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Posts Tagged ‘Associated Press’

AP Adds Director of Interactive and Digital News Production

PaulCheungHeadshotDuring the recent annual convention of the Asian American Journalists Association (AAJA), the group shared a fun photo of president Paul Cheung with keynote speaker Ann Curry. A caption-contest opportunity if there ever was one.

The well-liked Cheung has been making his presence known at the AAJA and now has a new title at Associated Press to go along with those duties. He has been named director of interactive and digital news production. From today’s announcement by AP vice president and managing editor Lou Ferrara:

As part of this move, Jaime Holguin, who as the news development manager at the Nerve Center has played a pivotal role in the execution of many of these [digital] products, will report into Paul and the new department. Jaime, as he has been, will work with the business operations on products and be the point person between the rebooted, news-focused Nerve Center and the new department.

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AP Health and Science Editor Heads Back to Texas

Before joining Associated Press in 2001, Kit Frieden was for nine years a state editor at the Houston Chronicle. She’s back in Houston now from New York, but this time, on the PR side.

Frieden has joined the legal PR and marketing firm Androvett Legal Media & Marketing as a legal media consultant. From today’s announcement:

“I am thrilled to be returning to Texas and joining Androvett, a dynamic firm that works with some of the best lawyers and law firms in the country,” says Frieden. “The firm’s clients have terrific stories to tell.”

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AP Finds Its Next Film Writers

Jake Coyle was already with the Associated Press and will remain based in New York.
Jessica Herndon comes from People magazine and calls LA home.

It’s the perfect, practical way for AP to blanket the busy east coast/west coast Hollywood press junket churn. From today’s announcement:

“We are excited to have two dynamic writers and reporters covering the film industry to break news about the movies while providing useful, relevant film reviews,” said Nekesa Mumbi Moody, the AP’s entertainment and lifestyles editor.

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NYT Writer Headed to AP San Francisco

Channing Joseph is moving over to the opposite coast and a very different beat. Starting October 7, he will be the night breaking news staffer at AP’s San Francisco bureau, covering Northern California spot news as it develops.

From the announcement by AP west region editor Traci Carl:

Joseph has been at the Times since 2010, serving most recently as a staff editor on the Metro copy desk while also regularly serving as a reporter on the Continuous News Desk. He also worked as an editor on various other copy desks, including National/Foreign, Business, Features and Sports…

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AP Solidifies LiveU Partnership

The Associated Press must have liked the way LiveU’s mobile video technology allowed it to cover the Nelson Mandela story from a hospital in Pretoria, South Africa. Because today, it has announced an expansion of its use of the portable backpack units.

The big thing with LiveU is, of course, that it allows reporters to connect back to the newsroom and client newscasts via 3G/4G instead of through a more costly and elaborate satellite uplink. From today’s announcement at journalism.co.uk:

“Every major news story that breaks will have live coverage from a video eye-witness within minutes of it happening,” Sandy MacIntyre, AP’s director of global video, told journalism.co.uk. “When journalists arrive on the scene their first thought is going to be ‘we need to get on air live’ – this new technology allows them to do that quickly and cost-effectively.”

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Catching Up to the New York Nun with a Gambling Problem

It takes a lot on the headline front for FishbowlNY to stop dead in its coffee-stained tracks. But this one from AP did the trick:

NY Nun with Gambling Problem Gets Jail for Theft

Holy Mother of Mary Anne Rapp, who will spend 90 days in jail for her casino sins. This headline has everything: blasphemy (a nun gambling); larceny ($128,000 filched from two Kendall, NY area parishes); infamy (her church may already be fielding calls from reality TV show producers)… Never mind that her last name would have also allowed for a “Rapp Sheet” headline. Or that ordering a nun to perform 100 hours of community service seems entirely redundant.

