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Posts Tagged ‘Arthur Sulzberger’

Arthur Sulzberger Made $6.9 Million Last Year

Arthur Sulzberger, chairman of The New York Times Company, is doing quite well. Not that you asked, but just in case you were wondering, things couldn’t be better.

According to The Wall Street Journal, in a Securities and Exchange Commission filing, the Times reported that Sulzberger earned a whopping $6.9 million in 2012. That’s up from $5.9 million in 2011.

Not bad, right? Sure, it’s not Michael Bloomberg money, but hey, you have to start somewhere.

New York Times’ Scott Heekin-Canedy to Retire, Role Will Be Eliminated

Scott Heekin-Canedy is retiring from The New York Times Company, effective December 30. Heekin-Canedy has been with the Times since 1992; serving as president and general manager since 2004.

Heekin-Canedy was one of the forces behind the Times implementing its paywall, which has been a success. In a note to staff, Arthur Sulzberger said losing Heekin-Canedy meant that “we are losing a great talent who has seen us through a very difficult economic period.”

According to the Times, Heekin-Canedy’s position will be eliminated when he steps aside.

New York Times Gains Digital Subscribers, But Revenue Drops

The New York Times Company reported its third quarter earnings today. Let’s go with the good news first. Circulation revenue at the company rose by seven percent during the last quarter, thanks in large part to the success of digital subscriptions. The number of digital subscribers to The New York Times and The International Herald Tribune rose to 566,000, an 11 percent increase since 2Q.

Now for the bad news. The company saw overall revenue drop by 0.6 percent, to $449 million. Revenue fell because ad earnings crashed by almost nine percent.

Arthur Sulzberger, of course, tried to stick to the positive news from the report. “While our results for the third quarter reflect continued pressure on advertising revenues, total circulation revenues rose, led by the ongoing expansion of our digital subscription base,” said Sulzberger, in a statement.

Newspaper Guild Sends Another Letter to Arthur Sulzberger

The latest move by the Newspaper Guild of New York to get the New York Times to budge on a new contract involved a new letter to Arthur Sulzberger. Signed by 248 Times staffers, the note urges him to meet the union’s demands, because the alternative is something neither side wants:

As it became clear that not even mediation was moving the company to realistic terms on compensation, we have taken the temperature of the newsroom. Some of our colleagues have moved beyond their bewilderment, past a sense of betrayal, to openly discussing the prospect of having to seek other work, perhaps even new careers. After building the world’s finest newsroom with people who would literally go to war for The Times, you cannot possibly regard these outcomes as desirable. We don’t.

The letter was delivered to Sulzberger only hours after Times union members handed out informational flyers in front of the Times building.

The entire letter to Sulzberger can be read here.

New York Times Names Mark Thompson CEO

Mark Thompson has been named the new president and CEO of The New York Times Company. Thompson is the outgoing director general of the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC), a position he has held since 2004. Aside from a two year stint as CEO of Britain’s Channel 4, Thompson has been with the BBC since he came aboard as a production trainee in 1979.

In a statement, Arthur Sulzberger, chairman of the Times Company, said Thompson is “a gifted and experienced executive with strong credentials whose leadership at the BBC helped it to extend its trusted brand identity into new digital products and services.”

So ends the search for someone to replace Janet Robinson, who departed the Times in December of last year. Now comes the hard part for Thompson and the Times: Dealing with declining ad dollars in a world that continues to shift toward digital media.

From FishbowlNY to Thompson — good luck. You’re probably going to need some.

Most Popular FishbowlNY Stories for the Week

Here’s a look at what FishbowlNY stories made the most buzz this week.

  1. Gawker’s Fox News Mole Reveals … Nothing [Update], April 11
  2. Brian Stelter is New York Media’s Best Boyfriend, April 6
  3. Patch Editor Resigns Brian Farnham, April 11
  4. Hot 97′s Summer Jam 2012 Set for June 3, April 9
  5. New York Times Reporter’s Email Attacking Arthur Sulzberger Leaked, April 10

Keep up-to-date with the latest FishbowlNY news. Click here to sign-up for the FishbowlNY daily newsletter, bringing you our articles each afternoon directly to your inbox.

