve never done before,” Keller said, “and to use all the tools that digital technology offers journalists in terms of ways to investigate and to present on a subject that really matters personally.” NBCNews.com He is slated to begin his leadership position at The Marshall Project on March 1. The nonprofit venture was formed late last year by Neil Barsky, a journalist turned Wall Street hedge fund manager, who will serve as publisher. The Washington Post / Style Keller began his tenure by overseeing coverage of the lead-up to, and aftermath of, the U.S. military invasion of Iraq in 2003. The Times later acknowledged that its reporting on this period — particularly on the existence of weapons of mass destruction in Iraq — was flawed. Under Keller’s editorship, the Times published excerpts of sensitive U.S. military and diplomatic files obtained by WikiLeaks, the anti-secrecy organization that had received them from then-Army Pvt. Bradley Manning. The paper also published stories disclosing the George W. Bush administration’s practice of “warrantless wiretapping” of suspected terrorists in 2005. Politico / Dylan Byers on Media “Bill has made so many contributions to the Times over his 30 years here, it’s difficult to quantify them,” Arthur Sulzberger Jr., the Times‘ publisher said in a statement. Politico / Dylan Byers on Media For all his feats, including leading the paper out of one of the most tumultuous periods in its history, Keller had a vexed relationship with members of the Times leadership: its publisher, Arthur Sulzberger, Jr., and its editorial page editor, Andrew Rosenthal, who Keller has reported to since 2011.

Read more

Morning Media Newsfeed: Leno Signs Off | Carville Joins Fox | AOL CEO Under Fire

Click here to receive Mediabistro’s Morning Media Newsfeed via email.

Emotional Jay Leno Bids Star-Studded Farewell to Tonight Show (Reuters)
Comedian Jay Leno said an emotional goodbye to The Tonight Show on Thursday with a star-studded farewell led by actor Billy Crystal, after hosting the NBC late-night program for more than 20 years and handing the reins over to Jimmy Fallon. Leno, 63, who took over one of U.S. broadcast television’s marquee programs in 1992 from Johnny Carson, came out to a standing ovation from the audience of friends and family, shaking hands with many as he did in each show. Variety Characteristically, Leno wasn’t particularly maudlin or sentimental at first, at least compared to Carson’s “very heartfelt goodnight” that preceded Leno’s briefly interrupted stint as Carson’s successor. THR / The Live Feed Celebrity friends — or, in some cases, just celebrities — that appeared onstage included Jack Black, Kim Kardashian, Chris Paul, Sheryl Crow, Jim Parsons, Carol Burnett and Oprah Winfrey. The seven joined Billy Crystal in a snarky musical salute to Leno, and Winfrey got one of the night’s biggest laughs by singing a line of Crystal’s slightly tweaked “So Long, Farewell” from The Sound of Music. TheWrap The episode felt like an affectionate roast. Leno, once accused of jealously refusing to yield the show, was plenty generous with airtime. He left it to others to get most of the laughs, though he got plenty of his own too: At one point he said the real shame was that in all his time on the show, O.J. Simpson never found the real killers. The Washington Post / Television It wasn’t until Leno’s tearful speech at the end that this final show felt worthy of shelf space in television’s historical vault. “Boy this is the hard part,” Leno said, quickly verklempt. He thanked his audience and talked about how lucky he felt to have interviewed “presidents, astronauts, movie stars…” But he was most appreciative of his hard-working, union-labor staff: “The first year of this show I lost my mom; the second year I lost my dad. Then my brother died and after that I was pretty much out of family. The folks here became my family,” Leno said. “When people say to me, ‘Hey, why don’t you go to ABC, why don’t you go to Fox?’ — [but] I didn’t know anybody over there. These are the only people I know.”

Read more

AOL Revenue up 13 Percent Behind Strong Ad Sales

AOL’s fourth quarter was a strong one. In fact, Tim Armstrong, AOL’s CEO, boldly proclaimed that it was AOL’s “most successful year in the last decade.” The company reported that revenue was up 13 percent compared to Q4 2012, backed by a 23 percent jump in ad sales.

The big winner for AOL was its Third Party Network, which saw sales increase by a whopping 63 percent during the fourth quarter. Included in the Third Party Network is Adap.tv, a platform which helps companies advertise on websites. AOL purchased Adap.tv in August of last year, a move that now seems extremely smart.

AOL’s total revenue rose six percent compared to 2012.

New Patch Owner Cuts Hundreds of Staffers

PatchLogoHale Global, the company that bought Patch from AOL in January, is slimming down operations. Jim Romenesko reports that the company has fired “hundreds” (about two thirds of staffers) from Patch. And the way they did it wasn’t exactly pretty.

In a conference call from Leigh Zarelli Lewis, Patch’s COO, the news was laid out in blunt terms. Here’s how it went, according to a transcript:

Hale Global has decided which Patch employees will receive an offer of employment to move forward in accordance with their vision for Patch and which will not. Unfortunately, your role has been eliminated and you will no longer have a role at Patch and today will be your last day of employment with the company. …Thank you again and best of luck.

We like how she added “best of luck.”

F*ck off everyone who got paid little for lots of work! But uh, best of luck too.

AOL Sells Winamp and Shoutcast

aol-logo-9AOL has sold Winamp and Shoutcast, two music sites that are on their last legs, for between $5 and $10 million. Consider that one reason why we’re not executives. We’d never imagine that someone would be willing to pay that much for dead in the water sites.

