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Posts Tagged ‘avantguild’

The Benefits of J-School in the Digital Age

The cons of attending journalism school can typically be narrowed down to cost of tuition, the importance of real-life job experience, and the cost of tuition. But the contacts you’ll gain from a formal education can’t be underestimated — especially in a business where relationships are everything.

“I made friends with other journalism majors, and those connections have been invaluable in my career,” agreed Lauren Streib, a UNC journalism grad who is now an assistant editor at The Daily Beast. When you first graduate, you all may have entry-level positions or internships, but in about 10 years, your friends will be in charge of hiring decisions or have close relationships with people who do. In 20 years, you’ll be running the show.

Read more in 6 Reasons a Journalism Degree Is Still Necessary. [Mediabistro AvantGuild subscription required]

Mediabistro Course

Travel Writing

Travel WritingStarting September 23, learn how to turn your travel stories into published essays and articles! Taught by a former Vanity Fair staff writer, James Sturz will teach you how to report, interview, and find sources, discover story ideas and pitch them successfully, and understand what travel editors look for in a story. Register now! 

What a Great Magazine Pitch Looks Like

Pitches That WorkedIf there’s one thing editors like writers to have, it’s access to the subject they’re pitching. For Alexis Adams, it was her experience living in a Greek village that helped her query about horta, an ingredient used in many Greek foods, transform into a 500-word piece for the travel pub Afar.

“She was pitching from first-hand experience and had already done significant research. And she laid out, in detail, the elements that would go into the story, whereas many writers simply pitch a concept,” said Derk RichardsonAFAR senior editor. “Moreover, there was an underlying sense of passion and curiosity, which is important when it comes to writing about food and essential when writing about anything for AFAR.”

THE PITCH

Dear Derk:

Paring knife in one hand, empty plastic bag in another, I am following my friend Lakis as he climbs a narrow goat path through thorny brush to a meadow he promises will yield tasty results. We are high on a mountain plateau on the eastern Peloponnese Peninsula in Greece, and we are in search of “horta,” the wild greens prized by Greeks for their health benefits and flavor…

Read the rest in Pitches that Worked: AFAR[subscription required]

Land A Cover Story With Your Weekend Getaways

When you’re jetting off for the long holiday weekend, remember the stories and places you come across — they could land you a cover story.

GO, the award-winning in-flight magazine for Airtran, is seeking in-depth travel pieces on markets that are less-covered. ”We want to inspire really interesting ways of seeing different places,” said Jaime LoweGO‘s executive editor. “We want as many people as possible to get excited about learning about other communities, being surrounded by new experiences and pushing themselves, through travel.”

While most mags advise new writers to break in through smaller, front- or back-of-book stories, GO has a meaty feature well that’s ripe for the pitchin’ — even for first-time freelancers. “We’re always looking for new writers with great stories,” said Lowe. “A great idea always wins. If there’s an excellent travel narrative, we’ll assign it.”

For more details on breaking in, read How To Pitch: GO.

ag_logo_medium.gif This article is one of several mediabistro.com features exclusively available to AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, you can register for as little as $55 a year and get access to these articles, discounts on seminars and workshops, and more.

Hook Editors with a Travel Angle

Under-the-radar locales make for great stories in any travel mag, but, add a Hollywood hook, and editors at this Airtran mag can’t help but hop on board.

In honor of the 40th anniversary of the iconic movie Deliverance, a freelancer pitched and published a story to GO showcasing Georgia’s Tallulah Gorge, where the movie was filmed. The location (about an hour and a half outside of Atlanta) is a popular tourist destination not just because of its place in American pop culture, but also due to the richness of the region and wealth of activities for nature lovers, from whitewater rafting to hiking.

“We’re always looking for new writers with great stories,” said Jaime LoweGO‘s executive editor. “A great idea always wins. If there’s an excellent travel narrative, we’ll assign it.” Get more details in How To Pitch: GO.

ag_logo_medium.gif This article is one of several mediabistro.com features exclusively available to AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, you can register for as little as $55 a year and get access to these articles, discounts on seminars and workshops, and more.

Earn $1/Word At Family Circle

General parenting magazines are aplenty in this industry, but Family Circle specifically zeroes in on the life of raising a teenager. So, scribes hoping for a byline need to make sure they offer concrete tips for the health and well-being of readers’ families.

“We offer essential advice for tough parenting challenges, fun suggestions for family activities, healthy and delicious recipes, and DIY projects to create a comfortable home,” said senior associate editor Stephanie Emma Pfeffer.

