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Posts Tagged ‘ASME’

ASME Changes Magazine Awards

The changes that ASME President (and People Managing Editor) Larry Hackett promised us back in June have officially set in. According to Adweek, Special Interest Magazines is now called Active and Special Interest, and the General Excellence categories have been revamped as well.

Last year there were six GE categories, now there are only five. They’ve been renamed to show how people look at those titles, too. Fashion, Service and Lifestyle Magazine category is now Women’s Magazines, and Literary Journal and Opinion is now Thought-Leader.

The Ellies have some changes as well. Tablet and mobile specific content is now eligible in a majority of categories, and there are new awards for websites.

The ASME is trying to satisfy people with these alterations, but it shouldn’t expect much reaction. As everyone knows, there’s always something to complain about, you just have to find it.

New ASME President Promises Changes

Larry Hackett, the Managing Editor of People, is also the new President of The American Society of Magazine Editors (ASME). After he was elected Hackett told the other ASME members – who were at Remi for their annual meeting – that changes needed to be made to ASME’s award categories and to the Ellie award ceremony. Adweek reports:

‘I think in some of the categories there could be a sense of, Which of these are not like the others?’ he [Hackett] said. ‘We want to take a look and see if we might sharpen it a bit.’ As for the timing of the event itself, he was more definitive: ‘That just can’t happen again.’

That’s bound to be music to the ears of everyone in the industry. The Ellie categories put magazines that didn’t belong together in the same bunch (People was paired with Fast Company) and the ceremony lasted until almost midnight. Now, if Hackett can just do something about that halibut.

The Controversy over Harper’s Win for Best Reporting at the Ellie

On of the major upsets at the National Magazine Awards this week was the “Reporting” award, which went to Harper’s for Scott Horton‘s “The Guantanamo ‘Suicides’.” The piece had a mixed reception when it was published; moreover, it was up against two standout articles — not just of this year but of any year — the Rolling Stone article “The Runaway General” by Michael Hastings (that led to the resignation of Gen. Stanley McChrystal), and The New Yorker exposé of the Koch brothers by Jane Mayer.

Horton’s piece begins with the premise that not only has President Obama failed to close Guantanamo, he may be more implicated in horrors that have occurred there than has previously come to light. It begins:

[N]ew evidence…suggests the current administration failed to investigate seriously—and may even have continued—a cover-up of the possible homicides of three prisoners at Guantánamo in 2006.

Joe Pompeo at The Cutline gathered up some of the reactions around the media. Slate’s media critic, Jack Shafer, had the most biting criticism over the win:

I am dumbfounded. The Harper’s piece is a souffle of conjecture. Did the judges actually read it? Do they really think the Obama administration is covering up murders committed during the Bush administration?

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National Magazine Awards Roundup: New York, National Geographic Among the Big Winners

Last night’s ASME National Magazine Awards had more than a few surprises. The evening began with a cocktail hour for a change, where FishbowlNY had drinks with Graydon Carter, Bethenny Frankel, David Copperfield, and other media celebrities milling around the red carpet. We caught up with a few nominees, such as the editor of Audobon magazine: “We’ve been nominated for 5 years,” he told us, “and we haven’t won once. I wasn’t going to attend, but then I thought, what if we win this year?”

They didn’t. Oh, well! Some other choice quotes: we heard from Bethenny Frankel that she always reads her magazine coverage in nail salons, because she is medicated on planes.

The evening began on a somber note, with Graydon Carter acknowledging the many journalists who had died or been detained while reporting in war areas, and presenting a slideshow of the work of Vanity Fair contributor Tim Hetherington, who died in Misrata, Libya.

But the mood lightened as the awards were announced. Some of the big winners of the night were New York Times Magazine, New York, and National Geographic, each taking home a couple of awards, with National Geographic jubilantly winning “Magazine of the Year.”

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“Magazine of the Year” Finalists Announced for the 2011 National Magazine Awards

The American Society of Magazine Editors (ASME) announced today the 2011 Magazine of the Year finalists. The five finalists are The Atlantic, Backpacker, Foreign Policy, National Geographic, and Wired.

“The National Magazine Awards introduced the Magazine of the Year category just last year to honor magazines that have achieved distinction in print, online and on tablets and smartphones,” said Sid Holt, Chief Executive of ASME.

Last week ASME announced the finalists for the other awards categories, with The New Yorker leading the pack with nine nominations, followed by New York magazine, The New York Times Magazine, and Virginia Quarterly Review, each with six nominations.

Katie Couric will be hosting the awards gala, which will take place on May 9 in New York City. At least we know one thing she will be doing for sure in the future.

The New Yorker Leads in 2011 National Magazine Awards Nominations

Sid Holt, Chief Executive of the American Society of Magazine Editors (ASME), announced the finalists for the 2011 National Magazine Awards this morning.

Some highlights:

  • The New Yorker leads with nine total nominations. Here are the other magazines receiving multiple nominations:

The Atlantic (4 nominations), Esquire (3), GQ (5), Harper’s Magazine (2), Los Angeles (3), Martha Stewart Living (2), Men’s Journal (2), National Geographic (4), New York (6), The New York Times Magazine (6), The Paris Review (2), Real Simple (3), Scientific American (2), Texas Monthly (2), TIME (2), Vanity Fair (2), Virginia Quarterly Review (6), W (3) and Wired (3). The six never-before-nominated titles are Cooking Light, House Beautiful, Lapham’s Quarterly, OnEarth, The Sun and Women’s Health.