Radionomy, a digital music company, has purchased both sites. As part of the deal, AOL is taking a 12 percent stake in Radionomy. Techcrunch reports that the buy is about expanding Radionomy’s reach:

In both cases, this will be a volume play for Radionomy. Among its other assets is the TargetSpot audio ad network, and the plan will be to use both Shoutcast and Winamp to increase TargetSpot’s inventory, and as everyone knows advertising is a game of scale.

Morning Media Newsfeed: Sanfuentes Out at NBC | Dorsey to Disney Board | AOL’s HuffPost Hopes

Click here to receive Mediabistro’s Morning Media Newsfeed via email.

Former D.C. Bureau Chief Leaves NBC News (NY Post)
Antoine Sanfuentes, the former Washington bureau chief for NBC News, is exiting the network. The news was confirmed in a farewell note emailed to staff by Sanfuentes Monday morning. The journalist had been with the Peacock network for 24 years. His last day is Jan. 20, he said in the email, a copy of which was reviewed by The New York Post. HuffPost His exit is the latest shakeup during what has already been a bumpy year for NBC News. Turness took over as president this past summer, and Today and Meet The Press have both struggled in the ratings. NY Post Turness is turning her attention to her troubled Sunday talk show, Meet The Press — asking staff to write a mission statement and explain what works and what doesn’t, the Post has learned. Turness has been reviewing individual shows one by one with the aim of having staff focus more clearly on winning the ratings wars, sources said. FishbowlDC But while Meet The Press has slipped in recent months from a strong first place in the ratings to third, NBC sources close to the matter tell FishbowlDC that scrapping the show — one of NBC’s marquee brands — is not on the table.

Read more

Morning Media Newsfeed: Patch Shutting Down? | Megyn Kelly on Santa | NYT Making Changes

Click here to receive Mediabistro’s Morning Media Newsfeed via email.

AOL Chief’s White Whale Finally Slips His Grasp (NYT)
Tim Armstrong, the chief executive of AOL, is finally winding down Patch, a network of local news sites that he helped invent and that AOL bought after he took over. At a conference in Manhattan last week, Armstrong suggested that Patch’s future could include forming partnerships with other companies, an acknowledgment that AOL could not continue to go it alone in what has been a futile attempt to guide Patch to profitability. He called it, somewhat hilariously, “an asset with optionality.” There may be a few options for Patch, but none come close to the original vision for the site. The hunt to own the lucrative local advertising market, Armstrong’s white whale, is over. TechCrunch If Patch is shuttered for good, that represents a significant blow for Armstrong, who has nurtured the site as a pet project since launching it in 2007 while he was still at Google. AOL bought Patch in 2009 after Armstrong became its CEO. AOL says the report that Patch is winding down is “factually inaccurate.”

Read more

New Catchphrase? Tim Armstrong Deems Patch an ‘Asset with Optionality’

ShutterstockTimArmstrongFor Patch local editors grappling with shopping mall Santa features and overseeing in some cases a great many additional hubs, these words likely rang hollow. But to FishbowlNY’s ears, a portion of Tim Armstrong‘s remarks at this week’s UBS conference were Office Space-worthy.

Per a report by Ad Age‘s Alex Kantrowitz, Armstrong suggested that the possibility of a major impending partnership for Patch is one big reason AOL shareholders should view the hyper-local network as an “asset with optionality.” Rather than, say, an “option with assanality” or a “gigantic tactical embarrassment.”

We’re going to suggest right here and now: Any NYC media denizen who manages to seamlessly make use of this terminology at an upcoming holiday celebration will forever earn our admiration. That bowl of spiked punch? That empty conference room? That fully loaded copier? These are all, theoretically, “assets with optionality.”

Read more

Morning Media Newsfeed: NYT‘s Embargo Fiasco | AOL EIC Out | SpaghettiOs’ Tweet

Click here to receive Mediabistro’s Morning Media Newsfeed via email.

NYT Scoops Itself (Politico / Dylan Byers on Media)
The New York Times had a “groundbreaking” story, and the Las Vegas Sun published it first. Just before 8 p.m. on Sunday, New York Times political editor (and soon-to-be Washington bureau chief) Carolyn Ryan announced via Twitter that her paper had “a very unusual, groundbreaking” story due for publication later that evening. “I can’t say too much but it’ll make u rethink- well, I should stop. Stay tuned,” she wrote. Ryan’s tease gave way to a torrent of inquiries and speculation from fellow journalists — the hashtag #nytguesses became a popular meme. Gawker As time paused for Ryan, the Las Vegas Sun, a subscriber to the New York Times wire, found the story slug and eventually published the full piece on the Sun website around 8 p.m. NY Mag / Daily Intelligencer BuzzFeed’s Andrew Kaczynski noticed that the Times News Service’s raw budget appeared on the website of the Las Vegas Sun, and that one story sure seemed to fit the bill, as described by Ryan. The Sun appears to have violated its contract with Times News Service. Toward the bottom of the budget, a paragraph stipulates that sharing the document constitutes a violation of the contract terms. Just after midnight the Sun pulled the story and apologized, appropriately, via Twitter. Facebook / Las Vegas Sun “Due to a technical problem, the Las Vegas Sun prematurely published a New York Times News Service story Sunday on the Sun’s website. The problem occurred when a new wire feed that the Sun implemented last week failed to recognize that the story was embargoed for publication at a later time. The Sun has pulled the story from its site and apologizes for this inadvertent error.”

Read more

<< PREVIOUS PAGENEXT PAGE >>