If you’re bursting with ideas in any of those topics, you’re in luck. FC relies on freelancers for about 60 percent of its content.

Get more guidelines in How To Pitch: Family Circle.

ag_logo_medium.gif This article is one of several mediabistro.com features exclusively available to AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, you can register for as little as $55 a year and get access to these articles, discounts on seminars and workshops, and more.

Boston Bylines For New Yorkers

Landing a byline at a regional pub when you’re an out-of-towner takes some effort, but as long as you keep in mind the audience you’re writing for, editors are usually open-minded.

Take The Boston Globe Magazine, for example. Editor-in-chief Susanne Althoff asks freelancers to remember that the Globe magazine is, at root, a local magazine. “That doesn’t mean we’re not interested in national trend stories,” she said. “But it’s got to be a trend that’s of interest to readers in the Boston area, or in the greater Boston/New England area.”

Find out where to send your story ideas in How To Pitch: The Boston Globe Magazine.

ag_logo_medium.gif This article is one of several mediabistro.com features exclusively available to AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, you can register for as little as $55 a year and get access to these articles, discounts on seminars and workshops, and more.

9 Interview Errors You Might Not Know You’re Committing

Let’s be honest: Getting the job is all about staying on the interviewer’s good side. But even the best of us can annoy the hiring manager without even realizing it. Example one? Talking way too much.

Sheryl Bender, senior HR representative with the Port of Long Beach, Calif., calls people who gab incessantly “the bane of an interviewer’s existence.”

“We understand that you want to answer the question fully, but being concise — as long as you’ve answered the question — is truly okay. The longer you talk, the higher your chances of turning the interviewer off to your answer,” she said. “Also, pay attention to social cues; if the interviewer frequently has to cut you off in order to move on, you’re probably talking too much.”

Learn how to fix eight more blunders in 9 Things You Should Never Do on a Job Interview.

ag_logo_medium.gifThis article is one of several mediabistro.com features exclusively available to AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, you can register for as little as $55 a year and get access to these articles, discounts on seminars and workshops, and more.

 

Think Hyperlocal When Pitching Afar

At Afar, editors are seeking stories of travelers who like to juice the place they’re visiting for all it’s worth — interacting with the locals, going off the touristy trail to shop in real marketplaces, and eating indigenous, authentically prepared meals.

Although their median income hovers just above the six-figure mark and they enjoy all of the earmarks of luxury, the mag’s readers like a real-life experience with their vacationing. With that in mind, aspiring Afar writers need to bring their A-game (think affluence and authenticity) to snag an assignment.

“There’s a real emphasis on giving readers a deeper dive, a sort of street-level view of a place,” editor-in-chief Julia Cosgrove explained.

Find out which sections are ripe for input in How To Pitch: Afar.

ag_logo_medium.gifThis article is one of several mediabistro.com features exclusively available to AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, you can register for as little as $55 a year and get access to these articles, discounts on seminars and workshops, and more.

Globetrotting Foodies Can Find a Home at Afar

If you’re a foodie with a fully stamped passport, Afar editors want to hear your stories, but only if your far-reaching adventures break away from the tourist traps and allow you to enjoy indigenous, authentically prepared meals.

And it will take more than a simple recipe to cinch the deal. Editors want queries centered around a local authentic dish, putting it in a historical context and exploring how it connects to the people and community that birthed it.

“So it’s not food as food, but food as culture,” editor-in-chief Julia Cosgrove emphasized.

Get contact info for editors and more guidelines in How To Pitch: Afar.

ag_logo_medium.gifThis article is one of several mediabistro.com features exclusively available to AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, you can register for as little as $55 a year and get access to these articles, discounts on seminars and workshops, and more.

Get $1 Per Word And Up At Food Network Magazine

Want to see your byline next to those of Food Network stars? It is difficult, but not impossible.

Right now, about 5 to 10 percent of Food Network Magazine‘s content is freelance-generated, at most. ”We’re a hard pitch. I can probably count on one or two hands how many pitches we’ve accepted since we launched,” said deputy editor Tracy Saelinger. “That said, we welcome ideas from writers, but they just have to be newsy, quirky and fun. We get pitched lots of tired trends that feel like old news.”

For details on three freelancer-friendly sections, read How To Pitch: Food Network Magazine.

ag_logo_medium.gifThis article is one of several mediabistro.com features exclusively available to AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, you can register for as little as $55 a year and get access to these articles, discounts on seminars and workshops, and more.

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