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Morning Media Newsfeed: Gov’t Pushes Shield Law | Bernstein Hacked | Gazette Office Closed


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Criticized on Seizure of Records, White House Pushes News Media Shield Law (NYT)
Under fire over the Justice Department’s use of a broad subpoena to obtain calling records of Associated Press reporters in connection with a leak investigation, the Obama administration sought on Wednesday to revive legislation that would provide greater protections to reporters in keeping their sources and communications confidential. Capital New York The administration opposed an initial draft of the Free Flow of Information Act, but eventually supported a compromise version that would allow federal judges to protect reporters from subpoenas for information, if the judge determined that the news value of the reports exceeded the government’s interest in uncovering the sources of a leak. HuffPost / The Backstory New York Times reporter Charlie Savage asked Attorney General Eric Holder, who had just announced he’d recused himself from the AP leak investigation, “Are you also recused from the Stuxnet investigation out of Maryland?” The New York Times has reason to be concerned about whether investigators are using similar tactics on them. The Maryland case is believed to be focused on Times chief Washington correspondent David Sanger’s reporting on how the U.S. and Israel helped derail Iran’s nuclear program through cyberattacks. Sanger’s June scoop, along with the Times’ front-page article on Obama’s terrorist “kill list,” spurred Congressional calls to investigate the leaks of classified information. The Washington Post / Erik Wemple Media Matters for America, a group that monitors the country’s conservative media for distortions and inaccuracies, fell in for criticism Wednesday over the Justice Department’s secret subpoena of the Associated Press’s phone records. Evidence of this Media Matters-Obama administration mindmeld? This piece here, which says: “If the press compromised active counter-terror operations for a story that only tipped off the terrorists, that sounds like it should be investigated.” The Daily Beast / Politics Beast David Brock explained all in a statement. “Media Matters for America monitors, analyzes, and corrects conservative misinformation in the media and was not involved with the production of the document focusing on the DOJs investigation,” he said. “That document was issued by ‘Message Matters,’ a project of the Media Matters Action Network, which posts, through a different editorial process and to a different website, a wide range of potential messaging products for progressive talkers to win public debates with conservatives.” Read more

Morning Media Newsfeed: Gov’t Defends AP Snoop | Apple Denies Collusion | Sambolin Has Cancer


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Justice Dept. Defends Seizure of AP Phone Records (NYT)
Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr. on Tuesday defended the Justice Department’s sweeping seizure of telephone records of Associated Press journalists, describing the article by the AP that prompted a criminal investigation as among “the top two or three most serious leaks that I’ve ever seen” in a 35-year career. “It put the American people at risk, and that is not hyperbole,” he said in an apparent reference to an article on May 7, 2012, that disclosed the foiling of a terrorist plot by Al Qaeda’s branch in Yemen to bomb an airliner. The Washington Post / Opinions The usual reason for keeping a subpoena secret is that the target would otherwise try to destroy documents. In this case, the AP could not have done so even if it wanted to, since the relevant records were in the possession of its phone service providers. Without even giving AP a chance to weigh in, we don’t see how the department could intelligently weigh its prosecutorial needs against this broad subpoena’s chilling effect on reporters and their sources. HuffPost / The Backstory Associated Press Washington bureau chief Sally Buzbee was among the journalists targeted in the Justice Department’s sweeping seizure of phone records that has drawn widespread condemnation from members of the media and free speech advocates, an AP spokeswoman confirmed to The Huffington Post. FishbowlNY The Department of Justice is trying to brush off the secret accessing of AP editors’ and reporters’ phone records. The agency already sent one bland letter to the AP about the incident, and Tuesday, it sent another. According to AP CEO and president Gary Pruitt, both letters from the DOJ basically said “Meh,” and not much else about the scary over-extension of the government. B&C Society of Professional Journalists president Sonny Albarado has condemned the Justice Department’s alleged secret collection of AP reporter and editor phone records and said it highlights the need for a federal shield law. Politico / Dylan Byers on Media The Associated Press Media Editors Association has joined other journalists in condemning the Justice Department’s seizure of Associated Press phone records, calling it part of the Obama administration’s “continuing witch hunt for leaks and whistleblowers.” TVNewser Fox News host Bill O’Reilly said this may be the least of President Obama’s worries. “I don’t think that’s going to amount to much,” O’Reilly said of the phone taps. “It looks like they went through the warrant process and they had authorization to look at these records — the Justice Department did. But President Obama, he’s got some problems now. He better start to get control of the situation because there’s a lot of stuff going on.” Read more

Morning Media Newsfeed: Gov’t Defends AP Snoop | Apple Denies Collusion | Sambolin Has Cancer


Click here to receive Mediabistro’s Morning Media Newsfeed via email.

