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Posts Tagged ‘Aron Pilhofer’

Morning Media Newsfeed: YouTube to Acquire Twitch | Abramson Speaks | Pilhofer to Guardian

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YouTube to Acquire Videogame-Streaming Service Twitch for $1 Billion (Variety)
Google’s YouTube has reached a deal to buy Twitch, a popular videogame-streaming company, for more than $1 billion, according to sources familiar with the pact. If completed the acquisition would be the most significant in the history of YouTube, which Google acquired in 2006 for $1.65 billion. The impending acquisition comes after longtime Google ad exec Susan Wojcicki was named CEO of YouTube earlier this year. SocialTimes As more consumers cut the cord in search of alternative forms of entertainment, Twitch has experienced impressive growth. In 2013, the service had more unique monthly users than Netflix and Hulu, and it jumped into the top 15 online services recently, passing HBO Go in terms of bandwidth. Mashable More than 1 million gamers broadcast on Twitch each month through Xbox One, PlayStation 4 and their computers; more than 45 million people log on to watch each month. Since its founding in 2011, Twitch has raised more than $35 million in funding. And let’s not forget Twitch Plays Pokémon earlier this year, which was possibly one of the most popular open source gaming experiences ever. GigaOM The Twitch acquisition could help YouTube finally get a foothold in the live video space. Live video has been a complicated subject for YouTube. The video service started to dabble with live streaming all the way back in 2010. In reality, live still doesn’t get big enough audiences to warrant high ad prices, and the fragmented nature of live streaming on YouTube hasn’t made it easier to win over big brands. Twitch has been the one notable exception to this move away from ad-supported live streaming.

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Aron Pilhofer Joins The Guardian; Elle and Mashable Add Editors

A few more moves today, involving The Guardian, Elle and Mashable. Details are below.

  • Aron Pilhofer is leaving The New York Times for The Guardian. Pilhofer had been with the Times since 2005, most recently serving as associate managing editor for digital strategy. At The Guardian, Pilhofer will serve as executive editor of digital, a new role at the company.
  • Elle has added Rebecca Traister and Amanda Fortini as contributing editors. Traister will continue as a senior editor at The New Republic. Fortini’s work has appeared in The New Yorker, The New York Times, The New York Times Magazine, Rolling Stone, New York and more.
  • Louise Roug has been named Mashable’s first global news editor. Roug was formerly the foreign editor for Newsweek and The Daily Beast, from 2010 to 2013.

The New York Times Shortens Reader Comments to 2,000 Characters

For The New York Times, it appears less is more. At least when it comes to reader comments on the website. Today the paper announced that it will now limit comments on article to 2,000 charahcters, down from its usual limit of 5,000. The Wrap investigated this new policy, and this is what Aron Pilhofer, Editor of Interactive News, had to say:

We’ve had one of the highest character limits known to humanity for a long time. We’ve gotten feedback from readers and frequent commenters, as well as internally, that our character limit is too high, that maybe we should force people to be a little more succinct. 5,000 is a lot. That’s not a comment, that’s an article.

He’s right. As you’ve no doubt seen, a lot of the people who leave comments on websites (not FishbowlNY readers, of course) do so with nothing positive to add. The Times is making a smart move by limiting the length of those comments. Now instead of writing a novel about how wrong a writer is, readers will have to write an essay.

Knight Foundation Awards $5.1 Million To News Challenge Winners

documentcloud.pngYesterday, the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation announced the winners of its 2009 Knight News Challenge, which provides funding to innovative digital news projects submitted to the foundation.

This year, the Knight Foundation awarded a total of $5.1 million in grants to nine new projects and 17 winners from the two previous years. The largest amount of funding — $719,500 — went to a project called DocumentCloud, a joint venture between The New York Times and ProPublica. Talking Points Memo is also joining in the collaboration, the company said yesterday.

According to the Knight Foundation, DocumentCloud will be “a Web site that will enhance investigative reporting by making source documents easy to find, share and read” by providing “an online database of documents contributed by a consortium of news organizations, watchdog groups and bloggers, and shared with the public at large.”

The project is led by Ben Koski and Aron Pilhofer of the Times and ProPublica’s Scott Klein and Eric Umansky (in the picture above). Today, Eric, Aron and Scott joined in an interactive chat on Poynter.org, explaining what DocumentCloud will be.

“Too many documents today still end up on the digital equivalent of the cutting room floor,” they said. “What documents journalists do post — and of course they increasingly do — they’re PDFs, a not particularly user-friendly format. DocumentCloud is meant to make each step along the way much easier, and moreover will make the documents more journalistically valuable by showing information about them and the relations between them.”

A full list of the winners and a description of their projects can be found here.

This is the third year that the Knight Foundation has held its News Challenge, and it has pledged to donate $25 million over 5 years.