Arthur Sulzberger’s Son Joins New York Times Metro Desk

A.G. Sulzberger, son of Arthur Sulzberger, has a new home at the Metro section of the paper. According to a memo obtained by Gawker, Sulzberger will join the desk early next month.

Sam Sifton naturally had nothing but good things to say about  Sulzberger’s time at the National desk:

Arthur proved that opening a news bureau in Kansas City, Missouri, was not merely a good idea but a great one. He reveled in quirky, revealing stories (like an accounting of the last shop to process Kodachrome, or a profile of a man who, at 103, was the oldest still-serving federal judge in the country). But when big news came along, again and again he showed that there was no steadier hand on the desk.

Gay Talese: ‘Nobody tells the truth as much as the Times tries to tell the truth.’

If Gay Talese knows one thing, it’s The New York Times. However, when we read that he told Vanity Fair “I think the Times is now better than ever,” it was pretty surprising. After all, the paper is a lot different now. Hell, everything is a lot different than when Talese wrote about the paper back in 1969. But he said he liked it, so there you have it.

Here’s a few more gems from Talese:

On Arthur Sulzberger, Jr.:

I think the Times is now better than ever. Better than when I worked for it. And Sulzberger the publisher has to take credit for it. And I think that the reporters we celebrate tonight are the quintessential journalists of my lifetime, and the editors too: The Jill Abramsons, the Bill Kellers, and the publisher Sulzberger. Here I am sort of making a belated celebration of and tossing of the hat to and making my genuflection to people I criticized four or five years ago.

Read more

Arthur Sulzberger Talks New York Times Paywall

Last night Arthur Sulzberger, Publisher of The New York Times, spoke at a Columbia University journalism event, and most of his time was spent answering questions about his paper’s new paywall.

As the questions kept piling on, Sulzberger grew more agitated, reports The Daily Beast. When people said the paywall system was too complex, he reiterated the subscription offers, then sarcastically added, “So you have three different print plans that you can choose from. And sometimes, on top of that, you can even go outside and buy it.” A perfect answer, if you ask us.

He also denied the rumor that the paywall cost $40 million to produce, compared trying to work around the paywall to stealing a copy of the paper from a newsstand, and to top it all off, said this fake quote – attributed to him – from The Onion was perfect:

If this fails, I’d honestly rather The New York Times not exist in a world where people are unwilling to pay the price of a fucking movie ticket for a monthly online subscription.

FishbowlNY couldn’t agree more.

NYT Execs: Don’t Call It A Pay Wall

PRNewser‘s Joe Ciarallo attended the PaidContent 2010 conference today in New York. At the conference, the top three executives at The New York Times Company addressed perhaps one of the biggest stories in journalism in recent months: the company’s decision to move to a “metered system” over the next year from what is now a completely open and free website.

Arthur Sulzberger, Jr., the company’s chairman & publisher, insisted that the Times is not worried that a pay meter will cause the newspaper to lose relevance. “We are not trying to eliminate ourselves from the digital eco-system,” he said. “We’ll only lose relevance if we lose our brand promise, and our brand promise is having the best journalism you can find.”

“What people misunderstand about the business model issue is it’s not just to figure out a pricing and metered based model, but it’s about how to figure out how to grow your advertising business,” said Martin Neisenholtz, SVP of digital operations. “We intend fully to grow that ad business for as long as we need to, and that is the challenge.”

When asked if the company’s blogs will be a part of the metered system, Neisenholtz said, “Our intention is that blogs would be behind the wall.”

President & CEO Janet Robinson reinforced the stance that the metered system will help the Times grow its ad revenue and audience. “The metered solution is an elegant solution providing both free and paid content. This is a way for us to continue to have a robust ad base but also have a large audience as well,” she said.

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