Justice Dept. Defends Seizure of AP Phone Records (NYT)
Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr. on Tuesday defended the Justice Department’s sweeping seizure of telephone records of Associated Press journalists, describing the article by the AP that prompted a criminal investigation as among “the top two or three most serious leaks that I’ve ever seen” in a 35-year career. “It put the American people at risk, and that is not hyperbole,” he said in an apparent reference to an article on May 7, 2012, that disclosed the foiling of a terrorist plot by Al Qaeda’s branch in Yemen to bomb an airliner. The Washington Post / Opinions The usual reason for keeping a subpoena secret is that the target would otherwise try to destroy documents. In this case, the AP could not have done so even if it wanted to, since the relevant records were in the possession of its phone service providers. Without even giving AP a chance to weigh in, we don’t see how the department could intelligently weigh its prosecutorial needs against this broad subpoena’s chilling effect on reporters and their sources. HuffPost / The Backstory Associated Press Washington bureau chief Sally Buzbee was among the journalists targeted in the Justice Department’s sweeping seizure of phone records that has drawn widespread condemnation from members of the media and free speech advocates, an AP spokeswoman confirmed to The Huffington Post. FishbowlNY The Department of Justice is trying to brush off the secret accessing of AP editors’ and reporters’ phone records. The agency already sent one bland letter to the AP about the incident, and Tuesday, it sent another. According to AP CEO and president Gary Pruitt, both letters from the DOJ basically said “Meh,” and not much else about the scary over-extension of the government. B&C Society of Professional Journalists president Sonny Albarado has condemned the Justice Department’s alleged secret collection of AP reporter and editor phone records and said it highlights the need for a federal shield law. Politico / Dylan Byers on Media The Associated Press Media Editors Association has joined other journalists in condemning the Justice Department’s seizure of Associated Press phone records, calling it part of the Obama administration’s “continuing witch hunt for leaks and whistleblowers.” TVNewser Fox News host Bill O’Reilly said this may be the least of President Obama’s worries. “I don’t think that’s going to amount to much,” O’Reilly said of the phone taps. “It looks like they went through the warrant process and they had authorization to look at these records — the Justice Department did. But President Obama, he’s got some problems now. He better start to get control of the situation because there’s a lot of stuff going on.”

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Morning Media Newsfeed: Gov’t Spies on AP | Bloomberg Snoop Leaked | Brothers Dies


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Gov’t Obtains Wide AP Phone Records in Probe (The Associated Press / The Big Story)
The Justice Department secretly obtained two months of telephone records of reporters and editors for The Associated Press in what the news cooperative’s top executive called a “massive and unprecedented intrusion” into how news organizations gather the news. The records obtained by the Justice Department listed outgoing calls for the work and personal phone numbers of individual reporters, for general AP office numbers in New York, Washington and Hartford, Conn., and for the main number for the AP in the House of Representatives press gallery, according to attorneys for the AP. The Guardian The AP’s president and chief executive officer, Gary Pruitt, sent a letter of protest to the attorney-general, Eric Holder. “These records potentially reveal communications with confidential sources across all of the newsgathering activities undertaken by the AP during a two-month period, provide a road map to AP’s newsgathering operations, and disclose information about AP’s activities and operations that the government has no conceivable right to know,” Pruitt said. HuffPost / The Backstory Though the DOJ did not give the AP a specific reason for the seizure, the dates of the phone calls it targeted offered a clear tell. On May 7, 2012, AP reporters Adam Goldman and Matt Apuzzo, citing anonymous sources, reported that the CIA had thwarted a plot by an al-Qaeda affiliate to “destroy a U.S.-bound airliner using a bomb with a sophisticated new design around the one-year anniversary of the killing of Osama bin Laden.” Politico Fox News’ Greta Van Susteren told Politico in an email that the DOJ’s seizure “sounds like a dragnet to intimidate the media,” not a criminal investigation. “What is stunning is the breadth of the seizure!” Van Susteren said. EFF While the government has not confirmed, the subpoenas appear to stem from an investigation into a government leak of information to the AP. This is not a sufficient excuse. Imagine if “Deep Throat,” the informant critical to Woodward and Bernstein’s investigation of the 1972 Watergate burglary, knew that his identity could be obtained through legal process. His career, and perhaps his life, would have been in serious jeopardy, and a cautious individual would have kept silent. TVNewser Former CBS News correspondent Kimberly Dozier, now an intelligence and counterterrorism reporter for the AP, was one of the journalists who had their phone logs seized. Dozier was seriously injured in Iraq in 2006. She left CBS for the AP in 2010. FishbowlNY Sadly, the saying “If you’re not worried, you’re not paying attention” never seems more relevant than now. Read more

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