  • The 2011 finalists include Michael Hastings’ ‘The Runaway General,’ which led to the resignation of Stanley McChrystal, and Jane Mayer’s ‘Covert Operations,’ on the billionaire brothers Charles and David Koch.
  • The Awards will include the presentation of the Creative Excellence Award to Tom Wolfe.
  • Bonus: intriguingly, ASME puts women’s magazines (e.g., Women’s Health, Essence) in the “Fashion, Service and Lifestyle Magazines” category, but puts men’s magazines (e.g., GQ) in the “Finance, Technology and Lifestyle Magazines” category.

Reader’s Digest Moves To NYC As Part of Restructuring Plan

rdjjjjj.jpgAfter filing for Chapter 11 this August, Reader’s Digest Association has been working on a restructuring plan to get itself out of debt. Some of this has been the unfortunate (but par for course) shuttering of titles, like Rick Warren‘s ill-fated The Purpose Driven Connection magazine.

Yesterday, editor-in-chief Peggy Northrop mentioned at the ASME luncheon that the Reader’s Digest brand would never again launch a magazine that wasn’t able to perform across different media platforms. And today, RDA continues its attempts to get back in the black, and no it doesn’t involve firing staffers. It looks like the company will be moving its staffers from its offices in Pleasantville, N.Y.

As Keith Kelly reported this morning:

“Some of the 600 employees based in [Pleasantville] will be relocated to White Plains, N.Y. But executive offices and Reader’s Digest magazine’s editorial will move to space at 750 Third Avenue that was recently vacated by S.I. Newhouse’s Condé Nast Publications.

So some editorial staffers will be going to White Plains while the corporate headquarters and other editorial staffers move to NYC to share in the same building as Condé Nast. (FishbowlNY previously reported that The Economist is also moving into that building in the second quarter of next year.) While it’s always terrible to have to pick up your life and move elsewhere for a job, relocating to New York isn’t the worst thing to happen to a magazine staff in the last, oh say, 24 hours. In terms of restructuring, this is one of the more positive moves we’ve seen in awhile, which it should be obvious by the very un-restructuring phrase in CEO Mary Berner‘s letter to the staffers, “Some of you will be excited by this change…”

Berner’s full memo to RDA staffers after the jump.

Previously: Reader’s Digest Files For Ch. 11

Read More: Reader’s Digest moving to NYCNew York Post

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ASME Luncheon: “35 Ways To Win A National Magazine Award”

ellies.jpgThe American Society of Magazine Editors is gearing up for submissions to its 2010 National Magazine Awards. For the first time ever, the awards will include a separate ceremony for digital media, which last year included four categories. This year, they have been expanded into 12 different awards, including blogging and podcasting.

This afternoon at The Princeton Club, members of ASME gathered to hear Will Dana of Rolling Stone, Peggy Northrop of Reader’s Digest, and John Rasmus of <a href="http://www.mediabistro.com/National-Geographic-Adventure-profile.html"National Geographic Adventure give their opinions to moderator Cindi Leive of Glamour on what it takes to win both the digital and traditional awards, arguably the most prestigious in the industry. All three of the panelists have both judged and won previous magazine awards.

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Recession Puts Media Conferences On Hold

NMA-2009-Lg.gifTraditionally, media types like to party amongst themselves, dress up in tuxedos and eat chocolate fondue and call it an industry confab. But times are tough. As the print media shrinks, so too do the glitzy, pricey conferences.

Both the American Society of Newspaper Editors and the Magazine Publishers of America have canceled their annual meetings this year due to high price tags and low expected attendance.

However, sometimes the show must go on. Last week, the American Society of Magazine Editors held their 44th Annual National Magazine awards dinner, albeit with some modifications — they dumped the popular chocolate fondue, scaled back the cheese bar and decided not to ask attendees to don black tie attire, Forbes reported.

Meanwhile, here at Mediabistro we’re gearing up for a conference of our own, Mediabistro Circus, which is going on as planned on June 2-3. We’ll be there, will you?

What do you think about industry groups canceling conferences and awards banquets? Leave your thoughts in the comments.

New Jersey Paper Reaffirms Our Faith in Ad/Edit Split

recordnewstop.gifLocal papers rely on local advertisers to survive. This truth has become even more evident as revenue falls across the industry, which makes this story about New Jersey’s The Record all the more inspiring in the age old battle between editors and publishers.

The paper, owned by North Jersey Media Group, got the scoop about how Hackensack University Medical Center board members were using their political to gain construction contracts and other monetary benefits. After hearing The Record planned to publish the article, hospital administration called up and threatened to pull advertising from the paper’s Web site and NJMG’s other local papers. Editors remained steadfast, however, and the story ran the last Sunday in April.

“It’s pretty obvious [hospital administrators] thought they were going to hurt us very, very badly,” Malcolm A. Borg, chairman of the North Jersey Media Group, told The New York Times.

Justice, however, was served.

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